Keyword

Antarctica

128 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 128
  • This dataset contains carbon dioxide concentration measurements from the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station in Antarctica. The Picarro G2301 analyser was used for the measurement of carbon dioxide and located at the Clean Air Sector Laboratory (CASLab). Data times were averaged from the 1 minute data to provide hourly data sets. The UK participation of Southern OceaN optimal Approach To Assess the carbon state, variability and climatic drivers (SONATA) was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/P021360/1).

  • This dataset contains methane concentration measurements from the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station in Antarctica. The Picarro G2301 analyser was used for the measurement of Methane and located at the Clean Air Sector Laboratory (CASLab). Data times were averaged from the 1 minute data to provide hourly data sets. The UK participation of the Methane Observations and Yearly Assessments (MOYA) project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/N015584/1)

  • A British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter and survey team acquired 8,300 line-km of aerogeophysics data during the Austral summer of 1998/99. Gravity and radio-echo data were acquired simultaneously with the magnetic data at a compromise constant barometric height of 2,200 m, which provides a terrain clearance of 100 m over the highest peaks. Two separate surveys were conducted; one at 5 km line spacing (tie lines at 20 km) over and stretching beyond the southern extent of the Forrestal range (main survey), and one at 2 km line spacing (tie lines at 8 km) covering the Dufek Massif (detailed survey). Ashtech Z12 dual frequency GPS receivers were used for survey navigation. Pseudorange data were supplied to a Picodas PNAV navigation interface computer, which was used to guide the pilot along the pre-planned survey lines. The actual flight path was recovered, using carrier-phase, continuous, kinematic GPS processing techniques. All pseudorange navigation data were recorded at 1 Hz on a Picodas PDAS 1000, PC-based data acquisition system. We present here the processed line aerogravity data collected using Lacoste and Romberg air-sea gravity meter S83. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • The survey collected a total of 11,500 km of data along 22 lines, spaced 12 km apart and oriented perpendicular to the strike of both the Bouguer anomaly field, as derived from land data (McGibbon and Smith, 1991), and the major sub-ice topographical features (Doake et al., 1983). The speed of the aircraft was set to produce a sample spacing of about 60 m and the data were collected at heights between 1600 and 2000 m above sea level. The gravity signal was recorded using a LaCoste and Romberg air/sea gravimeter, S-83, which has been kindly loaned to BAS by the Hydrographic Office of the Royal Navy. The meter was modified by the ZLS company for use in an aircraft. The equipment was deployed in a BAS De-Havilland Twin Otter aircraft. Differential, dual frequency, carrier phase, GPS measurements of the aircraft''s motion were made using Trimble and Ashtech geodetic receivers and antennas. Ice thickness data were obtained using a BAS-built, radio echo sounding system (Corr and Popple, 1994). Ice-bottom returns over most of the survey area were obtained at a sample spacing of approximately 28 m. GPS measurements were tied into base stations in International Terrain Reference Frame network (Dietrich et al., 1998) and gravity measurements to base stations in the IGSN71 net (Jones and Ferris, 1999). We present here the processed line aerogravity data collected using Lacoste and Romberg air-sea gravity meter S83. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • Shapefile map of exposed rock outcrops for the Antarctic continent. The map was produced via a new fully automated methodology for differentiating rock from snow, clouds and sea using Landsat 8 multispectral imagery. Data was merged with the existing Antarctic Digital Database rock outcrop dataset for areas for those areas where Landsat 8 tiles were unavailable (south of 82 deg 40 S).

  • This data set contains aerogravity data collected during the WISE/ISODYN project. This collaborative UK/Italian project collected ~ 61000 line km of new aerogeophysical data during the 2005/2006 austral summer, over the previously poorly surveyed Wilkes subglacial basin, Dome C, George V Land and Northern Victoria Land. We present here the processed line aerogravity data collected using a LaCoste & Romberg air-sea gravity meter S83 mounted in the BAS aerogeophysically equipped Twin Otter aircraft. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • This dataset contains grounding line locations (GLL) for key glaciers in Antarctica, produced as part of the ESA Antarctic Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative (Antarctic_Ice_Sheet_cci) project. The data have been derived from satellite observations from the ERS-1/2, TerraSAR-X and Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites, acquired between 1994 and 2020.

  • Grounding line locations (GLL) data for the Ferringo, Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, Kohler and Pope Glaciers in Antarctica, produced by the ESA Antarctic Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project. The grounding lines have been derived from satellite observations from the ERS-1/2 and Copernicus Sentinel-1 instruments, acquired in the period from 1995-2017.

  • This dataset constists of an ice velocity time series for Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica, derived from Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite data acquired from 2014 to 2016. It has been produced by the ESA Antarctic Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project. The data format is 3-layer GeoTiff: the first two layers represent the horizontal displacement component easting and northing respectively in output map coordinates and converted to meters per day [m/d]. The third layer represents the vertical velocity and is derived from the height difference along the displacement vector taken from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The method employed to produce this dataset was presented in: Nagler, T., Rott, H., Hetzenecker, M., Wuite, J., Potin, P. (2015). The Sentinel-1 Mission: New Opportunities for Ice Sheet Observations. Remote Sensing, 2015, 7, 9371-9389, doi:10.3390/rs70709371.

  • Grounding line locations (GLL) data for the Ferringo, Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, Kohler and Pope Glaciers in Antarctica, produced by the ESA Antarctic Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project. The grounding lines have been derived from satellite observations from the ERS-1/2 and Copernicus Sentinel-1 instruments, acquired in the period from 1995-2017. An extended dataset of Grounding line locations for these Glaciers is available on the ENVEO CryoPortal (http://cryoportal.enveo.at/data/)