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  • The Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset forms part of the BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product. This product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland; Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland; and Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland. Aquifer productivity is a measure of the potential of aquifers to sustain a borehole water supply. The Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset version 2 (2015) indicates the location and productivity of bedrock aquifers across Scotland, and their groundwater flow characteristics. Developed as a tool to support groundwater resource management, the dataset provides a guide to aquifer characteristics at a regional scale, and may be useful to anyone interested in learning more about, assessing or managing groundwater resources across Scotland. The dataset is delivered at 1: 100 000 scale; the resolution of the dataset being 50 m and the smallest detectable feature 100 m.

  • The National Soil Parent Material dataset is a GIS describing the geological material from which topsoils and subsoils (A and B horizons) develop (i.e. from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core geological characteristics relating to their lithologies. The dataset covers England, Scotland and Wales and characterises parent material lithology, texture, mineralogy, strength and a range of other soil/parent related properties.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of available Hydrogeological Maps which have been published at various scales, covering areas ranging in size from the whole of England and Wales, Northern Ireland and to Jersey. They display information on surface water features, the three dimensional geometry of aquifers, groundwater levels, abstractions and quality including saline intrusion in varying amounts of detail.

  • This mineral resource data was produced as part of the Mineral Resource Map of Northern Ireland via a commission from the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment. The work resulted in a series of 21 data layers which were used to generate a series of six digitally generated maps. This work was completed in 2012 with one map for each of the six counties (including county boroughs) of Northern Ireland at a scale of 1:100 000. This data and the accompanying maps are intended to assist strategic decision making in respect of mineral extraction and the protection of important mineral resources against sterilisation. They bring together a wide range of information, much of which is scattered and not always available in a convenient form. The data has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland and was funded via a commission from the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment. These layers display the spatial data of the mineral resources of Northern Ireland. There are a series of layers which consist of: Bedrock: Clay, Coal & Lignite, Coal – lignite proven, Conglomerate, Dolomite, Igneous and meta-igneous rock, Limestone, a 100m buffer layer on the Ulster White Limestone, Meta-sedimentary rocks, Perlite, Salt, sandstone and Silica Sand. Superficial (unconsolidated recent sediments) : Sand & gravel and Peat. The data except for the salt and proven lignite resource layers was derived from the 1:50 00 and 1:250 000 scale DigMap NI dataset. A user guide 'The Mineral Resources of Northern Ireland digital dataset (version 1)' OR/12/039 describing the creation and use of the data is available. A companion set of data with the internal boundaries retained is also available.

  • The dataset describes the relative vulnerability of groundwater to contamination across Scotland, by means of five relative classes ranging from 1 (lowest vulnerability) to 5 (highest vulnerability). The dataset is a screening tool that can be used to show the relative threat to groundwater quality from contamination across Scotland. It can provide guidance on the vulnerability of groundwater at a regional scale, highlighting areas at comparatively higher risk of groundwater contamination, and can help indicate the degree of specific site investigation required for a new development or activity. It is designed to be used at a scale of 1:100,000 and should be regarded as a tool to aid groundwater risk assessment rather than a complete solution. Latest version: Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland version 2

  • The dataset describes the potential of superficial deposit aquifers across Scotland to sustain various levels of borehole water supply, based on four productivity classes: high; moderate to high; moderate; and a category to signify that a deposit is 'not a significant aquifer'. All superficial deposits aquifers in Scotland are assumed to have primarily intergranular groundwater flow. The dataset is a tool to indicate the location and productivity of superficial deposit aquifers across Scotland. It may have several uses, including in policy analysis and development; to prioritise aquifer and site investigations; to inform planning decisions; and to improve awareness of groundwater in general. The complexity and heterogeneity of geological formations means that the dataset is only a guide. It is designed to be used at a scale of 1:100,000, and not to assess aquifer conditions at a single point. Latest version : Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland version 2

  • This dataset for the UK, Jersey and Guernsey contains the Corine Land Cover (CLC) changes between 2006 and 2012. This shapefile has been created by combining the land cover change layers from the individual CLC database files for the UK, Jersey and Guernsey. CLC is a dataset produced within the frame of the Initial Operations of the Copernicus programme (the European Earth monitoring programme previously known as GMES) on land monitoring. CLC provides consistent information on land cover and land cover changes across Europe. This inventory was initiated in 1985 (initial reference year 1990) and then established a time series of land cover information with updates in 2000 and 2006 with the last one being for the 2012 reference year. CLC products are based on the analysis of satellite images by national teams of participating countries - the EEA member and cooperating countries - following a standard methodology and nomenclature with the following base parameters: - 44 classes in the hierarchical three level Corine nomenclature - Minimum mapping unit (MMU) for Land Cover Changes (LCC) for the change layers is 5 hectares. The resulting national land cover inventories are further integrated into a seamless land cover map of Europe. Land cover and land use (LCLU) information is important not only for land change research, but also more broadly for the monitoring of environmental change, policy support, the creation of environmental indicators and reporting. CLC datasets provide important information supporting the implementation of key priority areas of the Environment Action Programmes of the European Union as protecting ecosystems, halting the loss of biological diversity, tracking the impacts of climate change, assessing developments in agriculture and implementing the EU Water Framework Directive, among others. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/35fecd0f-b466-448b-94d1-0bba90be450e

  • The map shows the localities of significant fossil samples, either collected by BGS Staff, or donated by individuals and institutions. The BGS fossil collections contain over 2 million specimens, including a sizeable quantity of type, figured and cited material. Since a small number of fossil locations are confidential, you are unable to view this dataset at large scales. However, if you send a data enquiry, such information may be made available. Enquiries are normally free, but a charge may be levied depending upon the time taken; users will be notified in advance. Material is available for inspection on application by e-mail. Specimens are sometimes available for loan to bona fide academics.

  • The map shows the localities of significant fossil samples, either collected by BGS Staff, or donated by individuals and institutions. The BGS fossil collections contain over 2 million specimens, including a sizeable quantity of type, figured and cited material. Since a small number of fossil locations are confidential, you are unable to view this dataset at large scales. However, if you send a data enquiry, such information may be made available. Enquiries are normally free, but a charge may be levied depending upon the time taken; users will be notified in advance. Material is available for inspection on application by e-mail. Specimens are sometimes available for loan to bona fide academics.

  • This layer of the GeoIndex shows the localities for which details of identified fossil specimens in the BGS Biostratigraphy Museum are databased. Only Ordovician and Silurian specimens listed currently. Samples and taxonomic identifications will be listed and will in future be able to be queried using the query-by-attribute tool to the right of the map. See also Fossil Localities. Material is available for inspection on application by e-mail; it is free for academic research but is charged for commercial work. Specimens are sometimes available for loan to bona fide academics.