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  • The DiGMap Plus dataset is a series of GIS layers describing the engineering, geochemical and geophysical properties of geological materials from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m depth (ie the uppermost c.2m of geology). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core characteristics relating to their lithologies. The 'Resistivity' dataset covers England, Scotland and Wales and characterises the material resistivity (based on modelled distributions of clay and moisture content, to 2m depth.

  • The data comprises a GIS layers representing the permeability of Superficial geological deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale, 1:625:000, is used. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises GIS layers representing the permeability of mass movement deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000,. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through mass movement deposits and the ability of a unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The Insurance Data give an index level assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to create financial insurance loss. The methodology is based on the 6 GeoSure individual hazard assessments. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • The GeoSure datasets and related reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement due to six types of natural geological hazard, in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMapGB-50 (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • An important paper archive of a wide variety of miscellaneous geological information organised on the basis of its location within 1:50 000 scale geological map sheet areas in Great Britain. The majority of the data has been produced or collected by BGS staff since 1835 as part of the mapping programme. The data may not fit into any of the main collections, but is valuable for future projects and answering enquiries.

  • The Samburu - Marsabit Geological Mapping and Mineral Exploration Project was a joint Kenyan and British technical co-operation project, carried out by staff of the Mines and Geological Department, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Kenya and staff from the British Geological Survey. The first phase of the project commenced in 1980, and covered the area between 36degrees and 38degrees E and from the equator to 2degrees N. The second phase, carried out between 1984 and 1986 covered the area between 36degrees and 38degrees E and from 2degrees N to the Ethiopian border. Sampling was carried out concurrently with geological mapping and was largely constrained by the requirements of that exercise. Little or no sampling was done in areas previously mapped by other bodies. Sampling was mainly confined to areas underlain by basement rocks of the Mozambique Belt and was very sparse over most of the Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic cover. Chemical analyses for the stream sediments were: Ag, Ba, Co, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn. Raw data is available from the Mines and Geological Survey Department, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Nairobi, Kenya. Sampling densities varied considerably across the Phase 1 project area, but generally a stream sediment sample density of one per 4 to 8 km2 and a panned concentrate density of one per 13 to 16 km2 was achieved. In the Phase 2 area, which was mainly very arid, a few samples were collected from dry stream beds, as part of a helicopter survey of the area, to provide some idea of the geochemistry of the major lithological units. Stream sediments were collected by combining grab samples from 5 to 10 points within a 10m radius of the selected site. If necessary the samples were dried before being sieved and the fine (-80 mesh B.S.) fraction retained for analysis. Heavy mineral concentrates were obtained by taking 2 to 5kg of material from the sample site and panning at the base camp, where water was available, or at the Mines and Geological Department headquarters at Nairobi.

  • Recordings of earthquakes and other signals (such as quarry blasts, explosions, sonic booms and collapses) made by a network of seismometers and similar sensors across the UK. Recordings start in 1977 (with a few events recorded before this) and continue to the present day. Data is used for monitoring of seismic activity, studies of seismic hazard and scientific study of the Earth's interior. Data is freely available on request. Some data can be retrieved from the BGS AutoDRM (Automatic Data Request Manager) service. Time series data recorded by UK seismic networks.

  • Over 22000 km of corrected aeromagnetic total intensity data from various surveys in offshore petroleum areas in UK Continental Shelf and overseas collected to assist directional drilling. Line separation is 2 km and flight altitude is 80 m above sea level and navigation is by GPS (Global Positioning System). Some surveys have been bought or commissioned on an exclusive basis by BGS and can be used without further ado, others require permission sought from the aeromagnetic survey company or end-client.

  • GeoScholar is a set of free geological data - available in GIS format - for UK universities and the higher education sector, to support teaching and learning within the geosciences. The dataset includes digital geological map data from BGS, aerial photos from Infoterra, NEXTmap digital terrain model from Intermap Technologies, borehole data and their corresponding logs, several BGS geological map sheets. Each Geoscholar teaching package will include 12 different geographical regions, including Assynt, Coniston and South West Wales.