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  • The study in three coal mining regions: Lower Silesia, Upper Silesia and Lublin (each N=500) was conducted using Computer Assisted Web Interview (CAWI). The questionnaire includes the block of questions concerning mine water awareness, climate change and local/place attachment. The survey online took 15 to 20 minutes and was prepared after in-depth pilot research among participants with different education level from the mining regions. We used the uninformed approach to the survey, so there were no additional questions nor requirements for participants prior to the survey. Since the mine water energy extraction is a technical issue that is neither well known nor commonly used in the narratives of Poles, we tested survey questions with pilot cognitive interviews to remove the technical language and reduce the number of replies without understanding. The interviews were conducted with 10 participants in July 2020 and due to the pilot's recommendations and results, we implemented additional changes in the final version of the questionnaire. Specifically, some questions were simplified and the background information on mine water extraction was simplified and shortened The survey CAWI was completed by adult people aged 18-65 (N=1500) between 14-19 August 2020 by Kantar Research Agency. The sample was constructed using KANTAR’s internet panel profiled for the basic demographics, such as gender, age, and the town size. Particular attention paid to the quality of the panel is reflected in its structure. Kantar’s internet panel reflects the profile of the Polish population of Internet users in terms of its participants’ demographic characteristics. The sample from each region was 500 respondents and among the full sample (N=1500) we reached only 192 people who chose to call “mining areas” as best description of the area where they live. Although the three voivodships were chosen due to its mining industry the selected sample covers the region in general in which mining communities are statically not fully represented. We also asked about the subjective perception of the area respondents live in, which we further analysed with spatial distribution. The dataset was created within SECURe project (Subsurface Evaluation of CCS and Unconventional Risks) - https://www.securegeoenergy.eu/. This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 764531

  • Pyrite samples from selected sedimentary organic-rich formations or associated igneous and metamorphic rocks were analysed by conventional S isotopic analysis. Pyrites were measured in order to provide insights into their origin. Light and variable S isotope compositions in pyrite have been used to infer the influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (and subsequent Se precipitation by sulphate-reducing microbes), whereas heavier S isotope compositions indicate a non-biological origin (i.e. physical and chemical diagenesis).

  • Neodymium (Nd) concentrations, Nd radiogenic isotopes (143Nd/144Nd) and Nd stable isotopes (d146/144Nd) for chondritic meteorites, terrestrial basalts and mantle rocks, and rock reference materials.

  • The data includes field chemistry, major and minor ions (ICP-MS and IC), nutrients (DOC), and tracers (Tritium, CFCs, SF6, δ18O, δ2H, δ13CDIC) collected in Nigeria and Mali in 2010. There is a brief description of the source, depth and completion date of the borehole, type of pump, estimated village population and estimated rainfall. Work funded by UK Department for International Development.

  • Data on the average aspect ratio (length/width) and average length of plagioclase grains in dykes and sills, used to demonstrate that the solidification regime is a function of the orientation of tabular intrusions. The data are written up, with publication expected in Journal of Petrology.

  • Geochemical and field data collected from samples from ore deposits hosted in the Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus by Dr Andrew Martin during his PhD. File T1 contains sample names, locations and description and file T2 contains photographs and field observations for sample localities. File T3 contains portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from powdered Troodos ophiolite samples. Files T4 - T8 contain sulphide trace element data from laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis of samples from various deposits in the Troodos ophiotlite. Files T9 and T10 contain bulk sample geochemistry from aqua regia digest and ICP-MS for deposits from the Troodos ophiolite. File T11 contains results from conventional ä34S analysis of sulfide minerals from Troodos deposits and file T12 contains x-ray diffraction analysis data from silica-rich deposits in the Troodos ophiolite. Data is used in papers available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oregeorev.2019.01.024, https://doi.org/10.1180/mgm.2018.81 and https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2019.119325 and in Dr Andrew Martin's PhD thesis, available at http://orca.cf.ac.uk/124346/.

  • We present new age models for the Ediacaran-Cambrian which lacks a robust global temporal framework. This interval marks the radiation of animals, but there are major uncertainties in the evolutionary dynamics of this critical radiation and its relationship to changes in palaeoenvironmental changes. Here we present global data from 130 successions that enable us to create four new possible global age models (A to D) for the interval 551–517 million years ago (Ma). These models comprise composite carbonate carbon isotope (δ13Ccarb) curves, which are anchored to radiometric ages and consistent with strontium isotope chemostratigraphy, and are used to calibrate metazoan distribution in space and time. These models differ most prominently in the temporal position of the basal Cambrian negative δ13Ccarb excursion (BACE). Two age models (A and B) place the BACE within the Ediacaran, and yield an age of ~538.8 Ma for the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary; however models C and D appear to be the most parsimonious and may support a recalibration of the boundary age by up to 3 Myr younger. All age models reveal a previously underappreciated degree of variability in the terminal Ediacaran, incorporating notable positive and negative excursions that precede the BACE. Nothwithstanding remaining uncertainties in chemostratigraphic correlation, all models support a pre-BACE first appearance of Cambrian-type shelly fossils in Siberia and possibly South China, and show that the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition was a protracted interval represented by a series of successive radiations. Data were compiled by Fred Bowyer, with support from Andrey Yu. Zhuravlev, Rachel Wood, Maoyan Zhu, Graham Shields, Ying Zhou, Chuang Yang, Simon Poulton, Dan Condon, Andrew Curtis.

  • A single Excel spreadsheet giving augite-plagioclase-plagioclase dihedral angle populations in cumulates from the Rustenberg Layered Suite of the Bushveld Igneous Complex. A document providing the background information and location of the samples used in the study. The data have been published: Holness et al. (2017) Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 172:102 doi.org/10.1007/s00410-017-1423-4

  • Clay minerals (smectites) were synthesised experimentally to determine isotope fractionation factors (Li and Mg). The data are provided here. Interpretation is ongoing.

  • This set of data is the second set of impact interviews conducted with the target communities of the BRAVE project. The interviews are transcriptions in Microsoft word. The communities involved in the data collection were from Tomo and Poa in Burkina Faso and Jawani and Tariganga in Ghana. There are 32 interviews from Burkinabe community members, and 23 from the Ghanaian communities. Individuals were selected based on their participation in the BRAVE field activity of the Farmer Voice Radio. The data was collected between October 2019 and February 2020 by the local researchers. This data methodology was built on the initial vulnerability assessments, and include questions around behaviour change and income change based on the BRAVE communities activities of ground water measurement and water management strategies. This data shows behaviour and livelihood change within the communities and due to these activities. This is final qualitative impacts dataset from the BRAVE project. Previous linked data sets include the baseline vulnerability assessments and the first round of impact interviews. BRAVE: Building understanding of climate variability into planning of groundwater supplies from low storage aquifers in Africa BRAVE is a ‘Consortium’ research project is part of the UPGro (Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor) programme.