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2015

209 record(s)
 
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  • This dataset details the paternity of progeny from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Plants were genotyped at seven microsatellite markers before being introduced across the study site to form experimental arrays. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). Upon maturation approximately 10 seeds were collected from each plant and genotyped. Fragment analysis was conducted and alleles were scored on Genemarker. Seeds were then manually scored as outcrossed or selfed and paternity was determined using Cervus. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7b721c07-bc38-4815-8669-4675867663d0

  • **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1**The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGIP evaluates these hazards using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The newGIP is made up of 3 components. 1. Derived Postcode Database (DPD): this dataset contains generalised information at a postcode level and it’s updated on a 6 monthly basis. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. This product uses Code-Point® Open data to relate postcodes to Ordnance Survey grid references. This dataset is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 2. Unified Hazards (Vector Dataset): This is a detailed vector dataset providing spatial GIS information that can be used for more specific analysis at a higher resolution (e.g. site/address specific at 1:50k resolution). This dataset also has additional attributes outlining the type and scale of the potential hazards at any one location. This dataset is updated with the release of each version of DiGMapGB-50 and is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 3. Unified Hazards (Gridded Dataset): This dataset consists of a raster grid derived from the vector dataset; however, due to the raster grid format, the grid only carries limited attribution. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution.

  • In this study, two strategies, thermal pretreatment and chemical doping, were investigated as a method of improving the residual carrying capacity of Longcliffe and Havelock limestone for calcium looping systems. Four parameters were varied during thermal pretreatment: temperature (900-1100 degrees C), time (3-12 hr), gas composition (0-100 % CO2 balanced in N2) and particle size (90-355 micrometre). After pre-calcination, the sorbents were subjected to 20 carbonation-calcination cycles performed in a thermographic analyser (TGA) to monitor any signs of sorbent improvement. The degradation of sorbent activity was modelled using the decay equation suggested by Grasa and Abanades (2006). Both Longcliffe and Havelock samples showed self-reactivation when pretreated under CO2, however this did not result in a greater carrying capacity after 20 carbonation/calcination cycles compared to the untreated limestone. For chemical doping, Longcliffe doped using 0.167 mol % HBr via quantitative wet impregnation method resulted in an increase in residual carrying capacity of 27.4 % after thermal pre-treatment under CO2 when compared to the untreated but doped limestone, assuming self-reactivation continued as modelled. When Longcliffe was doped and then pretreated under pure N2, the limestone showed self-reactivation, which was not seen in the undoped sorbent when also pretreated under N2. Thus, the success of pretreatment may be dependent on the chemical composition of the limestone. Finally, BET surface area and BJH pore volume analysis was used to understand the changes in the sorbents' morphologies. The closure of the mesopores (dpore<150 nm) after the pretreatment was correlated to the self-reactivation in the subsequent cycles.

  • Major and trace elemental analysis of sulphide samples from the Beebe Vent Field. Geographical area - Beebe Vent Field, Cayman Trough, 18°32.798N,81°43.092W

  • This dataset is a characterisation of discontinuity types found within rocks and soils in Great Britain. Discontinuities are breaks, fractures or planes of weakness in the rock mass. The dataset includes type, frequency and orientation of discontinuities within rock and soil materials at formation (local to regional) scale. The discontinuities are classified in 3 categories: stratification (bedding planes), foliation (mineral banding) and rock mass description. The dataset aims to facilitate the preliminary research for planning and design of buildings, infrastructure and resource extraction. It forms part of the DiGMap Plus dataset series of GIS layers which describes the engineering properties of materials from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m depth (ie the uppermost c.2m of geology). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core engineering characteristics relating to their lithologies.

  • This dataset contains seed counts of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to form experimental arrays within habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). On each plant, the seed set was measured for flowers which were exposed and excluded from pollinators to determine the effects of habitat context on plant reproduction. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b400b69-b828-45e8-b04e-7ccbfdb0987f

  • Scanned images of well logs for oil and gas exploration and appraisal wells drilled on the UK Continental Shelf and held on behalf of the Oil & Gas Authority (formerly the Department of Energy and Climate Change).

  • 2 papers and supplementary information produced from NERC Grant NE/I006427/1. Lear, C. H., H. K. Coxall, G. L. Foster, D. J. Lunt, E. M. Mawbey, Y. Rosenthal, S. M. Sosdian, E. Thomas, and P. A. Wilson (2015), Neogene ice volume and ocean temperatures: Insights from infaunal foraminiferal Mg/Ca paleothermometry, Paleoceanography, 30, 1437–1454, doi:10.1002/2015PA002833. Elaine M. Mawbey, Caroline H. Lear; Carbon cycle feedbacks during the Oligocene-Miocene transient glaciation. Geology ; 41 (9): 963–966. doi: https://doi.org/10.1130/G34422.1

  • Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

  • Offprints of articles relating to Geomagnetism from 1822 to 1981. Offprints collected by Kew Observatory, Meteorological Office, Edinburgh and Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux castle). The first page of each offprint has been digitised to produce a finding aid.