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2016

510 record(s)
 
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  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Site indices, as a relative measure of the actual population size, for UK butterfly species calculated from data from the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Site indices are a relative rather than an absolute measure of the size of a population, and have been shown to relate closely to other, more intensive, measures of population size such as mark, release, recapture (MRR) methods. The site index can be thought of as a relative measure of the actual population size, being a more or less constant proportion of the number of butterflies present. The proportion seen is likely to vary according to species; some butterfly species are more conspicuous and thus more easily detected, whereas others are much less easy to see. Site indices are only calculated at sites with sufficient monitoring visits throughout the season, or for targeted reduced effort surveys (timed observations, larval web counts and egg counts) where counts are generally obtained as close to the peak of the flight period as possible and are subsequently adjusted for the time of year and size of the site (area of suitable habitat type for a given species). Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey (WCBS) sites are thus excluded because they are based on very few visits from which accurate indices of abundance cannot currently be calculated. For transect sites a statistical model (a General Additive Model, 'GAM') is used to impute missing values and to calculate a site index. Each year most transect sites (over 90%) produce an index for at least one species and in recent years site indices are calculated for almost 1,500 sites across the UK. Site indices are subsequently collated to contribute to the overall 'Collated Index' for each species, which are relative measures of the abundance of each species across a geographical area, for example, across the whole UK or at country level in England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Individual site indices are important in informing conservation management as not all sites show the same patterns for each species and likely reflect a combination of local climate and habitat management at the site. Although the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) are responsible for the calculation and interpretation of site indices, the collection of the data used in its creation is ultimately reliant on a large volunteer community. The UKBMS is run by Butterfly Conservation (BC), the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), in partnership with the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC), and supported and steered by Forestry Commission (FC), Natural England(NE), Natural Resources Wales (NRW), Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA), and Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). The UKBMS is indebted to all volunteers who contribute data to the scheme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0f64d554-b36f-484a-a231-b6526796877a

  • Data identifies landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of artificial or man-made ground. It indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Types of artificial ground include: Disturbed ground areas of ill-defined shallow or near surface mineral workings where distinction cannot be made between made and worked ground. Infilled ground areas where original geology has been removed and then wholly or partially back filled includes waste or landfill sites. Landscaped ground areas where surface has been reshaped includes former sand and gravel workings for recreation and amenity use. Made ground man made features including embankments and spoil heaps. Worked ground areas where ground has been removed including quarries and road cuttings. Disturbed ground areas of ill-defined shallow or near surface mineral workings where distinction cannot be made between made and worked ground. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the constantly changing nature of land use and re-use/redevelopment, caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Data from two small streams, two rivers and rainfall fractions in the Western Amazonian basin at Tambopata National Reserve in Madre de Dios region, Peru. Data presented are nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) and fluvial carbon - dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its isotopic composition δ13C-DIC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Samples were collected during the period from February 2011 to May 2012 targeting both wet and dry seasons. Samples for DIC samples were collected using pre-acidified evacuated Exetainers. Established standard methods were used to take samples for DOC and nutrients. Established standard methods were used to analyse samples for DIC, DOC and nutrients These methods are outlined in the lineage. The samples were taken to understand the hydrological controls on the carbon concentrations and fluxes during different flow conditions. The data collection was carried out as part of the Natural Environment Research Council funded Amazonica project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ee1b9eb7-6fbd-4dd5-8f8f-e07d32c057e4

  • This data set consists of measurements of areas of landscape features and associated attributes from sites across Wales, collected between 2013 and 2016. Data are presented as areas of Broad (or Priority) Habitats, with associated landscape attributes (such as plant species and land use), within a set of 300 x 1km squares across Wales, collected as part of the Glastir Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (GMEP). The monitoring programme was set up by the Welsh Government in 2013 to monitor the effects of the Glastir agri-environment scheme on the environment and ran from 2013 to 2016. The field survey element was based on a stratified random sampling design of 300 x 1km square sites across Wales, and was managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/82c63533-529e-47b9-8e78-51b27028cc7f

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset provides the details of all sites which have been monitored as part of the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Data includes the location within the UK, the length and width of the line transect on each site, and how long the transect has been monitored. The UKBMS started in 1976 with fewer than 50 sites. The number of sites monitored each year has increased to over a thousand since 2008. There is turnover in sites monitored each year and details of the first and last year in which each site was surveyed are given. The majority of site data is provided by recorders at the time a transect is created. The majority of these recorders are volunteers. The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) collate the data and the UKBMS is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/814c6d77-1a16-4e94-bcf2-73823e3240fd

  • The dataset comprises net primary productivity (NPP) measured as kilogrammes of dry above-ground vegetation per square metre per year. Sampling was conducted at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 metre (m) (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 m, 10-100 m and 100-1000 m. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England. NPP measurements were based on vegetation re-growth after cutting in winter 2013 and harvesting in summer 2013. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS). The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2cbe3a8c-1a54-490d-a32d-078564c117b7

  • The dataset comprises the electrical conductivity of a 10 gram soil sample from the top 5 centimetre (cm) of soil taken within each 1metre (m) x 1m quadrat. Sampling was conducted at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 m (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 m, 10-100 m and 100-1000 m. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England. The Morecambe Bay samples were taken during the winter and summer of 2013. The Essex samples were taken during the winter, early spring and summer of 2013. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e763d84c-8ac2-4be5-8598-b2cf801367ce

  • The dataset comprises the field soil organic matter content as a percentage at three depth zones (roughly 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm), measured from bulk density soil samples taken within each 1metre x 1metre quadrat. Prior to measurement of bulk density all soil samples were dried at 105°C for 72 hours. A sub-sample was then taken and dried at 375°C for 16 hours to determine the percentage organic matter of dry soil. Sampling was conducted at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 metre (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 metres, 10-100 metres and 100-1000 metres. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England. The Morecambe Bay samples were taken during the winter and summer of 2013. The Essex samples were taken during the winter, early spring and summer of 2013. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/90457ba1-f291-4158-82dc-425d7cbb1ac5

  • This dataset is the Derived Postcode Database issued as part of the GeoSure Insurance V7 incorporating postcode data from OS Code-Point Open version 2016.1. The GeoSure Insurance Product (including the Derived Postcode Database) represents the end of an interpretation process, starting with the BGS Digital Geological Map of Great Britain at the 1:50,000 scale (DiGMapGB-50). This digital map is the definitive record of the types of rocks underlying Great Britain (excluding the Isle of Man), as represented by various layers, starting with Bedrock and moving up to overlying Superficial layers. In 2003, the BGS also published a series of GIS digital maps identifying areas of potential natural ground movement hazard in Great Britain, called GeoSure. There are six separate hazards considered - shrink-swell clays, slope instability, dissolution of soluble ground, running sand, compressible and collapsible deposits. These maps were derived by combining the rock-type information from DiGMapGB-50 with a series of other influencing factors which may cause the geological hazards (e.g. steep slopes, groundwater). In 2005, the BGS used the GeoSure maps to make an interpretation of subsidence insurance risk for Great Britain property insurance industry, released as the new GeoSure Insurance Product. This represents the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings in a postcode database - the Derived Postcode Database, which can be accompanied by GIS maps showing the most significant hazard areas. The combined hazard is represented numerically in the Derived Postcode Database as the Total Hazard Score, with a breakdown into the component hazards. The GeoSure Derived Postcode Database (DPD) is a stand-alone database, which can be provided separately to the full GeoSure Insurance Product V7. The methodology behind the DPD involves balancing the 6 GeoSure natural ground stability hazards against each other. The GeoSure maps themselves have a fivefold coding (A to E), and the balancing exercise involves comparing each level across the six hazards e.g. comparing a level C shrink-swell clay area with a level C running sand area. The comparison is done by a process involving expert analysis and statistical interpretations to estimate the potential damage to a property (specifically low-rise buildings only). Each level of each of the hazards is given a 'hazard score' which can then be added together to derive a Total Hazard Score at a particular location (e.g. within a given postcode).

  • The data consists of annual values of soil respiration for plots subjected to climate change manipulations between 1999 and 2016. Data were collected from the climate change field site Climoor that is located in Clocaenog forest, Northeast Wales. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots (Plots 3, 6 and 9), three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours (Plots 1, 2 and 7) and three plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plant growing season (March to September, Plots 4, 5 and 8). Annual soil respiration values were calculated from fortnightly measurements of soil respiration. Soil respiration, milligrammes of Carbon dioxide - C per square metre per hour (mg CO2-C m-2 hr-1) was measured in the same pre-installed opaque soil collars. An infra-red gas analyser was used to measure the Carbon dioxide efflux. Annual soil respiration was calculated as sum of seasonal Carbon dioxide emissions. The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes. Plot level soil respiration measurements are important to investigate soil carbon dynamics and changes in soil carbon cycling and storage under the imposed climatic treatments. More detailed information about the field site, measurements and related datasets can be found in the supporting documentation. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/253aa0a7-1d5a-446c-a5ca-fe2f0f50f6b1