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  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry dataset. The BGS digital point source urban soil chemistry data (GB_PointSourceUrbanSoilPHE_v1) comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The data is derived from the national, high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also for assessing ecological risk. Although point source PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk, they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. The urban soil chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The point source data is based on an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

  • The 1km Hex Mining Hazard (Not Including Coal) v7 dataset shows areas of known underground mining (Not Including Coal), identified with an indication of the level of hazard associated for each site. The presence of former underground workings, particularly where shallow, may collapse and cause surface settlement which is used to identify potential hazard at each site. The rating is based on a Low (limited mining known to have occurred) to High (underground mining is known to have occurred) scale. The dataset covers areas of known underground working in Great Britain. The coverage is not comprehensive as areas with no evidence of underground working are unclassified. Underground extraction of minerals and rocks has taken place in Great Britain for more than 5000 years. This dataset draws together a range of diverse information; the geology, the primary constraint on distribution; additional information sourced from published literature and knowledge from BGS experts. Derived from the original MiningHazardNotIncludingCoalGB_v7 dataset, this layer generalises these data into a Hex grid format, with an effective hexagonal grid resolution of 2.6km coverage area (side length of 1km). The dataset was created to provide a comprehensive overview of Great Britain's long and complicated mining legacy. It provides essential information for planners and developers working in areas where former underground mine workings may have occurred. Also for anyone involved in the ownership or management of property, including developers, householders and local government.

  • **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1** The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement at a postcode level. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground, and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product evaluates these hazards using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The newGeoSure Insurance Product is updated biannually with new releases of Ordnance Survey Code-Point® data (current version used: 2016.3) and is provided for national coverage across Great Britain (not including the Isle of Man). This product is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp), or MapInfo (*.tab). The newGeoSure Insurance Product is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale, providing 50 m ground resolution.

  • The Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales have updated its groundwater vulnerability map to reflect improvements in data mapping, modelling capability and understanding of the factors affecting vulnerability. Two new maps are available which show the vulnerability of groundwater to a pollutant discharged at ground level. The potential impact of groundwater pollution is considered using the aquifer designation status which provides an indication of the scale and importance of groundwater for potable water supply and/or in supporting baseflow to rivers, lakes and wetlands. This dataset for Wales has shared intellectual property (IP) between Natural Resources Wales and British Geological Survey.

  • The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data are derived by spatial interpolation of the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry data. A unique feature of this dataset is the inclusion for the first time of estimated bioaccessible arsenic and lead data. The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Nickel and Lead in topsoil derived by spatial interpolation of the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry data. Estimated bioaccessible As and Pb concentrations are derived using linear regression models of the relationship between total and bioaccessible concentrations. The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high potentially harmful element (PHE) concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The dataset is based on, and limited to, an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created. This dataset consists of two shape files Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry (As, Cr, Ni) and Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry (Cd, Pb).

  • The BGS Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry Scotland digital soil chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean topsoil concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb). The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) stream sediment data converted to top soil equivalent potentially harmful element(PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers Scotland but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

  • This dataset provides digital spatial information on the location of mineral resources in the central belt of Scotland at a scale of 1:50 000. The term ‘mineral resources’ has a definition under international standards that includes both an economic and geological dimension. These data are based primarily on mapped geology with limited assessment of economics. Therefore, the term ‘mineral resources’ is used here in a broad sense. The dataset allows users to visualise the extent and distribution of mineral resources and to relate them to other forms of land-use (such as urban areas or designated environmentally sensitive areas) or to other factors (such as transport infrastructure and conservation information). The British Geological Survey (BGS) was awarded a grant from the Scottish Government Aggregates Levy Fund in 2007 to provide a comprehensive, relevant and accessible information base to enhance the sustainability of mineral resources for 18 local authorities in the central belt of Scotland. BGS co-funded this project through its Sustainable Mineral Solutions project. This work was completed in March 2008. This dataset comprises the digital GIS files which were produced through this project. In 2020 minor revisions to geometry and attributes were made in in response to minor corrections that were required. The paper maps were not re-released with these data updates. The major elements of minerals information presented are the geological distribution of all mineral resources in the central belt of Scotland. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest.

  • The BGS Stratigraphical Masterpack Series aims to provide high quality biostratigraphical information modules for industry. It is envisaged that the majority of clients will be among the exploration, extraction, construction and consultancy sectors. The topics of these packages are designed, as far as possible,to be relevant to industrial needs by, for example, focusing on a particular frontier exploration area or documenting a fossil group of major interest. They act as practical desk-top guides for routine reference work and are also the basis for in-house staff training. The latest Masterpacks are PC based. There are four titles currently available for purchase from BGS: 1.Reference Collection of British Jurassic Dinoflagellates 2.Jurassic Dinoflagellate Cysts from Skye, NW Scotland 3.Stratigraphic Masterpack on Carboniferous Palynostratigraphy - The Arctic to North Africa 4.Palaeozoic Palynostratigraphy of North Africa, The Middle East & Gulf Region: An Integrated Database

  • The dataset indicates the potential for hazard in Great Britain as a result of mineral extraction. It excludes areas of Coal mining as these are covered by the Coal Authority. It is based on a simple A-E rating scale indicating the increasing likelihood of an underground mining hazard. The data was created using expert knowledge, detailed literature searches, local knowledge and a series of rule based geological constraints applied to the DigMapGB50k (Digital Geological Map of Great Britain) data.

  • Laboratory results for the analysis of geochemical samples (stream sediments, soil and water) collected for the high resolution geochemical mapping of mainland Britain. The programme of regional geochemical sampling began in 1968 in the northern Highlands of Scotland. Sample sites are described on field slips. Chemical results are subjected to high level of quality control in the laboratory. Results are the raw data processed (standardisation and normalisation) to give seamless geochemical images and the value added G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment ) data in the BGS geochemistry database.