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  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Determination of water solubility limits in CO2 mixtures to deliver water specification levels for CO2 transportation was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-21. Studies of the phase behaviour and water solubility of pure and impure CO2 are of great relevance to the transport phase of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) process. For transport through carbon steel pipelines, CO2 and any impurities present must be present as a single phase to avoid corrosion, and subsequent loss of pipeline integrity. Trace impurities such as H2 and N2 have been shown to alter the phase behaviour of the CO2 at high pressure. Understanding the effect of these impurities on the solubility of H2O in CO2 is vital to confirm the safety and viability of CO2 transport through carbon steel pipelines.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Experimental investigation with PACT facility and CFD modelling of oxy-coal combustion with recycling real flue gas was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-27. Oxy-coal combustion technology has gained confidence and maturity especially within the last decade (Santos S. 2012) compared to the much earlier studies (Kimura et al., 1995; Wang et al., 1988). However, there are still a number of research challenges associated with flue gas recycling, gas clean-up and plant scale tools and models. Flue gas recycling affects the purity of CO2, oxygen mixing, and ignition of coal particles and flame stability. There is lack of experimental data with real flue gas recycling or treated vent gas recycling, which is one of the available options to achieve the target of zero emissions (Hack et al., 2011), at pilot-scale for the validation of CFD models. The project focuses on the following tasks: • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion, ignition and flame stability with the 250kWth PACT Oxy-Coal Combustion furnace with real and simulated flue gas recycling • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion ignition and flame stability with a laboratory visual drop tube furnace • CFD simulation of the 250kWth PACT Oxy-coal combustion furnace.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Multiscale characterization of CO2 storage in the United Kingdom, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-197.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Investigating the radiative heat flux in small and large scale oxy-coal furnaces for CFD model development and system scale up, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-193.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Novel Materials and Reforming Processing Route for the Production of Ready-Separated CO2/N2/H2 from Natural Gas Feedstocks, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-181.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Quantifying Residual and Dissolution Trapping in the CO2CRC Otway Injection Site was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-204. For a wide adoption of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology, it is essential to provide a commercial operator with a reassurance of the predictability of their proposed site for CO2 storage through geochemical monitoring techniques. This is particular important for assessing residual and solubility trapping, which are more secure than structural trapping of free-phase CO2. It is difficult to quantify how much CO2 is stored by residual and solubility trapping across an entire storage site. Hence, there is a need to develop a test which can be performed at a single injection well during assessment of a potential site for CO2 injection. CO2CRC, one of the world-leading CCS research organisations, conducted the Otway Stage 2B Extension residual saturation test in December 2014 to determine residual trapping at their Otway test site in Victoria, Australia, using a single-well field setting. In direct collaboration with CO2CRC and other global research institutions (CSIRO Energy, University of Melbourne, Simon Fraser University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), we use water and gas geochemistry to establish the fate of CO2 injected into the Paaratte Formation at the Otway test site. More specifically, we study the application of oxygen isotopes and noble gases to reconstruct levels of residual trapping of CO2.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Multiscale characterization of CO2 storage in the United Kingdom, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-197.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Investigating the radiative heat flux in small and large scale oxy-coal furnaces for CFD model development and system scale up, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-193.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Shelter and Escape in the Event of a Release of CO2 from CCS Infrastructure (S-CAPE) was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-179. Pipelines are acknowledged as one of the most efficient and cost-effective methods for transporting large volumes of various fluids over long distances and therefore the majority of proposed schemes for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) involve high pressure pipelines transporting CO2. In order to manage the risk in the event of the failure of a carbon dioxide (CO2) pipeline, it is a core requirement that a separation distance between pipelines and habitable dwellings is defined to ensure a consistent level of risk. The aim of this project is to develop validated and computationally efficient shelter and escape models describing the consequences to the surrounding population of a CO2 release from CCS transportation infrastructure. The models will allow pipeline operators, regulators and standard setters to make informed and appropriate decisions regarding pipeline safety and emergency response. This poster presents some preliminary findings from the S-Cape project and: • Describes the development of analytical and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models to calculate the change in internal CO2 concentration within a building engulfed by a dispersing cloud of CO2. • Investigates the sensitivity of the CO2 concentration within a building to wind speed and the temperature of the CO2 in the pipeline. • Demonstrates how CFD models can be used to verify results obtained using computationally efficient analytical models.

  • This review details the laboratory experiments that have investigated leakage of geologically stored CO2 (as of June 2013). These experiments have covered a range of leakage factors. Knowledge of these factors can both compliment and help inform any future experiments at the QICS site. As such, the report details what experiments have been performed in the lab to date, how lab experiments can inform QICS and how QICS could inform laboratory experiments. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-31.