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2008

218 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 218
  • This dataset contains fossil and modern pollen data collated during a workshop held in the UK in 2008 as part of the NERC (Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System) QUEST programme. The 96 sampling sites are located from 24°E (western Ukraine and Belarus) to easternmost Siberia, and lie north of latitude 40°N. The sample ages range from 21ka to present and are assigned to 1,000 year time slices. The dataset has been checked for consistent taxonomy and a redundancy-free taxonomy has been produced. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6aeba247-52d1-4e84-949f-603742af40c1

  • This dataset comprises characteristics of three-spined stickleback fish including length, weight, sex, condition factor (K-factor), cortisol and glucose concentration, RNA:DNA ratio and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity normalised to liver homogenate protein concentration. These data were collected by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology from three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) captured in the River Ray (south west England) at sites downstream of an urban waste water treatment works (Rodborne WWTW) prior to (2005-2007), and following (2008), remediation of the WWTW effluent with granular activated carbon (GAC) tertiary treatment. During the same period fish were also sampled from neighbouring reference rivers (R. Ock, Childrey Brook). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3322cccd-95fe-4cc9-baf8-48cddd03433d

  • This dataset consists of metal concentrations (aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, titanium and zinc) measured from soils sampled across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/826b0829-7ab5-4e22-822f-ee3a137896a9

  • This dataset consists of soil physico-chemical properties (pH, loss on ignition, bulk density, moisture content, carbon stock and concentration, total nitrogen, Olsen phosphorus) from soils sampled from up to 591 1km squares across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Please note: the use of Olsen P data, particularly in relation to acidic soils, is controversial. Please ensure these data are suitable for your requirements and exercise caution in their use. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/79669141-cde5-49f0-b24d-f3c6a1a52db8

  • Between 2001 and 2003 BGS received approximately 1400 1:25 000 paper maps and associated card index from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (now Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG)). The maps, originally compiled by the Minerals Division of the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (CLGs historic predecessor), contain hand drawn boundaries for permitted, withdrawn and refused mineral planning permissions, and worked ground. They also contain hand drawn boundaries for land use at each site. These 'MHLG' maps show information collated from the 1940s (retrospectively to 1930) to the mid 1980s. The index cards provide supplementary information regarding name, operator, dates and relevant local authority. Data depicted on the maps are for England only and include; [a] all planning appeals, departures and called in cases whether permitted or refused; [b] all planning permission and refusal data for various local authority areas which were obtained by Departmental officials through visits to authorities in a staged programme spread over many years. Priority was placed on areas that were giving rise to then current casework issues thus at the time when the maintenance of the maps ended (mid 1985), some authority information had been updated recently but other areas had not been visited for many years. [c] land use present at each site. Categories include: derelict areas, restored quarries (filled and unfilled), tip heaps and spoil heaps, and wet areas. The variable completeness of the data sets should be kept in mind when this material is being used. Land use polygons have been digitised from the MHLG maps and attribute information has been provided from the map legend and the appropriate card in the card index. The principal aim of the data is to show land use present in areas of land that have been affected by the extraction of minerals.

  • A superficial thickness model covering England Scotland and Wales. The model is derived by direct modelling (natural neighbour interpolation) of BGS Borehole records and BGS Digmap. For the purposes of modelling, superficial deposits include sediments deposited during the Quaternary, subsequent Holocene rivers and coastal systems and also modern anthropogenic material. i.e. deposits that are less than 2.6 million years old. Grids are overprinted with a minimum value so that areas where no bore data is present, but superficial deposits are known to occur are given a minimum 1.5m thickness. The superficial thickness model has been created as baseline datasets for the BGS Information Products programme. The model provides only a simple, mathematical interpretation of reality with some phantom points that improve the model mainly in valley areas where lack of data was given different results as those expected by a geological interpretation of the area. The complexity of Superficial deposits in Great Britain is such that it is only possible to model indicative values of thickness and elevation. The models should never be used as a substitute for thorough site investigation.

  • This dataset compromises chlorophyll data, which was collected using a Special Products Analysis Division (SPAD) 502 chorophyll meter, as part of the Network for Calibration and Validation of EO data 2006 Field Campaign. The estimates of chlorophyll amount were taken for the spring barley crop in Brockley field, near Chilbolton, this having been the only available field without seed heads and subsequently appropriate for measurements to be taken from. The numerical SPAD value is proportional to the amount of chlorophyll within the leaf, but a calibration equation for Spring Barley is required to convert these values into chlorophyll concentration. Each SPAD value in the file is an average of 10 values which were measured within 10 metres of the flag.

  • The Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC), is the result of a 10-year, $70 million strategic collaboration between Imperial College London, Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science and Technology Park, part of Qatar Foundation. We had a collective vision of QCCSRC initiating and maintaining with more than 80 academic staff, postdoctoral researchers and PhD students having been involved with the programme. QCCSRC's expertise takes place across numerous different areas, including geological field studies, experimental laboratory studies to help validate modelling and simulations at molecular to pore to field scales.

  • The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF, formerly Airborne Remote Sensing Facility) is managed by NERC Scientific Services and Programme Management. It provides the UK environmental science community, and other potential users, with the means to obtain remotely-sensed data in support of research, survey and monitoring programmes. The ARSF is a unique service providing environmental researchers, engineers and surveyors with synoptic analogue and digital imagery of high spatial and spectral resolution.The NEODC holds the entire archive of Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) data acquired by the NERC ARSF. High-resolution scanned digital versions of the entire collection of analogue photographs are now also available as well as selected LiDAR-derived elevation and terrain models for selected sites flown using the sensor.