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  • Five ocean gliders were deployed during cruise SSD-024 as part of the Bay of Bengal Boundary Layer Experiment (BoBBLE), a collaborative project between India and the UK, funded jointly by Ministry of Earth Sciences (MoES), Government of India, and Natural Environmental Research Council, UK, through the “Drivers of Variability in the South Asian Monsoon” programme. The major objective of this project is to understand the east-west contrast in the upper layer characteristics of the southern Bay of Bengal and its interaction with the summer monsoon. The major observational objectives of SSD-024 were to profile the hydrography along 8°N in international waters and to carry out a 10-day time series at 8°N, 89°E. 14 scientists from India and 8 from the UK made up the scientific contingent of SSD-024. Five Seagliders were successfully deployed in the southern Bay of Bengal from ORV Sindhu Sadhana during the BoBBLE cruise. These autonomous underwater vehicles fly in a continuous repeating sawtooth pattern from the surface down to a maximum depth of 1000 m. They are all equipped with conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensors. Additional sensors include dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence and backscatter, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and microstructure sensors. Three Seagliders (including one microstructure enabled glider) are from the University of East Anglia (UEA), UK glider facility. The remaining two Seagliders are from the Marine Autonomous Robotics Systems (MARS) national UK facility. All five Seagliders were deployed and piloted by UEA and associated personnel.

  • The data set contains a variety of physical, chemical and biological parameters. Hydrographic profiles provided temperature, salinity, fluorescence, dissolved oxygen and transmissance measurements, which were supplemented by time series of surface ocean and meteorological properties. Time series of current velocities, temperature and sea level were also collected. Biogeochemical and biological analyses of water samples provided nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton data, while production data were derived from incubation experiments. The data were collected at seven stations in the Celtic Sea with varying physical and biological characteristics. Fieldwork was undertaken between 15th and 29th May 2000, with each station being occupied for 24 hours. Data were collected via shipboard deployment of CTD profilers and undulators with accompanying auxiliary sensors, and discrete water sampling. Further data were obtained from three moorings including acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), temperature recorders and bottom pressure recorders that were also deployed and recovered during the study period. Measurements were collected during RRS Discovery cruise D246 as part of the multidisciplinary study of the interactions between physical processes and biological production in contrasting pelagic shelf waters. An additional goal of the study was to map the tidal front situated in the St George's Channel. The study was co-ordinated by Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the research involved 28 scientists and technicians from 14 separate institutions situated in five different countries. Data are managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • Groundwater temperature data from a shallow urban aquifer in Cardiff, Wales, UK between 2014-2018. Monitoring was undertaken as part of the ‘Cardiff Urban Geo-Observatory’ project . Boreholes are located within the urban area of the City of Cardiff, Wales, UK. The majority of temperature sensors were installed within boreholes that monitor a shallow Quaternary aged sand and gravel aquifer, however the made ground and the Triassic Mercia Mudstone also represented. Temperature sensors installed in 53 boreholes, between depths of 1.5m and 12- m below ground, with measurements every 30 minutes. The dataset comprises of just over 3.5 million temperature measurements. Monitoring was undertaken by the British Geological Survey and was designed to address knowledge gaps of subsurface urban heat island and it use for heat recovery and storage. Metadata Report http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/525332/

  • NIGL (NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratories) is a comprehensive stable and radiogenic isotope laboratory facility that undertakes environmental, life, archaeological and earth science research, and educates and trains PhD students, in a collaborative research environment. This dataset contains a complete record of publications and scientific reports involving NIGL staff, dating from the formation of the group in 1987. The published research is not geographically restricted.

  • BGS offshore marine products are made available to view via this web map service. The 1:250 000 scale offshore geological maps in the UTM series (Universal Transverse Mercator projection) are available digitally as two themes: bedrock geology (DigRock250) and sea-bed sediments (DigSBS250). Marine Hard Substrate Dataset (DiGHardSubstrate250k) is also made available via this service.

  • This layer of the map-based index (GeoIndex) shows the boundaries of the G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) project mapping areas, which are reported as geochemical atlases. The majority of atlases are for stream sediment, with data on stream water and soil included where available. Separate stream sediment, soil and stream water atlases have been published for Wales. Hard copy atlases are available for Shetland, Orkney, South Orkney and Caithness, Sutherland, Hebrides, Great Glen, East Grampians, Argyll, Southern Scotland, Lake District, NE England, NW England and N Wales and Wales. Digital atlases/map products are available for the Clyde Basin, Central England, London Region and SW England. National digital atlas products are available also.

  • Data from this project is a UK contribution to a US research cruise that aimed to examine the impact of wave breaking and bubble processes on air-sea gas exchange. Measurements were made of whitecap fraction, wave state, wave bubble statistics and bubble properties beneath breaking waves on the R/V Knorr KN213-3 cruise departing Nuuk, Greenland October 9, 2013 arriving at Woods Hole, USA on November 12, 2013. Instruments and platforms used included an 11 meter long free-floating spar buoy equipped with wave wires, a bubble camera, acoustic resonators, a Waverider buoy and ship measurements of aerosol fluxes. Data generation were funded by NERC parent grant NE/J020893/1 awarded to Professor Ian Brooks and associated child grants NE/J020540/1 and NE/J022373/2 awarded to Mr Robin Pascal and Dr Helen Czerski respectively.

  • The dataset comprises the combination of estimates of anthropogenic carbon derived from hydrographic occupations of the 26N section with volume transports for the area between east USA and Africa calculated using the RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS AMOC timeseries. The data cover the time period between April 2004 and October 2012. The observations will be used with data from other sources to determine and interpret the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon in the North Atlantic, to infer the magnitude and variability of uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and assess the risk of changes in the meridional overturning circulation on the marine carbon cycle. The Atlantic Biogeochemical Fluxes programme (ABC-Fluxes) is a joint effort between NERC in the UK (Principal Investigator Elaine McDonagh), and NOAA in the USA (Molly Baringer). It builds on the work of the RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS programme, a joint effort between NERC in the UK (Principal Investigator Eleanor Frajka-Williams), NOAA (Molly Baringer) and RSMAS (Bill Johns) in the USA. The Atlantic anthropogenic carbon transport (and its components), calculated from the above data, are held by BODC in NetCDF format.

  • A large number of charts (originals and copies) together with tabulations of data are also available, some of which date back to the 1850s. A more detailed description of these will be available once they have been systematically catalogued and archived.

  • A set of historical tide gauge sea level records from Santander (Northern Spain) have been recovered from logbooks stored at the Spanish National Geographical Institute (IGN). Sea level measurements have been digitised, quality-controlled and merged into a consistent sea level time series. Vertical references among instruments benchmarks have been derived from high precision vertical levelling surveys. The observations were recorded as daily averages and are from three different instruments in two locations in Santander (Spain). The historical sea level record in Santander consists of a daily time series spanning the period 1876-1924 and it is further connected to the modern tide gauge station nearby, ensuring datum continuity up to the present. The data from Santander comes from a floating gauge and then syphon gauges. This scarcity of long-term sea-level observations, as well as their uneven geographical distribution is a major challenge for climate studies that address, for example, the quantification of mean sea-level rise at centennial time scales, the accurate assessment of sea-level acceleration or the long-term changes in sea-level extremes that are vital for coastal risk assessments. This dataset represents an additional effort of sea-level data archaeology and aims at preserving the historical scientific heritage that has been up to now stored in old archives in non-electronic format. The research was partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities. A further two series were rescued from Alicante under the same initiative.