Creation year

2000

114 record(s)
 
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  • Oju/Obi is a remote part of Eastern Nigeria. There are severe water shortages during the 4-5 month dry season. The hydrogeology of the area is complex, and groundwater is difficult to find. In an attempt to understand and quantify the available groundwater resources within the area, DFID commissioned BGS from 1997 – 2000 to carry out a hydrogeological review of the area and devise appropriate and effective methods for siting wells and boreholes assessing groundwater resources and how best these resources could be developed. The field study involved the collection of time series data including groundwater chemistry and rainfall Cl along with mineralogical information. These results are being used by WaterAid, Local and regional Government to help local communities develop sustainable water supplies.

  • Water samples have predominantly been collected by the G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) project at an average sampling density of one sample per 1.5 km square. Samples have been collected from approximately 85% of Great Britain but it is only from Wales and Humber-Trent southwards that a wide range of analytes have been determined. Currently G-BASE stream water samples collected from high order streams are determined by ICP-AES for 27 elements - Sr, Cd, Ba, Si, Mn, Fe, P, S (as SO42-), B, Mg, V, Na, Mo, Al, Be, Ca, Zn, Cu, Pb, Li, Zr, Co, Ni, Y, La, K and Cr; and by quadrupole ICP-MS for 24 trace elements - Li, Be, Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, As, Rb, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Tl, Pb, Th and U. Automated colorimetric methods are used to determine Cl and NO3- and ion selective electrode is used to determine F. Waters are also analysed for non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC) to determine dissolved organic carbon content. All samples have routinely been analysed for pH, conductivity and bicarbonate. Much of the UK coverage also includes uranium and fluoride analyses.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location, with basic metadata, of selected DECC (Department of Energy & Climate Change) offshore hydrocarbon wells. The source data for this layer was downloaded from the DECC website at www.og.decc.gov.uk/information/maps_offshore.htm. These are DECC owned data and information and supply of the actual data is through the DECC release agents.

  • This dataset consists of the vector version of the Land Cover Map 2000 for Great Britain, containing individual parcels of land cover (the highest available resolution). Level 2 & Level 3 attributes are available. Level 2, the standard level of detail, provides 26 LCM2000 target or ('sub') classes. This is the most widely used version of the dataset. Level 3 gives higher class detail. However, the quality of this level of detail may vary in different areas of the country, requiring expert interpretation. The dataset is part of a series of data products produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology known as LCM2000. LCM2000 is a parcel-based thematic classification of satellite image data covering the entire United Kingdom. The map updates and upgrades the Land Cover Map of Great Britain (LCMGB) 1990. Like the earlier 1990 products, LCM2000 is derived from a computer classification of satellite scenes obtained mainly from Landsat, IRS and SPOT sensors and also incorporates information derived from other ancillary datasets. LCM2000 was classified using a nomenclature corresponding to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompasses the entire range of UK habitats. In addition, it recorded further detail where possible. The series of LCM2000 products includes vector and raster formats, with a number of different versions containing varying levels of detail and at different spatial resolutions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b79e887e-a2a7-4224-8fd7-e78066b950b3

  • Profile soil analyses are available from a number of BGS programmes, notably the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP) and the Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) programme. Sampling depth and range of analytes determined is very variable for the MRP. G-BASE samples are consistently from 35 - 50 cm though since 2003 it has become routine practice in the G-BASE project to collect a top soil and deeper profile sample from the same site but only analyses the top soil and store the profile soil. This also applies in urban areas. The G-BASE profile soils were generally sieved to 150 microns before analysis and determined by XRFS for some or all of: Mg, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, V, Cr, Co, Ba, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pb, Bi, Th, U, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Ge, Sc, Se, Br, Hf, Ta, W, Tl, Te and I. MRP samples can include profile samples from greater than 1 meter collected using a power auger and also include till samples. The G-BASE samples are collected at a density of 1 sample per two square kilometres in rural areas and 4 samples every kilometre square in urban areas. MRP sampling was more site specific generally collecting soil samples along lines at spacing intervals generally 25 - 250 m.

  • This dataset consists of a 25m resolution raster version of the Land Cover Map 2000 for Great Britain. Each 25m pixel represents a 25m area of land cover target class, broadly representing Broad Habitats (see below). The dataset is part of a series of data products produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology known as LCM2000. LCM2000 is a parcel-based thematic classification of satellite image data covering the entire United Kingdom. The map updates and upgrades the Land Cover Map of Great Britain (LCMGB) 1990. Like the earlier 1990 products, LCM2000 is derived from a computer classification of satellite scenes obtained mainly from Landsat, IRS and SPOT sensors and also incorporates information derived from other ancillary datasets. LCM2000 was classified using a nomenclature corresponding to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompasses the entire range of UK habitats. In addition, it recorded further detail where possible. The series of LCM2000 products includes vector and raster formats, with a number of different versions containing varying levels of detail and at different spatial resolutions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f802edfc-86b7-4ab9-b8fa-87e9135237c9

  • The map based index includes outlines for some 8,000 opencast coal prospecting sites dating from the 1940s until the mid 1990s. The index leads to information on the records of some 1 million boreholes (additional to those shown in the Borehole Records layer) drilled during site exploration and also the accompanying plans and other data, all filed in 3,618 boxes. The sites include those that have been drilled and not worked and also those that have been exploited. The original data, hardcopy maps, were received from the Coal Authority in 2001.

  • This dataset consists of invertebrate (soil mesofauna) counts from soils sampled across Great Britain in 1998. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f3e71ba6-bfd7-4841-9ce4-fd1f0d590d2d

  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), chlorobenzenes (CB) and organochlorine pesticides (OC) data from river water collected at various sites within the Humber catchment area as part of the Land Ocean Interaction Study project (LOIS). Data were collected at regular weekly intervals and intermittently during periods of high flows. All sites were samples from early 1994 to the end of 1996 except for O12, which was sampled from November 1994 till November 1996. The sampling was carried out by the LOIS team at York University. The unfiltered samples were transported to the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Monks Wood, UK, where they were extracted with hexane, cleaned up by alumina column chromatography, concentrated and then analysed for CBs by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and PCBs and OCs by Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection (GC-ECD). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/40ba6fd0-3d41-4520-8d78-cc8c893fd974

  • The map shows the location of excess sample materials from the G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment) geochemistry project:- stream sediments, panned heavy mineral concentrates and soils are stored long term in the National Geoscience Data Centre and are available for use in other projects. The Minerals Programme (incorporating the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme) sample collection contains reference samples of drill cores, rocks, tills, soils, stream sediments and panned concentrates. These samples were collected in the period 1974 - to date in mineralised and potentially mineralised areas of the United Kingdom, principally in the northern and western Britain.