Keyword

ATMOSPHERICPRESSURE

9 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
From 1 - 9 / 9
  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data. The DC-8 aircraft flew at the lowermost extremities of the hole and deployed a combination of remote sounding of the overlying atmosphere with some in situ sampling. Vertical distributions of ozone and aerosols above the cruising altitude of the aircraft and within the hole were mapped. The DC-8 collected ozone and aerosol profiles overhead by LIDAR; and measured ozone, bromine oxide, OClO, nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, and hydrogen chloride. In situ methods yielded ozone, total water, and whole air sampling.

  • Data were collected from the 1st of November 2006 to the 31st of October 2010 by the HALO photonics Doppler lidar at Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire. The dataset contains measurements attenuated backscatter coefficients of aerosols within the atmosphere, as well as the radial and Doppler velocity of these particles. Plots of the attenuated backscatter coefficient at different heights, and of the Doppler velocity of particles are also available.

  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data.

  • The global radiosonde data contains meteorological values measured at intervals of approximately 2 seconds. The data are reported up to twice daily (at 0000 and 1200 UTC). The data is collected by worldwide observation stations and transmitted within TEMP and PILOT messages. The dataset contains measurements of pressure, temperature, and wind speed and direction.

  • The Cambridge Chemical Assimilation Data was produced as part of the Assimilation of Remote-sensed Data for Applications in the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences (ARDAAOS) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) thematic programme. It presents Chemical assimilation data from multiple sources, which is processed into a common file format making it easy to compare data from the various field campaigns and satellite missions.

  • The GBS (Global Broadcast Service) dataset is a series of radio attenuation measurements made at three sites in the UK: Chilbolton and Sparsholt, both in southern UK, and Dundee in Scotland. The aim of the experiment was to make long term measurements of the signal strength received from a 20.7GHz beacon on the US Department of Defense satellite UFO-9 at multiple sites, in order to determine whether the use of site diversity as a fade mitigation technique would be effective. The dataset spans a period of 3 years, from August 2003 to August 2006 with signal attenuation sampled once per second. This dataset is cited in: S. A. Callaghan, J. Waight, J.L.Agnew, C. J. Walden, C.L.Wrench , S. Ventouras “The GBS dataset: measurements of satellite site diversity at 20.7 GHz in the UK”, Geoscience Data Journal, 17 March 2013, DOI: 10.1002/gdj3.2

  • The GBS (Global Broadcast Service) dataset is a series of radio attenuation measurements made at three sites in the UK: Chilbolton and Sparsholt, both in southern UK, and Dundee in Scotland. The aim of the experiment was to make long term measurements of the signal strength received from a 20.7GHz beacon on the US Department of Defense satellite UFO-9 at multiple sites, in order to determine whether the use of site diversity as a fade mitigation technique would be effective. The dataset spans a period of 3 years, from August 2003 to August 2006 with signal attenuation sampled once per second. This dataset is cited in: S. A. Callaghan, J. Waight, J.L.Agnew, C. J. Walden, C.L.Wrench , S. Ventouras “The GBS dataset: measurements of satellite site diversity at 20.7 GHz in the UK”, Geoscience Data Journal, 17 March 2013, DOI: 10.1002/gdj3.2

  • The GBS (Global Broadcast Service) dataset is a series of radio attenuation measurements made at three sites in the UK: Chilbolton and Sparsholt, both in southern UK, and Dundee in Scotland. The aim of the experiment was to make long term measurements of the signal strength received from a 20.7GHz beacon on the US Department of Defense satellite UFO-9 at multiple sites, in order to determine whether the use of site diversity as a fade mitigation technique would be effective. The dataset spans a period of 3 years, from August 2003 to August 2006 with signal attenuation sampled once per second. This dataset is cited in: S. A. Callaghan, J. Waight, J.L.Agnew, C. J. Walden, C.L.Wrench , S. Ventouras “The GBS dataset: measurements of satellite site diversity at 20.7 GHz in the UK”, Geoscience Data Journal, 17 March 2013, DOI: 10.1002/gdj3.2

  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data.