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2010

460 record(s)
 
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  • This data set comprises of hourly physical and nutrient monitoring data of The Cut at Bray Marina (National grid reference SU915786), from May 2010 to February 2012. Parameters measured are total phosphorus, total reactive phosphorus, ammonium, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and total chlorophyll. The accompanying hourly averaged flow data (from the EA flow gauging station at Binfield, approximately 10 km upstream of the monitoring site) are also supplied. The monitoring programme was funded by the EPSRC, through the LIMPIDS project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/abe4dd7c-a340-4595-a57f-8c1446ff7656

  • These spatial layers contain risk factors and overall risk scores, representing relative risk of Phytophthora infection (Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae), for Core Native Woodland and known larch fragments across Scotland. Risk factors include climate suitability, proximity to road and river networks and suitability of habitat for key hosts of Phytophthora and were broadly concurrent with the period between 2007 and 2013. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study of the epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in managed gardens and heathlands in Scotland' and involved collaborators from St Andrews University, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/29726cda-09f5-4661-8fd4-ddaa5555466a

  • This dataset provides the location details of Environmental Change Network (ECN) sites from which data are collected. There are 12 terrestrial sites and 45 freshwater sites. Sites range from upland to lowland, moor land to chalk grassland, small ponds and streams to large rivers and lakes. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. A wide range of integrated physical, chemical and biological variables which drive and respond to environmental change are collated, quality controlled and made freely available for scientific research. The data form an important evidence base for UK environmental policy development. ECN is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site monitoring and/or network co-ordination activities. These organisations are: Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru - Natural Resources Wales, Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Environment Agency, Forestry Commission, Llywodraeth Cymru - Welsh Government, Natural England, Natural Environment Research Council, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage.

  • The RISCS (Research into Impacts and Safety in CO2 Storage) project assessed the potential environmental impacts of leakage from geological CO2 storage. Consideration was given to possible impacts on groundwater resources and on near surface ecosystems both onshore and offshore. The aim of the project was to assist storage site operators and regulators in assessing the potential impacts of leakage so that these could be considered during all phases of a storage project (project design, site characterisation, site operation, post-operation and site abandonment, and following transfer of liability back to the state). A secondary objective was to inform policy makers, politicians and the general public of the feasibility and long-term benefits and consequences of large-scale CO2 capture and storage (CCS) deployment. RISCS was a 4 year project supported by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme. Project website http://www.riscs-co2.eu.

  • QICS (Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage) was a program funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with support from the Scottish Government (May 2010 - December 2014) with two objectives. Firstly, to assess if any significant environmental impact would arise, if a leak from sub-sea, deep geological storage of carbon dioxide occurred. Secondly, to test and recommend tools and strategies for monitoring for (or assuring the absence of) leakage at the sea floor and in overlying waters. This data set provides a short overview of the novel experimental procedure - a world first leakage simulation in the natural environment and describes the experimental set up, sampling strategy including both temporal and spatial details. The data set consists of a pdf containing a text based project and experimental overview, a table outlining the temporal evolution of the experiment, including site selection, set up, baseline, impact and recovery phases and a diagram outlining the spatial sampling strategy. This data set contains an overview document collated by Plymouth Marine Laboratory. This provides the context for a number of specific related QICS datasets submitted to the UKCCS data archive, covering a range of geological, chemical and ecological information. QICS project website: www.bgs.ac.uk/qics/home.html. Blackford et al., 2014. Detection and impacts of leakage from sub-seafloor deep geological carbon dioxide storage. Nature Climate Change 4, 1011-1016. DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE2381. Taylor et al., 2015. A novel sub-seabed CO2 release experiment informing monitoring and impact assessment for geological carbon storage. Int J Greenhouse Gas Control. DOI:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.09.007.

  • This dataset contains operational taxonomic units for epilithon (water samples): Approximate location of sampling sites was determined from maps to provide good spatial coverage of the Wold River through to the Tamar River. Exact sites were determined in the field, considering accessibility and other logistics. The exact location of each sample site was determined using a Garmin GPS12. Three stones were taken from each of the 20 locations and epilithon removed from a defined area. Samples were kept in the cold and removed to the laboratory for analyses. DNA was extracted from all soil and epilithon samples using the MOBIO Powersoil 96 well DNA extraction kit. DNA was quality checked for purity and yield prior to submission for 454 pyrosequencing to assess both bacterial and eukaryotic biodiversity within each sample. Following bioinformatic sequence processing, sequencing were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTU) and the data tables display the percentage of each OTU within each sample. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/16649ff0-af24-41b0-bcb4-15e610dac170

  • This datset contains operational taxonomic units for epilithon eukaryotes (water samples): Approximate location of sampling sites was determined from maps to provide good spatial coverage of the Wold River through to the Tamar River. Exact sites were determined in the field, considering accessibility and other logistics. The exact location of each sample site was determined using a Garmin GPS12. Three stones were taken from each of the 20 locations and epilithon removed from a defined area. Samples were kept in the cold and removed to the laboratory for analyses. DNA was extracted from all soil and epilithon samples using the MOBIO Powersoil 96 well DNA extraction kit. DNA was quality checked for purity and yield prior to submission for 454 pyrosequencing to assess both bacterial and eukaryotic biodiversity within each sample. Following bioinformatic sequence processing, sequencing were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTU) and the data tables display the percentage of each OTU within each sample. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/18023db5-25d8-44f7-b291-61869f937367

  • The data are biomass and ozone-injury data for white clover (Trifolium repens). Dataset concerns a 2014 study on the effects of Jasmonic acid/cutting in modulating the response of clover to ozone. A short-term (4-week) ozone-exposure experiment was conducted in 2014 to investigate the interactive effects of cutting on ozone-induced responses in white clover (Trifolium repens). A strong interaction was found in root biomass and root nodule biomass in cut white clover plants in a high ozone background (45-67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment mean), suggesting ozone-impacts on root nodule biomass occur through limitation of carbon availability. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/10c6df00-c7ef-444b-951f-33a2c0072bec

  • This is a web map service (WMS) of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data in South West England at a 1m resolution. The DTM covers an area of 9424 km2 that includes all the land west of Exmouth (i.e. west of circa 3 degrees 21 minutes West). The DTM represents the topographic model (height) of the bare earth. The dataset is a part of outcomes from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology South West (SW) Project.

  • Data includes impacts on root nodule biomass, stomatal conductance, injury rates, and N-fixation in the white clover cultivar (T. repens cv. crusader). An ozone-exposure experiment was conducted in solardomes during the spring and summer of year 2012 on modern clover (Trifolium spp.) cultivars. The effects of ozone pollution (30, 35, 40, 45, 52, 67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment means) on the growth and functioning of the clover cultivars was investigated. Both cultivars had positive increases in ozone-injury rates, although stomatal conductance was unaffected by ozone exposure. Reductions in root nodule biomass and nodule number occurred in white clover, and red clover displayed an increase in nodule density. Nitrogen fixation rates were suppressed in white clover, which could have important implications for the sustainability of managed pasture. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b63fbb6c-5030-43a1-b0ea-160bb5a83078