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2009

228 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 228
  • CO2GeoNet is the European scientific authority dealing with all aspects of geological storage of CO2, durably engaged in enabling the safe and efficient deployment of the CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) technology in order to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. www.co2geonet.com

  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry dataset. The BGS digital point source urban soil chemistry data (GB_PointSourceUrbanSoilPHE_v1) comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The data is derived from the national, high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also for assessing ecological risk. Although point source PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk, they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. The urban soil chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The point source data is based on an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

  • The BGS Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry Scotland digital soil chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean topsoil concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb). The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) stream sediment data converted to top soil equivalent potentially harmful element(PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers Scotland but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

  • The CASSEM project developed new methodologies, workflows and insights essential for the successful identification and evaluation of safe and effective CO2 storage sites in offshore saline aquifers. The project selected on-shore and/or near-shore sites from which useful analogue data and information was obtained in order to characterise important aquifer and cap rock systems. Such onshore data acquisition enables key information to be gathered (through outcrop and/or borehole sampling) at much lower cost than could be achieved for long-term offshore storage options.

  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry England and Wales dataset. This dataset indicates the estimated topsoil Arsenic(As), Cadmium (Cd), Cr (Chromium), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) concentrations (mg kg-1) derived by spatial interpolation of the point source urban soil PHE (potentially harmful elements) data. Urban soil geochemical data generally have large positive skewness coefficients so were transformed by taking natural logarithms. To overcome the bias associated with traditional measures of location (mean) and scale (standard deviation) for log-normal data, the inverse distance weighted (IDW) mean and standard deviation of log transformed element concentrations were used for mapping the spatial variation in As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb concentrations. The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) soil geochemical data where these are available. Elsewhere the stream sediment data are converted to surface soil equivalent potentially harmful element(PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers England and Wales but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry Scotland dataset. The BGS digital soil chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in surface soil. The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) soil geochemical data where these are available. Elsewhere the stream sediment data are converted to surface soil equivalent potentially harmful element(PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers Scotland but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

  • Contains 6 SCCS technical briefings, technical letters and technical journal responses - Working Paper 2010-04: Popular response to Economides, CO2 storage is feasible; Working Paper 2010-05: Formal response to Economides, CO2 storage is feasible; Working Paper 2010-07: Comment on Little and Jackson: Potential Impacts of Leakage from Deep CO2 Geosequestration on Overlying Freshwater Aquifers; Working Paper 2012-01: Comment by Stuart Haszeldine on Zoback and Gorelick; Working Paper 2014-01: Sleipner CO2 securely stored deep beneath seabed, in spite of unexpected Hugin fracture discovery; Working Paper 2015-02: Carbon Dioxide Transport Plans for Carbon Capture and Storage in the North Sea Region - A summary of existing studies and proposals applicable to the development of Projects of Common Interest.

  • The dataset contains information on the species identity and frequency of all insect-flower interactions recorded in 10 birch (Betula spp.) woodland fragments surveyed in 2009 (May-August). The data were collected in two transects (50 x 2m; 15m apart and at least 50m from the woodland edge) randomly situated prior to the onset of flowering in the centre of each wood. Five of the woodland sites were disturbed by cattle grazing, while five were undisturbed. Landowners confirmed that livestock had been absent for at least 70-100 years in undisturbed sites. Where livestock were present, cattle grazing was light to moderate (e.g. 2007: mean = 8.4 cattle ha-1) and long term (mean = 33 years). The dataset comprises 13 columns, 2002 rows and is 218 KB. It gives the site name, geographic coordinates, whether it was disturbed by cattle grazing or not, the wind speed and temperature at time of sampling, the date of sampling, and the identity of the insect and plants interacting (binomial name or recognisable taxonomic unit). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c058d1f-6166-4606-88a2-d2feaf036a2f

  • Soil moisture and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements within the top metre of soil at Church Field, Chimney Meadow National Nature Reserve. Church Field lies on a clay lens which overlies surrounding sand and gravel soils. Apart from the A and B horizons, the clay was found to be fairly homogenous down to the maximum depth of 1.1m of the access pit. On the 1:250,000 Soil Map of South East England the location falls into the soils category 832 Kelmscott Association which comprise mostly permeable fine loamy soils over limestone gravel and variably affected by groundwater and with some risk of flooding. However, on the more detailed 1:25,000 scale Sand and Gravel Resources Map of the Thames Valley the clay lens is depicted as Oxford Clay substrate without sand and gravel cover, surrounded by sand and gravel terraces cropping out at the surface. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59da8e86-04cc-4f46-a23c-65513d025326

  • The BGS digital estimated urban soil chemistry data (GB_EstimatedUrbanSoilChemistry_v3) indicates the estimated geometric mean concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in topsoil derived by spatial interpolation of the point source urban soil chemistry data. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also assessing ecological risks. Estimated topsoil PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk but they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data set with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The dataset is based on, and limited to, an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created. An indication of high estimated PHE concentrations in soil does not necessarily mean that an individual site will have a high PHE concentration. Topsoil concentrations in urban areas are frequently characterised by strong spatial variation over short distances so this data should be interpreted and used with caution. The original urban topsoil samples were collected and analysed as part of the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project.