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  • Water samples have predominantly been collected by the G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) project at an average sampling density of one sample per 1.5 km square. Samples have been collected from approximately 85% of Great Britain but it is only from Wales and Humber-Trent southwards that a wide range of analytes have been determined. Currently G-BASE stream water samples collected from high order streams are determined by ICP-AES for 27 elements - Sr, Cd, Ba, Si, Mn, Fe, P, S (as SO42-), B, Mg, V, Na, Mo, Al, Be, Ca, Zn, Cu, Pb, Li, Zr, Co, Ni, Y, La, K and Cr; and by quadrupole ICP-MS for 24 trace elements - Li, Be, Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, As, Rb, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Tl, Pb, Th and U. Automated colorimetric methods are used to determine Cl and NO3- and ion selective electrode is used to determine F. Waters are also analysed for non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC) to determine dissolved organic carbon content. All samples have routinely been analysed for pH, conductivity and bicarbonate. Much of the UK coverage also includes uranium and fluoride analyses.

  • Profile soil analyses are available from a number of BGS programmes, notably the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP) and the Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) programme. Sampling depth and range of analytes determined is very variable for the MRP. G-BASE samples are consistently from 35 - 50 cm though since 2003 it has become routine practice in the G-BASE project to collect a top soil and deeper profile sample from the same site but only analyses the top soil and store the profile soil. This also applies in urban areas. The G-BASE profile soils were generally sieved to 150 microns before analysis and determined by XRFS for some or all of: Mg, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, V, Cr, Co, Ba, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pb, Bi, Th, U, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Ge, Sc, Se, Br, Hf, Ta, W, Tl, Te and I. MRP samples can include profile samples from greater than 1 meter collected using a power auger and also include till samples. The G-BASE samples are collected at a density of 1 sample per two square kilometres in rural areas and 4 samples every kilometre square in urban areas. MRP sampling was more site specific generally collecting soil samples along lines at spacing intervals generally 25 - 250 m.

  • The map based index includes outlines for some 8,000 opencast coal prospecting sites dating from the 1940s until the mid 1990s. The index leads to information on the records of some 1 million boreholes (additional to those shown in the Borehole Records layer) drilled during site exploration and also the accompanying plans and other data, all filed in 3,618 boxes. The sites include those that have been drilled and not worked and also those that have been exploited. The original data, hardcopy maps, were received from the Coal Authority in 2001.

  • The map shows the location of excess sample materials from the G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment) geochemistry project:- stream sediments, panned heavy mineral concentrates and soils are stored long term in the National Geoscience Data Centre and are available for use in other projects. The Minerals Programme (incorporating the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme) sample collection contains reference samples of drill cores, rocks, tills, soils, stream sediments and panned concentrates. These samples were collected in the period 1974 - to date in mineralised and potentially mineralised areas of the United Kingdom, principally in the northern and western Britain.

  • This layer shows data collected mainly by the Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) programme. Geochemical data are available for soil samples for the Humber-Trent and East Anglia atlas areas (see the Geochemical atlas areas layer). Samples for East Midlands and part of Southeast England have been collected and are currently either undergoing analysis or data conditioning. More than twenty urban areas have also been sampled and top soil analyses are available for these urban areas (Belfast, Cardiff, Corby, Coventry, Derby, Doncaster, Glasgow, Hull, Ipswich, Leicester, Lincoln, Manchester, Mansfield, Northampton, Nottingham, Peterborough, Scunthorpe, Sheffield, Swansea, Stoke, Telford, Wolverhampton and York). Regional samples are collected at an average density of one site per 2 square kilometres, urban sampling is at a density of 4 samples per square kilometre. Top soil samples are collected at a depth of 5 - 20cm. It is sieved through a 2mm mesh and milled to less than 150 microns. The data include analyses for some or all of the following elements by XRFS: Mg, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, V, Cr, Co, Ba, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pb, Bi, Th, U, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Ge, Sc, Se, Br, Hf, Ta, W, Tl, Te and I. Loss on Ignition (LOI) and pH (in a slurry of 0.01 M CaCl2 ) is now routinely determined on 50% of regional and all urban samples.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of available Hydrogeological Maps which have been published at various scales, covering areas ranging in size from the whole of England and Wales, Northern Ireland and to Jersey. They display information on surface water features, the three dimensional geometry of aquifers, groundwater levels, abstractions and quality including saline intrusion in varying amounts of detail.

  • This layer of the GeoIndex shows the location of available 1:50000 scale digital geological maps within Great Britain. The Digital Geological Map of Great Britain project (DiGMapGB) has prepared 1:625 000, 1:250 000 and 1:50 000 scale datasets for England, Wales and Scotland. The datasets themselves are available as vector data in a variety of formats in which they are structured into themes primarily for use in geographical information systems (GIS) where they can be integrated with other types of spatial data for analysis and problem solving in many earth-science-related issues. Most of the 1:50 000 scale geological maps for England & Wales and for Scotland are now available digitally as part of the DiGMapGB-50 dataset. It integrates geological information from a variety of sources. These include recent digital maps, older 'paper only' maps, and desk compilations for sheets with no published maps.

  • The UK Onshore Geophysical Library was established in 1994 in conjunction with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the UK Onshore Operators Group (UKOOG). The Library manages the archive and official release of seismic data recorded over landward areas of the UK. By agreement with the DTI and HMSO, the Library operates as a registered charity, funded by revenues raised from data sales and donations, with the long term objective of bringing all available UK onshore digital seismic data into secure archival storage, whilst providing efficient access to all interested parties. BGS has access to the data at cost of copying only for science budget work. Data index on the BGS Geoscience Data Index.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of land and marine gravity observations on the UK mainland, Northern Ireland, offshore islands, tidal estuaries and seabed. Most of the surveys were carried out by the BGS but the database includes data originally acquired by other organisations and subsequently given to the BGS to be managed as part of the national archive. Complete coverage of the UK mainland with a station density of 1-2 stations per square kilometre. Unadjusted ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry data acquired by BGS as part of its Offshore Reconnaisance Mapping Programme. Unadjusted ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry data acquired by BGS as part of its Offshore Reconnaisance Mapping Programme. This programme commenced in 1967, and was funded mainly by the Department of Energy. Marine gravity readings are from unadjusted ship gravity and bathymetry data from various commercial and academic surveys between 1965 and 1994. Confidential M.O.D Hydrographic Office integrated ship gravity and magnetics surveys of NW Europe marine areas for which BGS acts as agent. Network adjusted gravity and magnetic compilations of data from BGS and non-BGS sources.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the locations of the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme Reports within Great Britain. The Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP), funded by the Department for Trade and Industry (DTI), carried out mineral exploration reconnaissance in Great Britain between 1972 and 1997. The programme provided geological, geochemical, geophysical, mineralogical and metallogenic information on prospective areas in Britain. Work was carried out at various scales, from regional reconnaissance surveys or appraisal, to the drilling of a geochemical or geophysical anomaly. Projects were multidisciplinary, and used a combination of tried and tested methods, together with innovative techniques arising from research and development programmes. By the end of the Programme in 1997, 146 MRP reports had been issued covering localities across the UK. The programme was very successful in that more than half the projects reported attracted significant commercial follow-up resulting in the discovery of many new prospects. The reports themselves are being made available, for free, to downlaod over the next twelve months.