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  • The dataset is a 40 year control run of a NEMO-based 1/12 degree grid spacing model of the Southern Ocean as part of the ORCHESTRA (Ocean Regulation of Climate by Heat and Carbon Sequestration and Transports) LTS-M project. It uses the NEMO "extended" grid, although ice cavities are closed. The model was run on Archer, the national HPC platform. The dataset covers the full length of the model run and includes regular (5 day mean) output of the model state, as well as more frequent (1 day mean) output of surface variables and fluxes and 1 month mean of more extensive transport diagnostics. This is the second of two control runs and was initialised from the end of the 30th year (nominally 1978) of CORE2NYF (Munday et al., 2021), a 3+37 year control run forced with CORE2 (corrected normal year forcing version 2.0) normal year forcing. Forced by JRA55-do, an interannually-varying forcing set (Tsujino et al., 2018). With some additional forcing as supplied by the UK Met Office (freshwater runoff, tidal friction, geothermal heating) and additional freshwater runoff to suppress polynya formation.

  • The dataset is a 20 year experiment using a NEMO-based 1/12 degree grid spacing model of the Southern Ocean as part of the ORCHESTRA (Ocean Regulation of Climate by Heat and Carbon Sequestration and Transports) LTS-M project. It uses the NEMO "extended" grid, although ice cavities are closed. The model was run on Archer, the national HPC platform. The dataset covers the full length of the model run and includes regular (5 day mean) output of the model state, as well as more frequent (1 day mean) output of surface variables and fluxes and 1 month mean of more extensive transport diagnostics. The experiment neglects the ocean surface current in the bulk formula calculations for surface fluxes, so-called absolute wind stress. It starts from the end of 1987 of JRA55IAF (Munday et al., 2021). Forced by JRA55-do, an interannually-varying forcing set (Tsujino et al., 2018). With some additional forcing as supplied by the UK Met Office (freshwater runoff, tidal friction, geothermal heating) and additional freshwater runoff to suppress polynya formation.

  • This dataset contains provides the final best estimates of fluxes, mean environmental variables and derived transfer coefficient estimates, along with asociated quality control flags, during the Icebreaker Oden voyage durning the Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) in summer 2014. These were calculated based on instrumentation data from the University of Leeds' Metek sonic anemometer, Licor LI-7500 gas analyzer and XSENS MTi-G-700 motion pack, plus mean surface meteorology data provided from the automatic weather station operated on board by the Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University (MISU). Other data from the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements. The document "ACSE_turbulent_fluxes_readme.txt" in the archive contains fuller details of the flux calculations. The final data, prepared for archiving as NetCDF data at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds, contain: 1) The final quality controlled best estimates of 20-min averaged dynamic fluxes, associated mean environmental variables (10m wind, etc), transfer coefficients, and quality control flags. 2) The raw kinematic fluxes, etc that go into generating (1), along with the quality control variables used in generating the QC flags, and the QC flags. 3) Other environmental variables (in some cases with duplicates from multiple different sensors) averaged onto the same time base as the flux estimates. The authors note that in all cases a lot of work has been done on quality control and applying suitable corrections to raw measurements. In many cases other choices could have been made, and additional QC measures may need to be applied. Most of the work on the flux data processing has been done by John Prytherch, with additional input from Ian Brooks and Dominic Salisbury. Additional work on ancillary data was undertaken by other members of the ACSE science team.

  • The dataset is a 37 year control run of a NEMO-based 1/12 degree grid spacing model of the Southern Ocean as part of the ORCHESTRA LTS-M project. It uses the NEMO "extended" grid, although ice cavities are closed. The model was run on Archer, the national HPC platform. The dataset covers the full length of the model run (excluding a three year spinup period) and includes regular (5 day mean) output of the model state, as well as more frequent (1 day mean) output of surface variables and fluxes and 1 month mean of more extensive transport diagnostics. Forced by the GFDL (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory) CORE2 (corrected normal year forcing version 2.0) normal year forcing. With some additional forcing as supplied by the UK Met Office (freshwater runoff, tidal friction, geothermal heating) and additional freshwater runoff to suppress polynya formation. Initialised from January of a climatology of ECCOv4r2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean) in nominal year 1948.

  • Monthly output from an integration of the GO6 configuration of the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean and sea-ice model, forced by the CORE2 (Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments version 2.0) corrected inter-annual forcing (CIAF) surface field dataset. UK Global Ocean GO6 consists of version 3.6 of NEMO and version 5.2.1 of the CICE (Community Ice CodE) sea-ice model, and the present simulation is on the global eORCA025 1/4° grid. The ocean is initialised from a climatology based on the EN3 monthly objective analysis (Ingleby and Huddleston, 2007) averaged over years 2004–2008, and is integrated from 1958 to 2007. The model was run on the Archer supercomputing platform through the Rose/Cylc interface on Puma, and the run ID on the Puma system is u-ap795. The integrations were funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) under the Atlantic Climate System Integrated Study (ACSIS) project (NE/N018044/1).

  • This dataset contains a range of parameters from a 1 km gridded output from runs of version 3.6.1 of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model deployed on the ARCHER UK National Supercomputing Service. These runs were part of the NERC funded BBUBL project (Biotelemetry/Bio-aerial-platforms for the Urban Boundary Layer - also known as City Flocks, NERC grant award NE/N003195/1). The domain of the model runs was over the set over Birmingham conurbation for all of 2015. This geo-temporal domain encompasses measurements of the urban boundary layer obtained from instrumentation attached to birds flown around the area. See related dataset. The WRF model set up followed that used by Heaviside et al. (2015) - see linked documentation for details - and was run on the ARCHER UK National Supercomputing Service. Meteorology data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-interim reanalysis data for initial and lateral boundary conditions. The WRF v3.6.1 model set up implemented in this study included four nested domains. The domains had grid resolutions of 36 km x 36 km, 12 km x 12 km, 3 km x 3 km and 1 km x 1 km. The finest domain covered the West Midlands, centering over Birmingham. The multi-layer building energy parametrization (BEP) scheme with three land-use types (low-intensity residential, high-intensity residential and industrial/commercial) was also used.

  • ERA-Interim is the latest European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) global atmospheric reanalysis of the period 1979 to August 2019. This follows on from the ERA-15 and ERA-40 re-analysis projects. The dataset includes monthly mean of daily mean surface level data on a reduced N256 Gaussian grid.

  • This dataset contains ship navigation data, including speed over group, course, heading etc, fomr the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat's (SPRS) Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. These data are provided as supportive data for use with the other datasets within this collection, helping to account for ship movement during the expedition for later data analysis. These data were prepared for archiving as NetCDF data at the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.