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  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Linear features (shown as polylines) represent six classes of geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Limited coverage within Great Britain, data exists for 167 10x10km tiles. Most primary geological mapping was carried out at 1:10 000 scale but in some areas of Wales and Scotland mapping at 1:25 000 was adopted as the norm including areas with complex geology or in some areas of classic geology. Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. However landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. The linear features are organised into seven main categories: Alteration area, indicating a zone of change to the pre-existing rocks due to the application of heat and pressure that can occur round structural features such as faults and dykes. Fault, where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by a large scale process affecting the earth's crust. Fold, where strata are bent or deformed resulting from changes or movement of the earth's surface creating heat and pressure to reshape and transform the original horizontal strata. Folds appear on all scales, in all rock types and from a variety of causes. Fossil horizons, where prolific fossil assemblages occur and can be used to help establish the order in which deposits were laid down (stratigraphy). These horizons allow correlation where sediments of the same age look completely different due to variations in depositional environment. Landforms, define the landscape by its surface form; these include glacial features such as drumlins, eskers and ice margins. Mineral vein, where concentrations of crystallised mineral occur within a rock, they are closely associated with faulting but may occur independently. Rock, identifies key (marker) beds, recognised as showing distinct physical characteristics or fossil content. Examples include coal seams, gypsum beds and marine bands. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence. Another batch of tiles was added to the data in 2012 to bring the total to 167 for this version 2 release.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale providing bedrock geology. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock geology of Great Britain is very diverse and includes three broad classes based on their mode of origin: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. The data includes attribution to identify each rock type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volumes 1-3). The bedrock has formed over long periods of geological time, from the Archean eon some 7500 million years ago, to relatively young Pliocene, 58 million years ago. The age of the rocks is identified in the data through their BGS lexicon name (published for each deposit at the time of the original survey or subsequent digital data creation). For stratified rocks i.e. arranged in sequence, this will usually be of a lithostratigraphic type. Other rock types for example intrusive igneous bodies will be of a lithodemic type. More information on the formal naming of UK rocks is available in the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units. The bedrock theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons). The data are attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence. Another batch of tiles was added to the data in 2012 to bring the total to 167 for this version 2 release.

  • The Bedrock summary lithologies dataset is digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200m, which groups the bedrock lithologies (rock types) into classes based on similar engineering geology characteristics. The map is derived from the 1:250,000 scale digital bedrock map of the UKCS, called DiGRock250k, which is available separately from the BGS. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The divisions on the map combine the bedrock formations into 8 classes (with several subdivisions) of similar strength and lithological variability, each with a ‘Category’ title that summarises their main lithological character: Class1 – Igneous; Class 2 - Tertiary Sandstone and Limestone; Class 2.5 - Tertiary Sandstone and Limestone Interbedded; Class 3 - Tertiary Mudstone; Class 4 - Mesozoic Sandstone and Limestone; Class 4.5 - Mesozoic Sandstone and Limestone Interbedded; Class 5 - Mesozoic Mudstone; Class 6 – Chalk; Class 7 – Metamorphic; Class 8 - Palaeozoic Sedimentary. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of mass movement e.g. landslip. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the locations of over 12,500 rock samples from the land area of the United Kingdom gathered as part of the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP). The Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP), funded by the DTI, carried out baseline mineral exploration in Great Britain between 1972 and 1997. The programme has been subsumed into the new BGS Minerals Programme, also funded by the DTI. The rock samples have been analysed for a variety of major and trace elements, mainly by XRF.

  • The data consist of the results of geotechnical testing carried out at various depth intervals on shallow cores or boreholes collected BGS from the UK Continental Shelf. The bulk of the data north of 56N are in digital form and result from testing carried out on board survey vessels using hand-held test equipment (penetrometers and shear vanes). These values are averaged for each test interval, and are expressed in kiloPascals. There are approximately 6000 test results in the data set. Some more detailed test information, in non-digital and report form is held for selected sites. Also for most sites where digital data is not available, geological descriptions of core material will also contains semi-quantitative information on the stiffness of the material. Geotechnical knowledge is required to understand and interpret the results if they are to be used as a basis for engineering studies. Core material are managed as part of the BGS Materials collection and are available for examination, testing or subsampling. The data are stored as part of the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. Data are delivered via BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm geotechnical layers. Reference: Fannin, NGT. (1989) Offshore Investigations 1966-87. British Geological Survey Technical Report WB/89/2, British Geological Survey.

  • Two geochemical surveys were undertaken in the Solomon Islands between 1976 and 1983 as part of a combined geological mapping and mineral exploration project. The survey of Choiseul and the Shortland Islands was carried out between 1976 and 1979 by the Institute of Geological Sciences (now the British Geological Survey) with support from staff of the Geology Division of the Ministry of Land, Energy and Natural Resources, Solomon Islands. The project produced 12 geological maps at 1:50,000 scale as well as a series of unpublished reports. The survey of the New Georgia Group of islands was undertaken between 1979 and 1983. The project produced 7 geological maps at a scale of 1:100,000 and a regional map of the entire island group at a scale of 1:250,000. A series of multielement geochemical anomaly maps were produced at a scale of 1:100,000 to accompany each of the published geological maps. Master copies of these are held at the Geological Survey in Honiara. Full descriptions of the methods used are described in the margins of the anomaly maps. A total of 8848 stream sediment samples were collected from Choiseul and 7441 from the New Georgia Group, resulting in an average sampling density for the two areas of 2.68 samples per km2 and 1.47 samples per km2 respectively. Sampling in the Shortland Islands was confined to the larger islands, 187 were collected from the Fauro Island group, 148 from Alu and 69 from Mono. The samples were dry sieved and the fraction passing -80 mesh B.S. (177 microns) was analysed. A hot concentrated nitric acid digestion was used prior to analysis by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry (AAS) for Co, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Mn. Samples from the vicinity of the Siruka Ultramafic Complex were determined for Cr by AAS after digestion by a bisulphate fusion technique. Raw data can be obtained from the Geology Division, Ministry of Mines and Energy, PO Box G37, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

  • Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) representing geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised set of linear features. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, and the Isle of Man. Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The digital data are attributed by fault type; two categories of fault are described in the data: contact and non-contact faults. Contact faults form a boundary between two different rock types whilst non-contact faults indicate a fault displacement within the same rock. The data has been generalised and shows only the location of major faults. All faults shown are inferred i.e. not exposed or seen at a locality, but derived from other evidence including linear depressions in the landscape, the truncation or displacement of topographical features. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows sites where regularly monitored rest water level data are available, usually covering a long time period. The data shows seasonal fluctuations in the water table and responses to periods of high or low rainfall.