Keyword

AEROSOLS

11 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 11
  • The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), formerly known as the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), is a set of high quality, remote-sounding research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the stratosphere. These stations, where ozone and key ozone-related parameters are measured, are complemented by both secondary stations and satellite measurements. Following five years of planning, instrument design and implementation, the NDACC began network operations in January 1991. The dataset contains high quality measurements of a wide range of stratospheric chemical species and parameters derived from instruments operated at a number of ground stations around the world.

  • The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), formely known as the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), is a set of high quality, remote-sounding research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the stratosphere. These stations, where ozone and key ozone-related parameters are measured, are complemented by both secondary stations and satellite measurements. Following five years of planning, instrument design and implementation, the NDACC began network operations in January 1991. The dataset contains high quality measurements of a wide range of stratospheric chemical species and parameters derived from instruments operated at a number of ground stations around the world.

  • The Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) measured vertical profiles of temperature and concentrations of ozone, methane, water vapour, nitrogen oxides, and other important species, including CFCs, in the stratosphere. CLAES also maps the horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosols in the stratosphere. These measurements are analysed to better understand the photochemical, radiative, and dynamical processes taking place in the ozone layer. The dataset contains Two .tar data files . Data are level 3A product (gridded in time and latitude along the satellite track) between 80N - 80S, 10-60 Km, October 1991 - May 1993. This dataset is public.

  • The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) measured vertical profiles of temperature and a number of atmospheric constituents. An instrument on board UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) measured global stratospheric and mesospheric temperature, CO, H2O, CH4, O3, HNO3, N2O5, NO2, N2O and aerosol extinction. Gridded, global measurements between 80S and 80N, October 1991 - July 1992. This data is the raw level 3 version 0008, v0009, v0010. The data is as found on the mission ground segment support computer.

  • The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) measured vertical profiles of temperature and a number of atmospheric constituents. An instrument on board UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) measured global stratospheric and mesospheric temperature, CO, H2O, CH4, O3, HNO3, N2O5, NO2, N2O and aerosol extinction. Gridded, global measurements between 80S and 80N, October 1991 - July 1992. This data is the raw level 0 and engineering data used in calibration. The data is as found on the mission ground segment support computer.

  • The Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) measured vertical profiles of temperature and concentrations of ozone, methane, water vapour, nitrogen oxides, and other important species, including CFCs, in the stratosphere. CLAES also maps the horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosols in the stratosphere. These measurements are analysed to better understand the photochemical, radiative, and dynamical processes taking place in the ozone layer. This is the third version of CLAES data to be put into the public domain on the NASA-GDAAC. The dataset contains O3, ClONO2, F11, HNO3, N2O, N2O5, NO2, aerosols and temperature measurements. Data are level 3A product (gridded in time and latitude along the satellite track) between 80N - 80S, 10-60 Km, October 1991 - May 1993. This dataset is public.

  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data.

  • The Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) measured vertical profiles of temperature and concentrations of ozone, methane, water vapour, nitrogen oxides, and other important species, including CFCs, in the stratosphere. CLAES also maps the horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosols in the stratosphere. These measurements are analysed to better understand the photochemical, radiative, and dynamical processes taking place in the ozone layer. This is the version of the data set as stored in the UCSS catalogue on the CDHF. The dataset contains CH4, NO, H20 and CF2Cl2 measurements . Data are level 3A product (gridded in time and latitude along the satellite track) between 80N - 80S, 10-60 Km, October 1991 - May 1993. This dataset is public.

  • The Cambridge Chemical Assimilation Data was produced as part of the Assimilation of Remote-sensed Data for Applications in the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences (ARDAAOS) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) thematic programme. It presents Chemical assimilation data from multiple sources, which is processed into a common file format making it easy to compare data from the various field campaigns and satellite missions.

  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data.