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2013

522 record(s)
 
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  • This presentation on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Determination of water Solubility in CO2 Mixtures, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 22.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-21.

  • This presentation on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Flexible CCS Network Development, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 22.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-40.

  • There were a number of aims of this project - to develop initial flowsheets and designs for CLC with oxygen uncoupling; to model and design reactors; and to produce and test a variety of novel materials for CLC with oxygen uncoupling. The project has succeeded in a number of aims; to develop and test materials (Cambridge), to conduct an initial test of CLC with oxygen uncoupling (the first at scale in the UK, conducted at Cranfield, and the major stated aim of the project - see Figure 2-13), and to model and develop a novel reactor for CLC with oxygen uncoupling (Imperial). Overall, these aspects exceeded the initial project brief. Initial time-dependent flowsheets were developed at Cambridge for CLC processes - unfortunately key staff loss led to a significant hiatus in the activity. Industrial reviewing was limited because of the challenges in developing the flowsheeting activity.

  • The data consists of an extended abstract submitted to 'The Fourth International Conference on Fault and Top Seals', Almeria, Spain, 20-24th September 2015. The abstract describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The CO2-rich St. Johns Dome reservoir in Arizona provides a useful analogue for leaking CO2 storage sites, and the abstract describes an analysis of the fault-seal behaviour at the site. http://earthdoc.eage.org/publication/publicationdetails/?publication=82673.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project CO2 storage in Palaeogene and Neogene hydrogeological systems of the North Sea: preparation of an IODP scientific drilling bid was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-30. The North Sea Basin (NSB) is considered to be suitable for commercial-scale CO2 storage, due to its favourable geological setting, its proximity to sources, and pioneering operational experience storing CO2 at the Sleipner injection site. The shallow Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the NSB form the overburden and seal to these underlying CO2 reservoirs but are under-researched, even though the NSB is a mature petroleum system, penetrated by many thousands of wells. Quaternary sediments, up to 1000 metres thick, are in general bypassed to reach the deeper, profitable hydrocarbon resources. UKCCSRC and CLIMIT programme funded scientific, governmental and industrial partners from the UK and Norway to collaborate with the purpose of submitting a proposal to the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) for scientific drilling to investigate the overburden to CO2 storage strata.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Chemical looping for low-cost oxygen production and other applications was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-39. The project is based on the concept of CLOU (chemical looping oxygen uncoupling). Various forms of chemical looping are possible with different degrees of integration between the oxygen release and the thermal energy production cycles. • Most of the CLC and CLOU processes proposed thus far are conducted in a fluidised bed reactor encountering problems of contamination of the oxygen carrier and fuel leakage. • The project has designed a hybrid form of chemical looping that achieves the optimal degree of integration of oxygen release and thermal energy production. • The need for intimate contact between the oxygen carrier and the solid fuel is also avoided.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Flexible CCS Network Development (FleCCSnet) was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-40. The aim of the project was to carry out research to enable the production of design and operating guidelines for CCS pipeline networks in order that these networks can react effectively to short, medium and long term variations in the availability and flow of CO2 from capture plants and also to the constraints imposed on the system by the ability (or otherwise) of CO2 storage facilities to accept variable flow. The amount of CO2 captured at a power station is expected to become more variable in the future as the electricity grid brings in more and more intermittent renewable energy (meaning a conventional power station is temporarily not needed or in reduced operation as the renewable energy takes precedent). The storage site will also face periods of maintenance which will impose constraints on the flow into the store and it is also important to look at the case of upset conditions in order to be able to predict any potential problems. Solutions to these all these issues need to be factored into the design of the CCS network, the focus of the project was to identify the issues surrounding flexibility and explore some of them.

  • This presentation on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project 3D Mapping of Large-Scale Subsurface Flow Pathways using Nanoseismic Monitoring was presented at the UKCCSRC Manchester Biannual Meeting, 13.04.2016. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-19.

  • These data show images recorded using a variety of methods of a model system of bacterial metal reduction. In all cases the bacteria grew from a pure culture of Geobacter sulfurreducens, and grew undisturbed on thin films of amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide – ferrihydrite. The different imaging methodologies have highlighted different features of this interaction. AFM shows the surface texture of the bacteria and ferrihydrite films; epifluorescence was used to allow counting of the cells at different time points from 0 to 12 days post inoculation (cell counts available in excel spreadsheet); and confocal imaging allow visualisation of the redox patterns surrounding cells and to identify areas of bioreduced Fe(II) (quantification of Fe(II) available in excel spreadsheet). The following data is included: 1. 9 x AFM images of Geobacter sulfurreducens bacteria growing on ferrihydrite films 2. 5 x epifluorescence images of Geobacter sulfurreducens bacteria growing on ferrihydrite films over time 3. spreadsheet bacterial counts associated with epifluorescence images 4. 7 x confocal images of Geobacter sulfurreducens bacteria growing on ferrihydrite films with redox green staining of appendages 5. 5 x example confocal images of Geobacter sulfurreducens bacteria growing on ferrihydrite films with Fe(II) highlighted by RhoNox-1 6. Spreadsheet of quanitfication of RhoNox intensity against bacteria and Fe co-location Data is presented which shows the formation of precious metal nanoparticles on the surface of geobacter sulfurreducens cells. The images were produced by CryoTEM. Full details of the experiment are available in this publication http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ppsc.201600073/full 7. Powerpoint presentation of TEM images of precious metal nanoparticles formed on the surface of Geobacter cells

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project QICS2 Scoping Project: Exploring the Viability and Scientific Opportunities of a Follow-On Marine Impact Project was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-31. The world's first sub-seabed CO2 release experiment was completed in 2014, offshore from Oban (Scotland). The project, known as QICS (Quantifying and Monitoring Potential Ecosystem Impacts of Geological Storage), mimicked the formation of a small-scale CO2 leak into sediments near the seabed. In 2012, CO2 was continuously injected into the sediments for 37 days, releasing a total of 4.2 tonnes of CO2. The QICS1 experiment was first of its kind, and was highly successful, enabling: i. field testing of monitoring technologies to detect CO2 against a measured baseline ii. assessment of environmental and ecosystem impacts of leaked CO2 (within the sediment and water column) iii. the flow and fate of CO2 in sediments, and dispersion and dilution of CO2 in seawater, to be explored.