Creation year

2005

129 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 129
  • The data comprises a GIS layers representing the permeability of Superficial geological deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale, 1:625:000, is used. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises GIS layers representing the permeability of mass movement deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000,. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through mass movement deposits and the ability of a unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The GeoSure datasets and related reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement due to six types of natural geological hazard, in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMapGB-50 (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • SCCS presentations, consultations, responses, briefings and communications on CCS and CO2 storage for the period 2005 - 2009

  • The dataset is based on a 1 hectare(ha) vector grid which covers the whole of Wales. It has been populated with a series of environmental and cultural assets, reflecting the presence or absence of an asset in an individual cell. The dataset has been designed to enable a single asset to be displayed in a generalised fomat; total numbers of assets within a given cell; or the opportunity to create in unique combination of the assets based on the generalised 1 ha data. The data is also available at 1km.

  • SCCS is the largest Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research group in the UK. Our internationally renowned researchers provide connected strength across the full CCS chain. With our unique position SCCS is able to act as the conduit between academia, industry and government. We are able to provide a single point of coordination for all aspects of CCS research ranging from capture engineering and geoscience, to social perceptions and environmental impact, through to law and petroleum economics. SCCS has access to cutting-edge experimental and analytical facilities, expertise in field studies, modelling and simulation, key academic and research personnel to accelerate the development of CO2 transportation, capture and subsurface storage. We undertake strategic fundamental research and are also available for consultancy. In addition, we perform a key role in providing impartial advice to industry, the public sector, government agencies, and policy makers. Founded in 2005, SCCS is a partnership of the British Geological Survey, Heriot-Watt University, the University of Aberdeen, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Strathclyde working together with universities across Scotland. SCCS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

  • The FLUXEX (Flux Experiment) project was an experiment to establish the fluxes of many ozone depleting gases (CFCs, HCFCs, halons) and greenhouse gases (HFCs, PFCs, SF6) from the UK. Its aim was to assess regional emission inventories of these gases to feed the UNEP/WMO Ozone Assessment and the UNFCCC. Attempts were also made to measure for the first time "new" ozone depleting gases, such as n-propyl bromide and hexachlorobutadiene, and to estimate UK emissions. To achieve this purpose, the FAAM aircraft, fitted with air sampling bottles, was flown in the boundary layer upwind and downwind of the UK. A total of 9 flights took place between 30. March and 29. September 2005.

  • An international long-term collaboration to study the climatic and environmental feedback mechanisms involved in the African monsoon, and in some of its consequences on society and human health. The programme, which started in 2004, has developed a network of ground-based observation stations over Sub-Saharan West Africa to measure heat flux and, for some stations, CO2 and H2O vapour fluxes. Files also include concomitant meteorological measurements (wind, temperature, pressure, humidity, rainfall) and soil physics parameters (soil temperature and moisture). The UK branch of AMMA makes use of several instruments provided by the UK Universities Facility for Atmospheric Measurement (UFAM) which are centred on the Niamey meso-site. The Facility for Airbourne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) aircraft was used during the July-August 2006 campaign.

  • The AUTEX / WINTEX (Autumn and Winter Experiments) project was a Met Office campaign on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) aircraft, that collected cloud physics and radiation data over the UK, from October 2004 to February 2007. The dataset collection contains measurements of water vapour distribution in both the horizontal and the vertical, mixed phase cloud structure and ice initiation in cumulus clouds. They also included studies into sea surface reflectance at low solar zenith angles, cirrus cloud radiative properties, microwave signature of 'bright band', clear air spectroscopy at night, clear air spectroscopy in the infrared and far infrared, land surface emissivity studies and the effect of inhomogeneity in clouds at low solar zenith angles. FAAM Bae-146 non-core data is now public, but raw Bae-146 core data is restricted to the FAAM staff.