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2016

273 record(s)
 
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  • The following dataset provides climate and cave monitoring data from Cueva de Asiul northern Spain between 2010 and 2014. This data set was initially presented in Smith et al., (2016) Cave monitoring and the potential for palaeoclimate reconstruction from Cueva de Asiul, Cantabria (N. Spain). International Journal of Speleology, 45(1), 1-9. This data set represents the majority of cave monitoring undertaken at this site as part of a NERC funded PhD project (NERC studentship grant NE/I527953/1), data collection either occurred within this single cave site (43°19’0’’N, 3°35’28’’W) or within 1km of the cave in the village of Matienzo. The data set includes high resolution monitoring data for a range of climatic parameters including, cave and external temperature, rainfall direction, amount and oxygen isotope value, soil and cave air pCO2 concentration and carbon isotope value, cave drip rates and oxygen and deuterium isotope values. All data was collected using standard automated logging systems and the data/ samples were analysed either at Lancaster University, UK or at the NERC isotope geosciences laboratory, British Geological Survey, UK. Any missing data is a result of automated logger malfunction and is explained in full in the above cited paper. In combination this data offers a very high resolution, multiyear veiw into hydrological and cave ventilation processes, each of which play a major role in controlling speleothem growth and chemical makeup in Cueva de Asiul. The data set presents the pertinent background monitoring for the accurate interpretation of speleothems from this cave site. Those who may be interested in the data set include cave scientists who wish to implement a monitoring station/understand how climatic parameters influence speleothem development, or those who wish to obtain focused climate data from the Matienzo region between 2010 and 2014. The data set was collected by members of Lancaster University and the Matienzo caving expedition as part of NERC studentship grant NE/I527953/1. All cave monitoring was undertaken with kind permission from Gobierno de Cantabria, Cultura.

  • 3 datasets comprising of electron holograms acquired during in situ heating of a magnetite particle within a transmission electron microscope. Details of the experimental acquisition of the electron holograms can be found in the publications: Almeida, T. P., Muxworthy, A. R., Kovács, A., Williams, W., Brown, P. D., and Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. (2016) Direct visualization of the thermomagnetic behavior of pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles. Science Advances, 2(4), e1501801 & Almeida, T. P., Muxworthy, A. R., Kovács, A., Williams, W., Nagy, L., Ó Conbhuí, P., Frandsen, C., Supakulopas, R., Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. (2016): Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of a vortex structure held by a non-ideal magnetite recorder. Geophysical Research Letters, 42, DOI: 10.1002/2016GL070074.

  • The data set provides climate and cave monitoring data from Cueva de Asiul, Cantabria, northern Spain. This data was initially presented in graphical form in Smith et al., (2015) - Drip water Electrical Conductivity as an indicator of cave ventilation at the event scale. Science of the Total Environment, 532, 517-527. All data was collected from within the cave or within a 1km radius of the cave site (43°19'0"N, 3°35'28"W) using instrumentation set up as part of a PhD project running between January 2010 and January 2014. The data set includes high resolution event based monitoring data for a range of climatic parameters - cave and external temperature, rainfall amount, soil pCO2 cave air pCO2 concentration, cave drip water calcium saturation, drip water electrical conductivity and cave air pressure. This data was analysed at Lancaster University, UK or at the NERC isotope geosciences laboratory, British Geological Survey, UK. Any missing data from this 4 year period is a result of instrument malfunction and is clearly explained within the above cited paper. The electrical conductivity component of the data set offers the first data set of this type form any cave system, using a submerged CTD Diver probe and novel piston flow housing. The rest of the data constitute a part of a larger cave monitoring data set produced during the project using a number of standard automated cave monitoring devices. When combined this data leads us to conclude that cave drip water electrical conductivity is driven primarily by changes in cave air pCO2 at Cueva de Asiul and therefore responds to cave ventilation dynamics, rather than by changes in karst water residence time. Without such extremely high resolution monitoring the impact of cave ventilation on event based changes in drip water electrical conductivity would not have been established for this site. This data set should be of interest to anyone studying similar cave sites, interested in the role of electrical conductivity as a monitoring tool within caves and cave ventilation on speleothem growth dynamics. The data set was collected by members of Lancaster University and the Matienzo caving expedition as part of NERC studentship grant NE/I527953/1. All cave monitoring was undertaken with kind permission from Gobierno de Cantabria, Cultura.

  • This data set contains terrestrial fluxes of N2O from an intensively managed grazed grassland in Scotland measured using eddy covariance and chamber methods . The effect of a tillage event and two nitrogen fertilizer applications were investigated by comparing N2O fluxes from two adjacent intensively managed grazed grasslands , one of which was tilled. An eddy covariance system mounted at 2.4 m was used to measure fluxes of N2O, H2O and CO2 using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) gas analyser. Flux measurements were made over a six month period starting at the end of March, 2012. Chamber measurements were also made using both static and dynamic chambers. The data was collected as part of the GHG Platform project AC0116 funded by DEFRA. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7f54018c-3071-4213-8cee-78f8bd57977d

  • The dataset comprises the field soil organic matter content as a percentage at three depth zones (roughly 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm), measured from bulk density soil samples taken within each 1metre x 1metre quadrat. Prior to measurement of bulk density all soil samples were dried at 105°C for 72 hours. A sub-sample was then taken and dried at 375°C for 16 hours to determine the percentage organic matter of dry soil. Sampling was conducted at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 metre (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 metres, 10-100 metres and 100-1000 metres. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England. The Morecambe Bay samples were taken during the winter and summer of 2013. The Essex samples were taken during the winter, early spring and summer of 2013. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/90457ba1-f291-4158-82dc-425d7cbb1ac5

  • This data set describes the prevalence of trypanosomes and Sodalis glossinidius, and host blood meal analysis from tsetse flies (Glossina morsitans morsitans) captured during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. The Luangwa Valley in Zambia is an old focus of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) and sporadic outbreaks have continued to occur in the human population. In recent years there has been an influx of people migrating from the densely populated plateau region resulting in a significant change in land-use in the study area, potentially influencing tsetse dynamics and the epidemiology of HAT. This data set was collected to monitor infection rates of trypanosomes and Sodalis glossinidius in Glossina morsitans morsitans tsetse flies in the area so as to assess the risk posed to both human and livestock populations. In addition, feeding patterns of tsetse were investigated through analysis of blood meals. This work was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and contributed to the Zambia trypanosomiasis case study. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a55eea77-8401-49ba-921e-53e085dc8345

  • Reports, images, GIS and gridded products describing the Palaeozoic geology and conventional petroleum systems of parts of the UK offshore from the greater Irish Sea area. Carboniferous rocks were the focus in areas from the Firth of Clyde, Solway Basin, Manx-Peel Basin to the East Irish Sea Basin and surrounding areas (Quadrants 110-126). The peer-reviewed products were produced for the 21CXRM Palaeozoic Project by BGS for DECC/OGA, Oil and Gas UK and oil company sponsors between November 2014 and May 2016, to improve regional digital datasets and knowledge of the underexplored Palaeozoic petroleum systems, and to stimulate exploration. The petroleum systems analysis was based on new interpretations of well, seismic, gravity-magnetic and source rock datasets, integrated with petrophysical studies, basin modelling and UK onshore knowledge. Released data were collated and interpreted, and interpretations of unreleased data were included with agreement of the data owners. Unreleased raw data is excluded. The datasets are applicable for use at scales between 1: 750,000 to 1: 3,000,000.

  • The data set contains fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) from Whim peatbog in central Scotland, measured using chamber methods. A nitrogen deposition experiment was carried out at the site, where nitrogen was applied in different forms (ammonium, nitrate, and ammonia) at doses from zero to ~100 kg N per ha per year. Flux measurements were made over a six month period starting at the end of March, 2012. The experiment was begun in 2002 under the NERC Global Nitrogen Enrichment (GaNE) programme, and continued under various funding sources. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7c1dd26a-5df5-4b90-854b-70d0d97eb78a

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset provides the details of all sites which have been monitored as part of the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Data includes the location within the UK, the length and width of the line transect on each site, and how long the transect has been monitored. The UKBMS started in 1976 with fewer than 50 sites. The number of sites monitored each year has increased to over a thousand since 2008. There is turnover in sites monitored each year and details of the first and last year in which each site was surveyed are given. The majority of site data is provided by recorders at the time a transect is created. The majority of these recorders are volunteers. The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) collate the data and the UKBMS is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/814c6d77-1a16-4e94-bcf2-73823e3240fd

  • This dataset consists of monthly spatial patterns of meteorological change for 22 Global Circulation Models (GCMs). The patterns are a set of regression coefficients, each representing the change per degree of mean global warming over land, for the corresponding meteorological variable. The meteorological variables analysed for each GCM include: surface temperature change per degree global warming (K/K); surface relative humidity change per degree global warming (%/K); wind change per degree global warming (m/s/K); longwave change per degree global warming (W/m2/K); shortwave change per degree global warming (W/m2/K); precipitation change per degree global warming (mm/day/K) and pressure change per degree global warming (hPa/K). The 22 GCMs emulated are: BCCR-BCM2.0, CGCM3.1(T47), CNRM-CM3, CSIRO-Mk3.0, CSIRO-Mk3.5, GFDL-CM2.0, GFDL-CM2.1, GISS-EH, GISS-ER, FGOALS-g1.0, INGV-SXG, INM-CM3.0, IPSL-CM4, MIROC3.2(hires), MIROC3.2(medres), ECHO-G, ECHAM5/MPI-OM, MRI-CGCM2.3.2, CCSM3, PCM, UKMO-HadCM3, UKMO-HadGEM1. The supporting information document associated with this metadata includes parameters for an energy balance model (IMOGEN EBM) that calculates the amount of global warming. Each GCM output has been re-mapped on to UKMO-HadCM3 grid, with resolution of 3.75 deg longitude and 2.5 deg latitude; this produces a surface spatial resolution of about 417 km E-W x 278 km N-S, reducing to 295 km E-W x 278 km N-S at 45 degrees North and South. This corresponds to 1631 land points, each of which has a row in the provided data files. The data presented here is calibration of IMOGEN EBM parameters and patterns against 22 GCMs in the CMIP3 GCM ensemble. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4e8f3459-4101-4c85-a598-80b3c739f580