cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

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  • This service displays a series of datasets consisting of mean estimate distribution maps of ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior) across Great Britain. It includes ash trees in areas less than half a hectare, ash trees in woody linear features and individual ash trees. The data are derived from Countryside Survey 2007. Trees were mapped in 569 1km sample squares across Britain using a stratified random sampling system based on the ITE Land Classification. Mean national estimates were produced by scaling up from the sample data.

  • This dataset is part of Integrated Hydrological Units (IHU) of the UK, a set of geographical reference units for hydrological purposes including river flow measurement and hydrometric data collection. Hydrometric Areas are either integral river catchments having one or more outlets to the sea or tidal estuary, or they may include several contiguous river catchments having topographical similarity but separate tidal outlets. Hydrometric Areas are the coarsest units of the IHU in terms of spatial resolution. This dataset represents the same entities as the Hydrometric Areas with Coastline. The coastline of Hydrometric Areas without Coastline follows the boundaries of the CEH Integrated Hydrological Digital Terrain Model, from which IHU were derived, while the coastline used in Hydrometric Areas with Coastline was derived from Ordnance Survey data. The Hydrometric Areas without Coastline currently covers Great Britain only as no dataset with river geometries and names with suitable detail is available for Northern Ireland. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3a4e94fc-4c68-47eb-a217-adee2a6b02b3

  • This dataset is part of Integrated Hydrological Units (IHU) of the UK, a set of geographical reference units for hydrological purposes including river flow measurement and hydrometric data collection. A Section is the drainage area of a watercourse between two confluences. Only confluences of named watercourses were considered. Each Section carries a name constructed from names of the major river flowing through the Section, the major river flowing into the Section, and the major river into which the Section flows. Sections are spatially consistent with Groups: each Group is made up of one or more Section. Each Section is associated with one Catchment representing the full area upstream from the Section outlet. Identifiers and attributes have been calculated so that direct upstream and direct downstream IHU units can be selected. This layer currently covers Great Britain only as no dataset with river geometries and names with suitable detail is available for Northern Ireland. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a6e37e39-9e10-4647-a110-12d902403095

  • This dataset contains daily automated weather station (AWS) data from the Climoor field site in Clocaenog forest, North East Wales. The data are air temperature (mean, minimum and maximum), rainfall, net radiation, solar radiation, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), wind speed and direction. The dataset has been quality checked, and incorrect or missing values removed, data has not been infilled. Data runs from 12/6/1999 until 30/06/2015, no data was collected March 2006 and June 2008. Air temperature, rainfall and wind speed and direction were recorded since June 1999. Measurements of relative humidity, air pressure, net and solar radiation and PAR started in June 2008. Since June 2008, data are recorded in minute intervals, averaged to hourly, then to daily means that are reported here. The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes. The reported data are collected to monitor site specific environmental conditions and their development with time. These data are important to interpret results that are collected from the climate change manipulations imposed in the field. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7f2a4935-a9e8-47dc-b126-93d9e19496bd

  • This dataset combines daily automated weather station (AWS) from the Climoor field site in Clocaenog forest, North East Wales The data are on relative humidity (percent), air temperature (degrees Celsius), rainfall (millimetres), air pressure (millibars), net radiation (millivolts), solar radiation (Kilowatts per square metre per second), photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), (micromol per square metre per second), wind speed (metres per second) and wind direction (degrees). These data are an extension for the Daily automated weather station dataset (1998-2015) for the time period July 2015 to August 2016. Data were not collected between 9th October 2015 and 3rd November 2015 due to problems with the sensors. Data are recorded in minute intervals. Up to January 2016 the data were averaged hourly, after January 2016 data were averaged half hourly. Data are then to averaged to daily values, which are reported here. Data collection, processing and quality checking was carried out by members of CEH Bangor staff. The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes. The reported data are collected to monitor site specific environmental conditions and their development with time. These data are important to interpret results that are collected from the climate change manipulations imposed in the field. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3a88f547-376d-4a7e-8817-9b5f9ccd5b82

  • The Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP), funded by the DTI (Department of Trade and Industry) carried out baseline mineral exploration in Great Britain between 1972 and 1997. Its main aim was to stimulate private-sector exploration and the development of indigenous mineral resources. It has been subsumed into the new BGS Minerals Programme, also funded by the DTI. The Programme provides information and advice to industry, enables technology transfer and promotes wealth creation through the effective sustainable development of Britain's mineral resources. The database contains information from the MRP together with some from earlier programmes and the new Minerals Programme. Information from the early 1970s was largely concerned with the search for uranium and base-metals, while since the 1980s gold and platinum-group elements (PGEs) have dominated. A range of pathfinder elements have also been determined. Data is held on the geochemistry of drainage stream sediments, panned concentrates, soil, deep overburden, rock and drillcore samples. All geochemical results are used to populate corporate Geochemistry Database.

  • Field notebooks,maps, field sheets etc for Regional gravity observations on the UK mainland, Northern Ireland, offshore islands, tidal estuaries and seabed. Most of the surveys were carried out by the BGS but the database includes data originally acquired by other organisations and subsequently given to the BGS to be managed as part of the national archive. Complete coverage of the UK mainland with a station density of 1-2 stations per square kilometre.

  • The database contains a range of geochemical data for metamorphosed limestones from the Dalradian of Scotland and Northern Ireland. The data include a) whole-rock geochemical analyses by XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) for major oxides and a range of trace elements for several hundred samples, b) a number of whole-carbonate O (oxygen) and C (carbon) stable isotope and Sr (strontium) data, c) electron microprobe mineral data on carbonates and calc-silicate minerals and d) ion-probe O stable isotope and mineral trace element data for calcites in a small number of samples. The samples from which the data have been derived were collected from a wide range of outcrops within the Scottish and Irish Dalradian, mainly concentrated in the North East Grampian Highlands of Scotland. The data have been collected mainly to support the mapping and scientific work being undertaken in the Grampian Highlands by BGS since the early 1980s. The database includes some data from the literature. All samples are located by British National Grid coordinates to the nearest 10m or better. The isotope data were acquired as part of a PhD study by C W Thomas in the late 1990s. The database is not currently being added to, but is still being used in various studies. The combined data provide wide-ranging insights into marine chemistry contemporary with deposition of the limestones and the way in which this chemistry changed with time during the Neoproterozoic, and they elucidate subsequent effects of diagenesis and metamorphism and the outcrop and grain-scale. The data set is largely complete with regard to geochemical data, but still requires some editing to bring all fields up to date, particularly with regard to lithostratigraphical assignation. The data are currently held in MS Access tables and can conveniently be displayed via GIS or abstracted in tabular form and used in spreadsheets, statistical analysis and graphing software.

  • Index to various collections of Aerial Photographs purchased or obtained by BGS and its precursors as part of its surveying activities. The index was set up in 2000 and mainly covers Great Britain. The level of spatial detail depends on the flight plans provided, but most are referenced at least to OS quarter sheet level.

  • Soil samples collected in urban areas throughout the UK are analysed for their major and trace element geochemistry, their pH and organic matter content. Samples are collected at two depths; 0-15cm and 35-45cm at sites selected using a stratified, random design. The data can be used to identify and prioritize contaminated sites. In 1993, the Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environm (G-BASE) rural geochemical mapping programme was extended to include sampling in urban areas and to date around 22 urban centres have been sampled. Data is available on key inorganic contaminants including Cr, Cu, Cd, Ni, As, Pb, Zn, Sn and Sb. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. Urban centres are selected in areas where rural sampling is undertaken or where the BGS urban programme is active. Urban centres will continue to be sampled until completion of the rural programme, scheduled for 2015.