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  • The 5km Hex GS Collapsible Deposits dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Collapsible Deposits v8 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements.

  • The 5km Hex GS Shrink Swell dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Shrink Swell v8 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Shrink Swell methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to shrink and swell. Many soils contain clay minerals that absorb water when wet (making them swell), and lose water as they dry (making them shrink). This shrink-swell behaviour is controlled by the type and amount of clay in the soil, and by seasonal changes in the soil moisture content (related to rainfall and local drainage). The rock formations most susceptible to shrink-swell behaviour are found mainly in the south-east of Britain. Clay rocks elsewhere in the country are older and have been hardened by burial deep in the earth and are less able to absorb water. The BGS has carried out detailed geotechnical and mineralogical investigations into rock types known to shrink, and are modelling their properties across the near surface. This research underpins guidance contained in the national GeoSure dataset, and is the basis for our responses to local authorities, companies and members of the public who require specific information on the hazard in their areas. The BGS is undertaking a wide-ranging research programme to investigate this phenomenon by identifying those areas most at risk and developing sustainable management solutions. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

  • UK continental shelf seabed sediment data at 1:1 million scale. This data layer is the BGS contribution to the OneGeology project, providing UK onshore geological data at 1:625 000 scale and UK continental shelf seabed sediment data at 1:1 million scale.

  • The GeoSure datasets and related reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement due to six types of natural geological hazard, in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMapGB-50 (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • BGS GeoScour v2 provides river scour susceptibility information for Great Britain using a three-tiered data provision allowing increasing levels of understanding at different resolutions from catchment to local (channel/reach) scales. GeoScour v2 includes 18 GIS layers, providing information on the natural characteristics and properties of catchment and riverine environments for the assessment of river scour in Great Britain. The dataset product fills a gap in current scour modelling, with the input of geological properties. It provides an improved toolkit to more easily assess and raise the profile of scour risk, now and in the future, to help infrastructure providers and funders prioritise resources, identify remedial works to preclude costly and prevent disruptive failures. The product has broad applications through its adaptation to suit multiple types of asset susceptible to fluvial erosion. GeoScour looks specifically at the geological factors that influence scour and does not consider any hydraulic or hydrodynamic factors. The GeoScour Dataset Product is designed to be used by multiple stakeholders with differing needs and therefore, can be interrogated at a number of levels. Tier 1 A catchment stability dataset provides a summary overview of the catchment characteristics, typical response type, and evolution. It can be used as a high-level overview for incorporation into catchment management plans, national reviews and catchment comparisons using Tier 2 datasets are available as smaller catchment areas and focusses on providing data for more detailed catchment management, natural flood management and similar uses. It analyses geological properties such as flood accommodation space, catchment run-off potential, geomorphology types, and additional summary statistics for worst, average, and best-case scenarios for underlying surface geology scour susceptibility, as well as additional summary statistics of key environmental parameters such as protected sites and urban coverage. Tier 3 datasets provide the detailed riverine information that is designed to be incorporated into more complex river scour models. It provides the baseline geological context for river scour development and processes and identifies important factors that should be considered in any scour model. Factors such as material mineralogy, strength and density are key properties that can influence a river’s ability to scour. In addition, an assessment of river fall, sinuosity and flood accommodation space is also provided. This data is of use to those assessing the propensity for river scour for any given reach of a river across Great Britain and can be used as an input into hydraulic/hydrodynamic models. Tier 1 and 2 datasets are Open Government Licence (OGL), Tier 3 is licenced.

  • The BGS GeoCoast Dataset is a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based analysis for indicating multi-hazards and interdependencies within the coastal zone of Great Britain (not including Orkney and Shetland). GeoCoast represents the natural geological coastline (around the mainland of Great Britain) as if no coastal defences or made ground are present. This will be of particular value in areas where coastal defences are no longer maintained. GeoCoast will offer anyone with assets, or an interest in the coastline around Great Britain, access to easy-to-use datasets linked to geohazard data. This will allow users to interpret potential interdependencies in terms of erosion, flooding, habitat and other vulnerabilities. These datasets are divided into two data packages: Premium and Open datasets, which include the following information: The data is delivered in GIS ESRI point, polyline and polygon format (other formats available on request).

  • Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. The joint UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) (formerly Public Health England (PHE) ) - British Geological Survey (BGS) digital Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. UKHSA (formerly PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average is at or above 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3). This is termed the Action Level. UK Health Security Agency defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. The Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain presents a simplified version of the radon potential for Great Britain with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The joint UKHSA-BGS digital radon potential for Great Britain provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Great Britain.

  • Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. The joint UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) (formerly Public Health England (PHE)) - British Geological Survey (BGS) digital dataset Radon Potential for Great Britain provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Great Britain. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. UK Health Security Agency (formerly PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average is at or above 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3). This is termed the Action Level. The UKHSA defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. The dataset allows an estimate to be made of the probability that an individual property is at or above the Action Level for radon. This information provides an answer to one of the standard legal enquiries on house purchase in England and Wales, known as CON29 standard Enquiry of Local Authority; 3.13 Radon Gas: Location of the Property in a Radon Affected Area. Radon Potential for Great Britain also provides information on the level of protection required for new buildings as described in the latest Building Research Establishment guidance on radon protective measures for new buildings (Radon: guidance on protective measures for new dwellings; BR 211, 2015 in Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland). This radon potential hazard information for Great Britain is based on UKHSA indoor radon measurements and BGS digital geology information. This product was derived from BGS Geology 50k (formerly known as DigMap50k) version 8 and UKHSA in-house radon measurement data. The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the UKHSA. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is under licence.

  • This dataset comprises river centrelines, digitised from OS 1:50,000 mapping. It consists of four components: rivers; canals; surface pipes (man-made channels for transporting water such as aqueducts and leats); and miscellaneous channels (including estuary and lake centre-lines and some underground channels). This dataset is a representation of the river network in Great Britain as a set of line segments, i.e. it does not comprise a geometric network.

  • This dataset contains existing and potential areas of habitats associated with calcareous, coastal, upland and lowland heath landscapes. The dataset was initially created to provide a sampling framework for a field survey carried out in 1992 and 1993 by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (later part of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology). It was derived from a range of geology, soils, altitude and land cover data (as described fully in the supporting information). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dc583be3-3649-4df6-b67e-b0f40b4ec895