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2008

220 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 220
  • Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a crucial technology to enable the decarbonisation of fossil fuel electricity generation. The UK has considerable potential for geological storage of CO2 under the North Sea and extensive offshore industry experience that could be applied. While initial storage is likely to be undertaken in depleted oil and gas fields, much larger saline aquifer formations are estimated to have sufficient capacity to securely contain 100 years of current UK fossil fuel power plant CO2 emissions. The CO2 Aquifer Storage Site Evaluation and Monitoring (CASSEM) project brings together the experience and different working practices of utilities, offshore operators, engineering contractors, and academic researchers to build collective understanding and develop expertise. CASSEM produced both new scientific knowledge and detailed insight into the CCS industry, developing best-value methods for the evaluation of saline aquifer formations for CO2 storage. Alongside work to assess the storage potential of two saline aquifer formations in close proximity to large coal power plant, CASSEM applied a novel Features, Events and Processes method to explore perceptions of risk in the work undertaken. This identified areas of industry and research community uncertainty and unfamiliarity to enable targeted investment of resource to reduce overall project risk. An openly accessible and flexible full chain (CO2 capture, transport and storage) costing model was developed allowing the CCS community to assess and explore overall costs. CASSEM's work also included the first use of citizen panels in the regions investigated for storage to assess public perception and educate the general public about CCS.

  • This dataset consists of measures of topsoil mineralisable nitrogen (Mineral-N) from soils sampled from up to 256 1km squares across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3bafb72b-9f2a-4cbc-a7b8-46e3731c6759

  • This dataset comprises characteristics of three-spined stickleback fish including length, weight, sex, condition factor (K-factor), cortisol and glucose concentration, RNA:DNA ratio and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity normalised to liver homogenate protein concentration. These data were collected by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology from three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) captured in the River Ray (south west England) at sites downstream of an urban waste water treatment works (Rodborne WWTW) prior to (2005-2007), and following (2008), remediation of the WWTW effluent with granular activated carbon (GAC) tertiary treatment. During the same period fish were also sampled from neighbouring reference rivers (R. Ock, Childrey Brook). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3322cccd-95fe-4cc9-baf8-48cddd03433d

  • This dataset consists of metal concentrations (aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, titanium and zinc) measured from soils sampled across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/826b0829-7ab5-4e22-822f-ee3a137896a9

  • Quaternary QUEST was led by Dr Tim Lenton at UEA, with a team of 10 co-investigators at the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Reading, Leeds, Bristol, Southampton and at UEA. This dataset contains FAMOUS (FAst Met Office/UK Universities Simulator) glacial cycle model data from 150,000 years ago to present. The project team aimed to compile a synthesis of palaeodata from sediments and ice cores, improve the synchronization of these records with each other, and use this greater understanding of the Earth’s ancient atmosphere to improve Earth system models simulating climate over very long timescales. A combined long-term data synthesis and modelling approach has helped to constrain some key mechanisms responsible for glacial-interglacial CO2 change, and Quaternary QUEST have narrowed the field of ocean processes that could have caused glacial CO2 drawdown.

  • DESIRE (Dynamics of the Earth System and the Ice-Core Record) was part of QUEST (Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System) Theme 2. This dataset contains measurements of sea temperature, salinity and elevation from the MITgcm (MIT General Circulation Model) model, as part of the Work Package 2.3. These experiments were conducted to investigate the role of changing the vertical tracer diffusivity on Drake Passage Transport (DPT) and the meridional overturning circulation (MOC).

  • The Assimilation in ocean and coupled models to determine the thermohaline circulation" project was a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) RAPID Climate Change Research Programme project (Round 2 - NE/C509058/1 - Duration 1 Sep 2005 - 30 Sep 2009) led by Prof Keith Haines of the University of Reading, with co-investigators at the National Oceanography Centre. This dataset collection contains Atlantic Ocean Thermohaline Circulation ORCA1 model data.

  • Cascade was a NERC funded consortium project to study organized convection and scale interactions in the tropical atmosphere using large domain cloud system resolving model simulations. The xfhfc simulation was made using the Met Office Unified Model (UM) at 4km resolution over the domain 40E-183E, 22S-22N which encompasses the Indian Ocean West Pacific Warm Pool. Cascade Warm Pool simulations coincide with the Year of Tropical Convection. This dataset contains Warm Pool 4km model measurements from xfhfc run.