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2010

516 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 516
  • The map shows the potential for the rocks to supply groundwater and the type of groundwater flow within the rocks. The dataset reattributes polygons in the Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain - 625k (DiGMapGB-625) Bedrock version 5 dataset to indicate whether the bedrock is an aquifer, the type of flow through the aquifer (fracture and fissure flow or intergranular flow) and how productive the aquifer is likely to be. The dataset is based on the known hydrogeological properties of rock types. The dataset covers just the bedrock formations for the UK and the Isle of Man. The data can be used for planning, environmental analysis, water supply and hazards.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of mass movement e.g. landslip. The scale of the data is 1:10 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial with approximately 30% of England, Scotland and Wales available in the version 2 data release. BGS intend to continue developing coverage at this scale; current focus is to include all large priority urban areas, along with road and rail transport corridors. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The RISCS (Research into Impacts and Safety in CO2 Storage) project assessed the potential environmental impacts of leakage from geological CO2 storage. Consideration was given to possible impacts on groundwater resources and on near surface ecosystems both onshore and offshore. The aim of the project was to assist storage site operators and regulators in assessing the potential impacts of leakage so that these could be considered during all phases of a storage project (project design, site characterisation, site operation, post-operation and site abandonment, and following transfer of liability back to the state). A secondary objective was to inform policy makers, politicians and the general public of the feasibility and long-term benefits and consequences of large-scale CO2 capture and storage (CCS) deployment. RISCS was a 4 year project supported by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme. Project website http://www.riscs-co2.eu.

  • This web map service (WMS) depicts estimates of mean values of soil bacteria, invertebrates, carbon, nutrients and pH within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB . Estimates were made using CS data using a mixed model approach. The estimated means of habitat/parent material combinations using 2007 data are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. Bacteria data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes bacterial community structure as assessed by ordination scores. Invertebrate data is representative of 0 - 8 cm soil depth and includes Total catch, Mite:Springtail ratio, Number of broad taxa and Shannon diversity. Gravimetric moisture content (%) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth Carbon data is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth and includes Loss-on-ignition (%), Carbon concentration (g kg-1) and Carbon density (t ha-1). Loss-on-ignition was determined by combustion of 10g dry soil at 375 deg C for 16 hours; carbon concentration was estimated by multiplying LOI by a factor of 0.55, and carbon density was estimated by combining carbon concentration with bulk density estimates. Nutrient data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes total nitrogen (N) concentration (%), C:N ratio and Olsen-Phosphorus (mg/kg). pH and bulk density (g cm-3) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth. Topsoil pH was measured using 10g of field moist soil with 25ml de-ionised water giving a ratio of soil to water of 1:2.5 by weight; bulk density was estimated by making detailed weight measurements throughout the soil processing procedure. Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat/parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values.

  • The data are biomass measurements from an ozone exposure experiment, during which Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne were exposed as both monocultures and two-species mixtures to an episodic rural ozone regime in large, well-watered containers within solardomes for 12 weeks. Treatments were elevated ozone (AOT40 (Accumulated Ozone Threshold exposure of 40 parts per billion) of 12.86 ppm h) or control conditions (AOT40 of 0.02 ppm h). Measurements were dry weight, with a cutting height of 7cm above soil level. The distribution of plant material within the canopy was determined by separating material growing in the upper canopy (>14cm) from the canopy edge and the inner canopy for both species. The experiments were carried out in the CEH Bangor Air Pollution Facility. Work was funded by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Integrating Fund Initiative. The observed decreases in photosynthetic efficiency and capacity in elevated ozone indicate that the ability of such ubiquitous vegetation to act as a sink for atmospheric carbon may be reduced in future climates. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5de90f7a-dec9-4bd5-af52-d0873a09d25d

  • Data are of speed and accuracy of decision making in stickleback fish of different personalities. A laboratory population of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were repeatedly tested in a T-maze. The work was carried out between March 2012 and February 2013 at The Structure and Motion Laboratory, Royal Veterinary College. The work was funded by a BBSRC studentship, NERC ( grant NE/H016600/2 Does diversity deliver? How variation in individual knowledge and behavioural traits impact on the performance of animal groups) and The Royal Society (RG 110401) All animal care and experimental procedures described here were approved as non-regulatory procedures by the Ethics and Welfare Committee of the Royal Veterinary College, London (URN 2011 1084). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ed2ab55-0688-4513-be9a-f9f0f21d2788

  • Data includes raw shoot biomass and yield, production and gas exchange, nodulation and N-fixation and forage quality data, including relative and consumable food values. The impacts of ozone on the growth and functioning of high-sugar ryegrass pasture mesocosms was assessed in year 2013. Pasture mesocosms, containing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L) and white clover (Trifolium repens L), were grown in the early spring and exposed to ozone in solardomes from late April 2013 to the end of September 2013. Ozone (30, 35, 40, 45, 52, 67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment means) had a large effect on the pasture mesocosms. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e0bcdc39-ab79-413c-bf76-d6ffbc510f15

  • This data set comprises of hourly physical and nutrient monitoring data of The Cut at Bray Marina (National grid reference SU915786), from May 2010 to February 2012. Parameters measured are total phosphorus, total reactive phosphorus, ammonium, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and total chlorophyll. The accompanying hourly averaged flow data (from the EA flow gauging station at Binfield, approximately 10 km upstream of the monitoring site) are also supplied. The monitoring programme was funded by the EPSRC, through the LIMPIDS project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/abe4dd7c-a340-4595-a57f-8c1446ff7656

  • The dataset consists of ACi (net CO2 assimilation rate, A, versus calculated substomatal CO2 concentration, Ci) curve data from an ozone experiment during which Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne were exposed as both monocultures and two-species mixtures to an episodic rural ozone regime in large, well-watered containers within solardomes for 12 weeks. Treatments were elevated ozone (AOT40 (Accumulated Ozone Threshold exposure of 40 parts per billion) of 12.86 ppm h) or control conditions (AOT40 of 0.02 ppm h). ACi curves were carried out mid-way and at the end of the exposure period using a Portable Photosynthesis System, CIRAS (PP-Systems) to calculate the photosynthetic parameters Jmax (maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport) and Vcmax (maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylase activity). The observed decreases in photosynthetic efficiency and capacity in elevated ozone indicate that the ability of such ubiquitous vegetation to act as a sink for atmospheric carbon may be reduced in future climates. The experiment was carried out at the CEH Bangor Air Pollution Facility. This work was funded by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Integrating Fund Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f14b9056-ccc0-4887-812e-c004f613a138

  • This datset contains operational taxonomic units for epilithon eukaryotes (water samples): Approximate location of sampling sites was determined from maps to provide good spatial coverage of the Wold River through to the Tamar River. Exact sites were determined in the field, considering accessibility and other logistics. The exact location of each sample site was determined using a Garmin GPS12. Three stones were taken from each of the 20 locations and epilithon removed from a defined area. Samples were kept in the cold and removed to the laboratory for analyses. DNA was extracted from all soil and epilithon samples using the MOBIO Powersoil 96 well DNA extraction kit. DNA was quality checked for purity and yield prior to submission for 454 pyrosequencing to assess both bacterial and eukaryotic biodiversity within each sample. Following bioinformatic sequence processing, sequencing were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTU) and the data tables display the percentage of each OTU within each sample. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/18023db5-25d8-44f7-b291-61869f937367