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2019

1110 record(s)
 
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  • The 5km Hex GS Collapsible Deposits dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Collapsible Deposits v8 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements.

  • The 5km Hex GS Shrink Swell dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Shrink Swell v8 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Shrink Swell methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to shrink and swell. Many soils contain clay minerals that absorb water when wet (making them swell), and lose water as they dry (making them shrink). This shrink-swell behaviour is controlled by the type and amount of clay in the soil, and by seasonal changes in the soil moisture content (related to rainfall and local drainage). The rock formations most susceptible to shrink-swell behaviour are found mainly in the south-east of Britain. Clay rocks elsewhere in the country are older and have been hardened by burial deep in the earth and are less able to absorb water. The BGS has carried out detailed geotechnical and mineralogical investigations into rock types known to shrink, and are modelling their properties across the near surface. This research underpins guidance contained in the national GeoSure dataset, and is the basis for our responses to local authorities, companies and members of the public who require specific information on the hazard in their areas. The BGS is undertaking a wide-ranging research programme to investigate this phenomenon by identifying those areas most at risk and developing sustainable management solutions. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

  • In 1998 the Department for International Development (DFID) funded the project ‘Groundwater drought early warning for vulnerable areas’ as part of the DFID Knowledge and Research (KaR) programme, a collaboration between UK partners BGS and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), and with the Bureau of Water, Mines and Energy in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Drawing on village surveys and stakeholder consultations across sectors, this project evolved a broader, more holistic approach to the study of drought and water supply. Rather than focus exclusively on drought and water availability, constraints on household access to and use of water were explored through the lens of water security. This, in turn, highlighted links between the household water economy (across seasons; between good and bad years) and wider livelihood strategies, particularly in relation to inter-dependencies between food and water security.

  • Stable isotope and inorganic chemistry data for samples of groundwater from boreholes and springs in the sandur aquifer; glacial meltwater and river water; and glacier ice, from Virkisjokull glacier observatory. Selected water chemistry and stable isotope data are reported in Ó Dochartaigh, B. É., et al. 2019. Groundwater?- glacier?meltwater interaction in proglacial aquifers, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2019-120

  • This data set contains daily position solutions for GPS stations deployed on Corbetti and Aluto volcano, Ethiopia. The results for Aluto were originally published in "Seasonal patterns of seismicity and deformation at the Alutu geothermal reservoir, Ethiopia, induced by hydrological loading", Birhanu et. al. (2018). Corbetti results were partially published in "Sustained Uplift at a Continental Rift Caldera", Lloyd et al. (2018).

  • Porewaters from IODP Expedition 366 were extracted from serpentinite mud volcano sediments onboard the RV JOIDES Resolution (see Fryer et al, 2017; 2018 for details). Selected samples were then analysed at the University of Southampton for 87Sr/86Sr and boron isotopes and SUERC for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope data. The strontium isotope data has recently been accepted for publication (Albers et al., 2019 (In Press) Fluid–rock interactions in the shallow Mariana forearc: carbon cycling and redox conditions, Solid Earth special issue "Exploring new frontiers in fluids processes in subduction zones").

  • Ascii files and tables with earthquake source and model parameters for five events in the Azores archipelago.

  • The database contains field measurements and field descriptions of pseudotachylytes and mylonites that formed at lower crustal conditions and that are now exposed on the Nusfjord ridge, Lofoten, northern Norway. The field measurements were used to derive earthquake source parameters associated with the generation of the Nusfjord pseudotachylytes.

  • Data files have .dat extension and can be opened with Notepad or any basic text editor software. Each file contains details of sample name, dimensions (length and diameter). All deformed samples were pre-prepared cylinders of synthetic neighbourite. Each file contains 11 data column as follows: Time (hours); Time (secs); CP (V); Vol (V); Force(V); Temp (V); Disp(V); Euro disp (mm); Furn T (mV); PoreP (mV); Furnace Power where V= Volts, mV= millivolts. The Calibration sheet (specific to the apparatus used) uploaded together with the data files is required to convert V and mV raw data into values of stress, strain, strain rate, confining pressure and temperature.

  • Excel file containing abundance data of planktonic foraminifer from IODP Expedition 375 Hole 1520C (41R-44R)