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  • This dataset contains records of the BGS analytical chemistry laboratories prior to the year 2000. It is basically an archive of original records and includes card indexes, files and raw analytical data. Files may contain background detail on the samples themselves but coverage is variable; information has been collected over many years in different formats. Different analytical techniques have been used over the years; consequently data are of variable quality as systems have improved with time. Samples analysed could be from anywhere in the world and were usually analysed for internal BGS customers. These are paper records and are available for viewing or copying. Any constraints on data usage would be dependant on individual files. Anyone wishing to access the records would require assistance from staff familiar with the data.

  • This dataset of paper records holds details of analysis of all the sample batches (from both internal and external customers) analysed by the Analytical Geochemistry Laboratory of the BGS since June 1996. It was installed to underpin the UKAS (United Kingdom Accreditation Service) accreditation of the geochemistry laboratories at Keyworth, which was awarded in August 1999. There is a file for each batch of samples submitted for analysis. The file documents the progress of the samples through the laboratories, including sample registration, sample processing, raw data from analytical instruments and the data reported to the client. The records are archived to provide supporting evidence for any query regarding geochemical data provided by the laboratories.

  • Chemical analysis of stream, river and rainfall samples for lowland rivers in the UK. The data are uncensored and provide a basis for research purposes, and must be viewed in this light. Information on analytical methodologies is available, including detection limits, from which the user can choose how the data might be interpreted. The basins studied were the Tweed, Wear, Humber, Great Ouse and Thames. One tributary (the Teviot) and two main-stem sites were monitored in the Tweed Catchment. One site around two-thirds down the catchment of the River Wear was monitored. Humber Basin Monitoring was undertaken for all the tributaries especially near their downstream limits. The Great Ouse was monitored around half way down the catchment. The Thames catchment was monitored upstream and downstream of sewage inputs to the river, prior and post effluent stripping of phosphorus. This work formed part of a major UK initiative introduced in the early 1990s, the Land Ocean Interaction Study, LOIS, to examine water, chemical and sediment fluxes from the eastern UK rivers to the North Sea. The entire LOIS core monitoring data, including a wider range of determinands, is available from EIDC. As part of this and subsequent work, the initiative was extended to examine a range of catchment basins, from rural to agricultural and industrial/urban impacted ones.

  • Water quality data produced from rainfall, throughfall and stemflow samples collected within a beech stand at Black Wood in Hampshire, and an ash stand at Old Pond Close in Northamptonshire. Two studies were carried out in the early 1990s to examine water quality in relation to hydrological and pollution changes. Chemical analysis involved a combination of electrometric (pH), inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (most major, minor and trace elements), atomic absorption spectroscopy (potassium), ion chromatography (major anions and fluorine) and colourimetry (ammonium and silicon).

  • This dataset provides the results of a water quality survey undertaken in mid-May 1985 of streams, springs and boreholes associated with the ophiolite rocks of the Troodos Massif in Cyprus. Determinands measured include: Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, Sulphide, Si, Alk, pH, Al, Ba, B, Br, Cr, I, Li, Sr, Fe

  • Trace metal mobilisation data (pH, ALK, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Li, SO4, Si, Be, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Al,Sr, Be, Ba, Y,Co, Ni, B, Rb, Y, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, U) for the River Carnon, the River Fal (downstream) and its estuary in Cornwall following discharge of highly polluted water from the Wheal Jane mine. In January 1992, there was a major pollution incident involving highly acidic wastes. CEH, in conjunction with the University of Reading monitored the River Carnon between September 1992 and April 1994, to examine the water quality.