cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notApplicable

1060 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 1060
  • This dataset contains data from two seismic and one infrasound array deployed at Mt. Etna during the late part of the 2020-2021 eruptive crises (May-November 2021). The arrays were composed as follow: 1) a 7-element array of 3-component, broadband (Trillium T120 compact) seismometers; 2) a 5-element array of 3-component short-period (Lennartz LE-3Dlite-MkII); 3) a 6-element array of broadband infrasound microphones (IST2018). All data were recorded with a sampling rate of 100 Hz and 24-bit resolution using Digos Datacube3 digitizers. The data were collected through a collaboration between the University of Liverpool, UK, and the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Italy, with the purpose of characterizing pre- and syn-eruption tremor signals at Etna, and their links to the timing, style and intensity of paroxysmal eruptive activity at the volcano. The dataset contains records of different examples of paroxysmal activity (i.e., intense episodes of sustained Strombolian explosions accompanied by emission of ash at the vent) as well signals associated with as explosive degassing at the summit vent. Data recovery rates for this experiment were high; there are only very minor gaps in the data owing to periods of scheduled maintenance and data download during the deployment period.

  • Fault analyses used to estimate underlying dyke properties, imaged in 3D seismic reflection data. The seismic reflection data are located offshore NW Australia and image a series of Late Jurassic dykes and overlying dyke-induced normal faults; these structures occur within a sedimentary basin and are now buried beneath several kilometres of rock. The specific seismic reflection dataset used for this study so far is the Chandon 3D survey, which is freely available through https://www.ga.gov.au/nopims. Other 3D seismic surveys (e.g., Glencoe) near Chandon will be used in due course to extend the study area. Analyses of these faults uses an array of point pairs, defined by X, Y, and Z co-ordinates, that mark where certain sedimentary beds are intersected by the fault in its footwall and hanging wall. Mapping of these points every 125 m along each studied fault, for 11-14 sedimentary horizons, was conducted using Petrel seismic interpretation software. From the footwall and hanging wall point pairs, the throw, heave, displacement, and dip of each fault was calculated. By measuring distances between corresponding point pairs on opposing faults, graben width properties and estimated down-dip fault continuations were calculated. The expression of dyke-induced faults observed at the surface in active volcanic areas is often used to estimate dyke location, thickness (expected to roughly equal the heave on overlying faults), and upper tip depth (expected to occur where overlying, oppositely dipping faults meet; i.e. the point of the ‘V’). This study represents the first time natural dyke-induced faults and underlying dykes have been imaged in 3D and quantitatively studied. The dataset presented here allows hypotheses concerning relationships between dyke-induced fault geometries and dyke properties to finally be tested, and provides insight into normal fault kinematics; this will be useful to structural geologists and volcanologists.

  • Data set is of drill fluid return, settling tank, and bore hole flush fluids sampled during the development of GGC01 seismic monitoring borehole and GGA07 and GGA08 mine water geothermal wells at the UKGEOS - Glasgow site.

  • Chemical composition of 18 ion adsorption deposits (lateritic soils) from Ambohimirahavavy alkaline province, North West Madagascar as part of NERC funded SoS RARE in 2016. Samples collected from pits at depths down to 6.5m below surface. Details of samples in dataset “Sample list for the SoS RARE project” (https://webapps.bgs.ac.uk/services/ngdc/accessions/index.html#item165705 ). Chemical composition of biological and chemical leachates from one Madagascan sample. Time series covers 60 days leaching during 2016 and results are in mg/kg of original material. Biological leaching agents: Aspergillus sp. And Bacillus sp. Inoculum and natural community and chemical leaching agent: ammonium sulphate. Details of experimental procedure in https://doi.org/10.3390/min8060236. Experiments conducted at the British Geological Survey to assess suitability of bioleaching as a more sustainable alternative to chemical leaching of rare earth elements from ion adsorption deposits.

  • The <250um fraction of 19 household vacuum dust samples (collected by citizen participants during 2019-2021) were extracted using high throughput isolation of microbial genomic DNA and sequenced using Illumina NextSeq (12 samples from a national campaign within the UK, 7 samples from Greece and a negative reagent control included to ensure sterility throughout the processing and sequencing steps). These data are available (following period of embargo) from the European Nucleotide Archive via the individual sample accession numbers ERS9609044 to ERS9609063, submitted under the study ID PRJEB49546. Sample location data are provided at town/city, country level. Given the amount of time people spend indoors, residential environments are perhaps the most important, but understudied environments with respect to human exposure to microbes and other contaminants. Across our urban environments, anthropogenic activities (both current and legacy) provide for multiple sources and pathways for the generation and distribution of microbes, inorganic and organic contaminants within the home environment, yet we know relatively little about the potential for dissemination of antibiotic resistance in microbial communities within indoor dust.

  • A dataset of trace metal concentrations (As, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in indoor dust from homes from 11 countries, along with a suite of potentially contributory residential characteristics. A household vacuum dust sample, collected by the study participant using their regular vacuum cleaner, was submitted to the laboratory for analysis by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) on the <250um sieved fraction, along with the completion of an online questionnaire survey. Dust sample collection took place between 2018 – 2021. The Home Biome project is affiliated to the DustSafe community science programme (see mapmyenvironment.com). Sample location data are provided at town/city and Country level. Health risk from exposure to potentially contaminant-laden dust has been widely reported. Given the amount of time people spend indoors, residential environments are an important but understudied environment with respect to human exposure to contaminants. Indeed, the nature of the hazard that house dust presents remains poorly characterized. These data will be of interest to those interested in human exposure to potentially toxic elements and environmental health, as well as to the participants, who received a bespoke report on their sample data and information on key sources and ways to reduce exposure to trace elements in indoor dust.

  • Thermal and Alternating Field demagnetisation data from Visean-carbonates from Meathop Quarry sampled in 2018. This covers the Martin Limestone Formation. MQ are sample codes sampled and data collection carried out by Tereza Kamenikova and Dr Mark Hounslow. The AF demagnetisation data flagged with a *G has a GRM correction applied along the lines described in Stephenson (1993). Data measured on a 2G instruments RAPID, with blank correction as in Hounslow(2019). File for of demagnetisaon data in in header and also described in the GM4Edit software (Hounslow et al. 2019). Sub-samples from main sample given codes like MQ2.1, MQ2.2 etc Hounslow, M.W. 2019. GM4Edit (v.5.6) - a windows program to manage, plot, export and manipulate palaeomagnetic magnetometer datasets. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.31877.91361/1.

  • Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the remote site (DALR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the underline site (DALU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert, J., Beggan, C. D., Richardson, G. S., Martyn, T., & Thomson, A. W. P. (2020). Differential magnetometer measurements of geomagnetically induced currents in a complex high voltage network. Space Weather, 18, e2019SW002421. doi: 10.1029/2019SW002421 for further details.

  • This study was carried out jointly by the University of Birmingham and the British Geological Survey. The report addresses the feasibility of using novel quantum-technology-based gravity sensors to monitor underground CO2 storage. Of particular interest is the applicability to upcoming near-surface leak monitoring trials that the British Geological Survey will be conducting at its test site. UKCCSRC Flexible Funding 2021: Feasibility study into Quantum Technology based Gravity Sensing for CCS

  • Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 “Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)”. These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field and the field created by GIC at the underline site (BUDU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert, J., Beggan, C. D., Richardson, G. S., Martyn, T., & Thomson, A. W. P. (2020). Differential magnetometer measurements of geomagnetically induced currents in a complex high voltage network. Space Weather, 18, e2019SW002421. doi: 10.1029/2019SW002421 for further details.