From 1 - 3 / 3
  • The dataset provides qualitative data from anonymised in-depth interviews conducted in 2017 with domestic poultry owners, commercial poultry farm workers and market sellers of live poultry in Bangladesh. The dataset comprises interview transcripts in Bangla. Household and farm interviews were carried out in rural areas of Mirzapur sub-district, Tangail. Interviews with market sellers of poultry were carried out in Dhaka city. An interview guide was used to explore themes and topics relating to poultry-raising practices, hygiene and waste disposal practices relating to poultry and use of antibiotics in poultry. The objective was to understand human behaviours and practices that may contribute to environmental contamination with antibiotic-resistant bacteria from poultry and potential pathways of transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from poultry to humans. The research was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative, award NE/N019555/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/630759ac-b0ca-4561-8eec-414b47e14829

  • A cross-sectional, interviewer-administered survey was conducted in 2017 in rural households, poultry farms and urban food markets. Survey data for each setting comprise three datafiles. The rural households and poultry farms (broiler chickens) were located in Mirzapur, Tangail district; urban food markets were located in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. In each setting, the survey included participants that had high exposure to poultry, and a comparison group that had lower exposure to poultry. The aim of the survey was to assess potential sources of exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly commensal bacteria that colonise the gastrointestinal tract of humans and poultry. The survey also assessed the use of antibiotics for human participants and practices relating to their poultry such as type of feed, housing, use of antibiotics for poultry and hygiene practices before and after being in contact with poultry. The survey was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative, award NE/N019555/1. Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b4a90182-8b9c-4da8-8b95-bcd5acc727d1

  • The database includes the classification of 966 active nitrogen-relevant policies from South Asia (including Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka). The collection during 2020 and 2021 focuses on national level policies; some subnational policies were also collected. Data collection involved building on an existing open access global database developed by Kanter et al., 2020 that contained 51 policies for South Asia established to 2017 sourced by the environmental law ECOLEX database. Further policies were collected mostly from online sources: such as international policy databases: FAOLEX and national government and ministry websites. A protocol for policy collection and classification was established and followed to ensure consistent and thorough collections across the eight countries. Policies were classified according to a variety of parameters including the sink (air, water etc.) and sector (agriculture, industry etc.) they address and by type of policy. Policies were clustered if they had a central node policy in place and if a ‘subordinate policy’ (including amendments) did not offer anything new in terms of content related to Nitrogen management. This data was collected as part of a collective partnership that brings together leading organisations from across South Asia and the UK to reduce the adverse global impacts of nitrogen pollution on the environment, health, and wellbeing. More specifically providing a resource for both SANH partners and the wider scientific and policy community to understand the nitrogen policy landscape in the south Asian region. Furthermore, this research contributes to efforts in building a nitrogen policy arena promoting sustainable management of nitrogen, mitigating adverse effects. The dataset provides a thorough overview of available nitrogen related policies in South Asia but does not provide a complete set of all the nitrogen relevant policies available in each country. In some cases, this was due to our dependency on policy availability online, and some websites were not maintained. In addition, we excluded policies established post 2020 to avoid policy responses to COVID19 and to align more closely with the original global study. Repealed policies were omitted from the database. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e2f248d5-79a1-4af9-bdd4-f739fb12ce9a