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  • Eight Antarctic Fur seal rookeries near King Edward Point on South Georgia have been monitored since 2008. The colonies (Burnet1, Burnet2, Burnet2, Little, Poa1, Poa2, Poa3 and Tortula) are surveyed frequently between November and January. The number of males, females, pups and juveniles are recorded. Data is also summarised as max count per season for males, females pups and juveniles, and first pup date. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Counts of Antarctic fur seal individuals encountered daily at the Special Study Beach (SSB) at Bird Island, South Georgia. The SSB demographic study started in 1982 and has continued with consistent data collection methods to date. Daily values include total counts of territorial males, new females, all females present in the afternoon, new pups born, and number of dead pups. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • The number of Fur and Elephant seals around the base on Signy Island have been counted daily between January and March since 1992. Details of the area counted are given in the 1992 Seal Mammal report (AD6/2H/1992/NM3).

  • Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) diet has been monitored at the King Edward Point research station on South Georgia since 2008. Scats are collected regularly and krill carapaces, fish otoliths and squid beaks extracted. Krill length is calculated from the extracted carapaces whilst squid beaks and fish otoliths are measured and identified to species where possible. This dataset comprises raw and processed krill length as well as squid beak and otolith measurements and identification to species where appropriate.

  • Since 2009, the weights of male and female Antarctic Fur Seal pups from the Maiviken area on South Georgia have been monitored. 100 pups are randomly sampled from two areas, tussock and beach, at the start of January, February and March. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Fur Seal (Arctocephalus gazella) diet has been monitored at Bird Island since 1989. Scats are collected regularly and krill carapaces, fish otoliths and squid beaks extracted. Krill length is calculated from the extracted carapaces whilst squid beaks and fish otoliths are measured and identified to species where possible. This dataset comprises raw and processed krill length as well as squid beak and otolith measurements and identification to species where appropriate.

  • Incidences of Antarctic Fur Seals entangled in man-made debris have been recorded since 2008 at Grytviken, South Georgia. The majority of entanglements have been Antarctic Fur Seals caught in plastic packaging bands, synthetic line and fishing nets. Where possible these are removed by scientists working at the research base. This data is collected as part of CCAMLR''s Marine Debris Programme.

  • The weight of Antarctic fur seal pups at Main Bay on Bird Island have been measured since 1973. 50 pups on the beach and 50 pups in the Tussac grass at the back of the beach are sexed and weighed in January, February and March each year. This work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council (UK) core funding to the British Antarctic Survey.

  • Platform Transmitting Terminal (PTT) tags were used to track Antarctic Fur Seals (Arctocephalus gazella) from Bird Island, South Georgia, 1995-2010. PTT tags use the ARGOS satellite system to collect geospatial data. Tags were deployed on breeding females during the summer, to provide information on where the seals are foraging during lactation and into the winter months.

  • Platform Transmitting Terminal (PTT) tags have been used to track Antarctic Fur seals, (Arctocephalus gazella) from South Georgia, since 1998. PTT tags use the ARGOS satellite system to collect geospatial data. These tags are deployed on a project-by-project basis and so data are not available for every year. Tags are generally deployed during the summer season.