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2017

1558 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 1558
  • WCRP CMIP5: The CNRM-CERFACS team CNRM-CM5 model output for the 10-year hindcast/prediction initialized in year 1985 (decadal1985) experiment. These data cover the following realms: atmos, land, landIce, ocean and seaIce; at the following frequencies: day, fx and mon. The runs included the ensemble members: r0i0p0, r10i1p1, r1i1p1, r2i1p1, r3i1p1, r4i1p1, r5i1p1, r6i1p1, r7i1p1, r8i1p1 and r9i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5). The CNRM-CERFACS team consisted of the following agencies: Centre National de Recherches Meteorologiques (CNRM) and Centre Europeen de Recherche et Formation Avancees en Calcul Scientifique (CERFACS).

  • Global Coordination of Atmospheric Electricity Measurements (GloCAEM) project brought these experts together to make the first steps towards an effective global network for FW atmospheric electricity monitoring by holding workshops to discuss measurement practises and instrumentation, as well as establish recording and archiving procedures to archive electric field data in a standardised, easily accessible format, then by creating a central data repository. This project was funded in the UK under NERC grant NE/N013689/1. This dataset contains measurements of atmospheric electricity and electric potential gradient made using a Cambell Scientific CS110 electric-field mill at Graciosa Azores.

  • WCRP CMIP5: Met Office Hadley Centre (MOHC) HadGEM2-ES model output for the ESM feedback 1 (esmFdbk1) experiment. These data cover the following realms: aerosol, atmos, land, landIce, ocean, ocnBgchem and seaIce; at the following frequencies: day, fx, mon and yr. The runs included the ensemble members: r0i0p0 and r1i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5).

  • This dataset encompasses thin section photographs, mineral composition data and Ar/Ar data. Grant abstract: Many of the Earth's great mountain ranges, such as the Alps and the Himalaya, result from the collision between two continents. As mountains get pushed up by tectonic forces, they also get worn away by surface erosion. The uplift of topography causes long-term regional and global climate change, and conversely, changes in climate have also been linked to changes in the rate of tectonic processes. This project will define and quantify the competition between growth and erosion during the early stages of mountain uplift by exploiting a combination of state-of the art advances in numerical modelling and analytical techniques. During the early stages of continental collision, unusual (and diagnostic) rock types form under very high pressure conditions. Certain minerals in these rocks preserve details of the pressures and temperatures experienced during the journey from initial formation deep in the mantle, through their subsequent transport to the Earth's surface, their erosion, and their final deposition as sand grains in a sedimentary rock. The minerals retain distinctive chemical signatures which allows them to be distinguished from those formed in other rock types, even when eroded and turned into sand. Sand grains retain information about not only the original rock type, but also about details of the formation and transport history of the original rock. Unlocking this information will therefore yield insight into earlier stages of mountain belt growth history than is currently preserved in the bedrock record. However the methods needed to decipher these details are currently insufficiently precise to provide useful insight into changes in rates of tectonic or erosive processes, or constraints for the models. This project will therefore also develop and exploit innovative techniques for obtaining high-precision data from these high pressure rocks and their eroded remains. These data will enable the competing forces which act to shape a mountain belt during the early stages of formation to be quantified and allow the numerical models to be robustly tested. The unique contribution of this proposal lies in the combination of geodynamic numerical modelling with studies based on observational data and hence exploiting the synergy between these two, normally disparate, fields.

  • Global warming during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma) is commonly interpreted as being driven by massive destabilization of carbon from surficial sedimentary reservoirs. If correct, this has important implications for the amplification of future fossil fuel emissions via carbon-climate feedbacks. In our study we provided new paired records of boron and carbon isotope changes in the ocean that questions this long-held interpretation. Our data are implemented in an Earth system model to reconstruct the unfolding carbon cycle dynamics across the event. Strong evidence for a larger (>10,000 PgC) and on average isotopically heavier (> -17‰) carbon source leads us to identify volcanism associated with the North Atlantic Igneous Province as the main driver of the PETM. We also find that although organic carbon feedbacks with climate played a more minor role in driving the event than previously thought, organic matter burial was important in ultimately sequestering this carbon and driving the recovery of the system. Data presented in this data set comprise geochemical elemental, as well as boron, carbon and oxygen isotopic data from surface dwelling foraminifera Morozovella Subbotina. Alongside the boron isotopic data we also provide reconstructed surface water pH with corresponding uncertainties for our preferred pH reconstruction.

  • A worldwide compilation of 333 analyses of U and Pb concentrations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from island arc magmas. These data were used in Delavault et al. (2016, Geology 44, 819-822) to calculate the present-day distribution of the U/Pb ratios in magmas generated in subduction setting.

  • Microstructural data for rocks in the Shiant Isles Main Sill, presented as a function of stratigraphic height in the sill. The data were published: Holness et al. (2017) Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 172:7. OI 10.1007/s00410-016-1325-x

  • WCRP CMIP5: College of Global Change and Earth System Science (GCESS) BNU-ESM model output for the ESM historical (esmHistorical) experiment. These data cover the following realms: aerosol, atmos, land, landIce, ocean, ocnBgchem and seaIce; at the following frequencies: day, mon and yr. The runs included the ensemble member: r1i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5).

  • FeS polymorphs are of significant relevance to condensed matter physics and planetary science. In particular, they are thought to form the cores of Earth and Mars, which is suggested by their presence in many meteorites. Data are plain text files containing the relative volume expansion, molar heat capacity and molar entropy of the FeS phases at different pressures as a function of temperature. Research results based upon these data are published at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpcs.2017.07.033

  • In this project we developed a new geobarometer for mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks, which can be used by the scientific community for a wide range of mineralogical and petrological studies. The material here include the description of the geobarometer, guidelines for its use, software and chemical data acquired for some case studies.