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2020

739 record(s)
 
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  • High frequency (100 Hz) data from two horizontal induction coils measuring the Earth's magnetic field at the Eskdalemuir Observatory in the United Kingdom. The data covers the period from January 2019 to December 2019. Also included are examples of Matlab code and the frequency calibration files to convert to the raw data to SI units. Thumbnail spectrograms and metadata are also supplied.

  • These data comprise four phases of geophysical survey carried out in 2002, 2007, 2008 and 2011, covering various areas within the Thames Estuary as part of an overarching archaeological investigation called the London Gateway project (2001-2020) ahead of planned dredging works. 88635_49575_2002 - Area of sidescan sonar data within the Thames Estuary (shell haven) area. The data were acquired in OSGB36 British National Grid coordinates and covers the area: Top Left - 570395.312500 E, 183444.953125 N, Top Right - 604097.250000 E, 183444.953125 N, Bottom Right - 604097.250000 E, 177590.140625 N, Bottom Left - 570395.312500 E, 177590.140625 N. 88635_61207_2007 - Geophysical survey comprising sidescan sonar data acquired over 13 separate wreck sites. Corresponding MBES data were acquired previously in 2005 and are deposited with the UKHO. SSS data comprise a total of 83 .xtf files with 2 channels. Acquired in WGS84 UTMz31N coordinates. 400 KhZ frequency. Range 50 m. Sensor positions rather than ship positions for each line in metadata. Each wreck location is centred on (UTMz31N): Amethyst - 364468 E, 5708659 N; Ancient - 325490 E, 5708230 N; Argus - 359499 E, 5706071 N; Ash - 360905 E, 5706497 N; Atherton - 359708 E, 5706186 N; Dynamo - 401449 E, 5743755 N; EastOaze - 362786 E, 5707385 N; ErnaBoldt - 403551 E, 5746997 N; Letchworth - 357544 E, 5705592 N; London - 343115 E, 5707365 N; Pottery - 346619 E, 5706276 N; SS Storm - 406001 E, 5747115 N; Unknown wreck - 375530 E, 5714052 N. 88635_61208_2008 - Geophysical survey comprising sidescan sonar and multibeam echosounder data over a single wreck site. SSS data comprise a total of 7 .xtf files with 2 channels. 400 KhZ frequency. Range 50 m. Acquired in WGS84 Geographic coordinates. Sensor positions rather than ship positions for each line in metadata. Wreck location in WGS84 UTMz31N: Aisha - 363982 E, 5707656 N. 88635_79800_2011 - Geophysical survey comprising magnetometer, sidescan sonar and multibeam echosounder data undertaken over three separate blocks; Area 9to11, Area 26to36 and Area 105. Area9to11:332980 E, 5708675 N; 332980 E, 5708226 N; 338586 E, 5707813 N; 338681 E, 5708242 N. Area26to36:339693 E, 5708096 N; 339571 E, 5707680 N; 345670 E, 5706229 N; 350490 E, 5706371 N; 350338 E, 5706838 N; 345680 E, 5706685 N. Area105:383734 E, 5719704 N; 384035 E, 5719369 N; 385920 E, 5720804 N; 385619 E, 5721134 N. Where corresponding multibeam echosounder data were acquired, these data have been archived with the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO). Overarching full archaeological investigation, including results of the assessment of these data, and technical reports are archived with the Archaeology Data Service (ADS) (https://doi.org/10.5284/1083494).

  • The dataset comprises: Petrophysical data for rocks from the region, XRD mineralogical data, Results of the gravity survey of the basin, tabulation and location of all bedding orientation data for the basin, and sediment transport lineation data. The dataset accompanies publication : On the Structure and Evolution of the Sorbas Basin, S.E. Spain, Tectonophysics 773 (2019) 228230, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tecto.2019.228230

  • Late (0-250 ka) and middle (1050-1280 ka) Pleistocene boron isotope data from planktic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) and oxygen isotopes data from benthic formainifera (Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi). Boron isotopes measured using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (MC-ICPMS).

  • These data files represent simulations of hydrated cation vacancies in the mantle mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) undertaken using the CASTEP atomic scale simulation code (http://www.castep.org/). Results from these simulations allow the structure relative stability of different defect configurations to be compared. Three types of cation vacancies are considered (M1, M2 and Si) each decorated by hydrogen in order to charge balance the system. For M1 and M2 this results in multiple configurations (with hydrogen bonded to different oxygen atoms around the vacant site). For Si there is only one configuration as all four oxygen atoms are bonded to hydrogen for the charge neutral defect. For each configuration input files detail the initial atomic structure of the defect along with simulation parameters. Output files record the progress of the simulation, the final atomic structure, the energy of this structure, and various predicted properties of the structure. Only ASCII output data is included as binary data created by CASTEP is not intended to be portable, and can easily be recreated using the ASCII files.

  • Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the Abbey St. Bathans remote site (ASBR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the Abbey St. Bathans underline site (ASBU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert et al (2020) for further details.

  • This collection comprises two time-series of 3D in-situ synchrotron x-ray microtomography (μCT) volumes showing two Ailsa Craig micro-granite samples (ACfresh02 and ACHT01) undergoing triaxial deformation. These data were collected in-situ at the PSICHE beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron, Gif-sur-Yvette, France in December 2016 (standard proposal 20160434) and are fully explained in Cartwright-Taylor A., Main, I.G., Butler, I.B., Fusseis, F., Flynn M. and King, A. (in press), Catastrophic failure: how and when? Insights from 4D in-situ x-ray micro-tomography, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth. Together, these two time-series show the influence of heterogeneity on the micro-crack network evolution. Ailsa Craig micro-granite is known for being virtually crack-free. One sample (ACfresh02) remained as-received from the quarry until it was deformed, while the second (ACHT01) was slowly heated to 600 degC and then slowly cooled prior to deformation in order to introduce material disorder in the form of a network of nano-scale thermal cracks. Thus these two samples represent two extreme end-members: (i) ACfresh02 with the lowest possible (to our knowledge) natural pre-existing crack density, and so is a relatively homogeneous sample and (ii) ACHT01 with a thermally-induced nano-crack network imprinted over the nominally crack-free microstructure, and therefore has increased heterogeneity relative to ACfresh02. Each 3D μCT volume shows the sub-region of each sample in which the majority of damage was located and has three parts. Part one is reconstructed 16-bit greyscale data. Part two is 8-bit binary data showing individual voids (pores and micro-cracks) in the dataset after segmentation. Part three is 32-bit data showing the local thickness of each void, as in Cartwright-Taylor et al. (in press) Figures 4 and 5. Each part is a zip file containing a sequence of 2D image files (.tif), sequentially numbered according to the depth (in pixels, parallel to the loading axis) at which it lies within the sample volume. File dimensions are in pixels (2D), with an edge length of 2.7 microns. Each zip file is labelled with the sample name, the relevant letter for each 3D volume as given in Cartwright-Taylor et al. (in press) Tables 3 and 4, part 1, 2 or 3 (depending whether the data are greyscale, binary or local thickness respectively), the differential stress (MPa) on the sample, and the associated ram pressure (bar) to link with individual file names. The following convention is used: sample_letter_part_differentialstress_rampressure_datatype. Also included are (i) two spreadsheets (.xlsx), one for each sample, containing processing parameters and the mechanical stress and strain at which each volume was scanned, and (ii) zip files containing .csv files containing measurement data for the labelled voids in each volume. N.B. void label numbers are not consistent between volumes so they can only be used to obtain global statistics, not to track individual voids.

  • Locations of samples collected to constrain the recent activity on normal faults across Nevada. The geological samples will be used to measure the amount of exhumation that different normal faults of the Basin and Range experienced over the last 5 million years. The samples have been collected from granitic rocks that are expected to yield apatite crystals. (Uranium-Thorium)/Helium thermochronometry will be conducted on these samples to determine the cooling history of rocks from temperatures of approximately 70 degrees celsius. The samples are collected across Nevada at locations close to the fault to determine the most recent stages of exhumation. The ranges sampled are the Wassuk Range, White Range, Toiyabe Range, South Egan Range, Schell Range, Wheeler Range, House Range, Wasatch, Deep Greek, Ruby Range, Cortez Range, Humbolt Range, Dixie Valley, and Carson Range. Samples weigh approximately 2kg each. This sample coverage will constrain extension rates across the Basin and Range which is of interest to geologists, geodynamicists, and researchers interested in fault hazard.

  • Magnetotelluric (MT) time series including the September 2017 magnetic storm at 7 sites in the Scottish Highlands collected by Fiona Simpson (University of Southampton) and Karsten Bahr (University of Göttingen) using Göttingen RAP dataloggers, Magson fluxgate magnetometers and Filloux-type electrodes. Data acquisition methodology is described in F. Simpson and K. Bahr, 2005. Practical Magnetotellurics, Cambridge University Press, London pp. 254, 2005, ISBN: 9781108462556, DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511614095 This dataset is described in: F. Simpson and K. Bahr, 2020a. Nowcasting and validating Earth’s electric field response to extreme space weather events using magnetotelluric data: application to the September 2017 geomagnetic storm and comparison to observed and modelled fields in Scotland, Space Weather, accepted, doi pending. F. Simpson and K. Bahr, 2020b. Estimating the electric field response to the Halloween 2003 and September 2017 magnetic storms across Scotland using observed geomagnetic fields, magnetotelluric impedances and perturbation tensors, Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate, accepted, doi pending.

  • The borehole information pack from borehole GGB05, site 05 of the UK Geoenergy Observatories (UKGEOS) Glasgow facility. This release from the British Geological Survey (BGS) contains BGS and Drillers’ logs, a listing of archived rock chips and a descriptive report. The environmental baseline characterisation and monitoring borehole was drilled between 5th July and 11th October 2019 (start of drilling to casing installation date) to 46 m drilled depth. The cased borehole was hydrogeologically tested in Febuary 2020. Rock chip samples were taken during the drilling process and have been archived at the National Geological Repository at BGS Keyworth. Further details can be found in the accompanying report http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/528084 DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.5285/e0ec7462-b731-47c6-93d6-e4613fb44be0