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2009

69 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 69
  • The CASSEM project developed new methodologies, workflows and insights essential for the successful identification and evaluation of safe and effective CO2 storage sites in offshore saline aquifers. The project selected on-shore and/or near-shore sites from which useful analogue data and information was obtained in order to characterise important aquifer and cap rock systems. Such onshore data acquisition enables key information to be gathered (through outcrop and/or borehole sampling) at much lower cost than could be achieved for long-term offshore storage options.

  • GeoScholar is a set of free geological data - available in GIS format - for UK universities and the higher education sector, to support teaching and learning within the geosciences. The dataset includes digital geological map data from BGS, aerial photos from Infoterra, NEXTmap digital terrain model from Intermap Technologies, borehole data and their corresponding logs, several BGS geological map sheets. Each Geoscholar teaching package will include 12 different geographical regions, including Assynt, Coniston and South West Wales.

  • Chemical composition of freshwater samples from sites in Northern England. Measurements of pH, dissolved major ions (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Cl, NO3, SO4), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved Al, Fe(II) and total Fe, and measurements of Al, Fe(II) and total Fe on samples following dialysis.

  • This dataset contains the concentration of eleven antibiotics (trimethoprim, oxytetracycline, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, cefotaxime, doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, clarithromycin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin), three decongestants (naphazoline, oxymetazoline, xylometazoline) and the antiviral drug oseltamivir's active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate, measured at 21 locations within the River Thames catchment in England. The measurements were taken weekly during November 2009, once in March 2010 and once in May 2011, with the aim to quantify pharmaceutical usage during the influenza pandemic of 2009 and how this compares to inter-pandemic drug use. River samples were acquired by grab samples in glass jars and analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS). Two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in southern England (Benson and Oxford) were also sampled during the peak of the second wave of the 2009 influenza A[H1N1]pdm09 pandemic (10-11 November 2009) and on 15 May 2011 using an automated sampler set to acquired hourly (time proportional) samples from the influent and effluent of the WWTPs. The WWTPs are the source for all the drugs found in the river, hence, these were studied to understand the differential fate of the analytes in the two very different WWTPs. Flows for the WWTP and River sampling locations are presented for each of the sampling times to allow for determining hourly loads for the WWTP and daily loads for the river. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8af983e4-e97d-4c07-a34d-753243fa283b

  • The BGS Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry Scotland digital soil chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean topsoil concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb). The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) stream sediment data converted to top soil equivalent potentially harmful element(PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers Scotland but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

  • The dataset comprises of plant species recorded from plots located within the Moor House National Nature Reserve, with associated plot information such as slope and aspect, also peat depth. The sampling strategy was based on a grid, using 2 x 2 metre square plots. The majority of the plots were recorded in the summers of 2008 and 2009 by surveyors employed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7a7d08e3-48e2-4aad-855b-9d6767b9ae9b

  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry dataset. The BGS digital point source urban soil chemistry data (GB_PointSourceUrbanSoilPHE_v1) comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The data is derived from the national, high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also for assessing ecological risk. Although point source PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk, they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. The urban soil chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The point source data is based on an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

  • Contains 6 SCCS technical briefings, technical letters and technical journal responses - Working Paper 2010-04: Popular response to Economides, CO2 storage is feasible; Working Paper 2010-05: Formal response to Economides, CO2 storage is feasible; Working Paper 2010-07: Comment on Little and Jackson: Potential Impacts of Leakage from Deep CO2 Geosequestration on Overlying Freshwater Aquifers; Working Paper 2012-01: Comment by Stuart Haszeldine on Zoback and Gorelick; Working Paper 2014-01: Sleipner CO2 securely stored deep beneath seabed, in spite of unexpected Hugin fracture discovery; Working Paper 2015-02: Carbon Dioxide Transport Plans for Carbon Capture and Storage in the North Sea Region - A summary of existing studies and proposals applicable to the development of Projects of Common Interest.

  • Data comprise sub-hourly discharge measurements including mean stream height, discharge and stream temperature collected at station S2 on the Siksik stream, North West Territories, Canada, between September 2009 and March 2010. Measurements were taken at a field site based at SikSik Creek a small sub-catchment of the Trail Valley Creek, approximately 60km north of Inuvik. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ee887d3-aabd-4fb7-b48e-056229a15c6f

  • CO2GeoNet is the European scientific authority dealing with all aspects of geological storage of CO2, durably engaged in enabling the safe and efficient deployment of the CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) technology in order to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. www.co2geonet.com