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  • Estimated species richness data for valuation of biodiversity across the UK, based on species occurrence records for 11 taxonomic groups (Bees, Birds, Bryophytes, Butterflies, Carabidae, Hoverflies, Isopoda, Ladybirds, Moths, Orthoptera and Vascular plants). UK species occurrence data were collated from the Biological Records Centre (BRC) and the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO). Estimated species richness was calculated across all taxonomic groups for two time periods: 1970-1990 and 2000-2013. The dataset was used to create the "UK ecological status map version 2". Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6c535793-034d-4c4f-8a00-497315e7d689

  • A spatial indicator of ecological status for valuation of biodiversity across the UK, based on species occurrence records for eleven taxonomic groups (Bees, Birds, Bryophytes, Butterflies, Carabidae, Hoverflies, Isopoda, Ladybirds, Moths, Orthoptera and Vascular plants) was developed. UK species occurrence data were collated from the Biological Records Centre (BRC). The mean ecological status was calculated across all taxonomic groups for the 2000 to 2013 time period, relative to the species richness maximums from the 1970-1990 time period. This version supersedes the dataset "UK ecological status map". Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/58b248a8-6e34-4ffb-ae32-3744566399a2

  • This data set consists of the tabulated results of bird surveys on Peak District farms and moorlands. Bird abundance and distribution on Peak District farms and moorlands, 2007-2008 The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. The project used the Peak District National Park as a case study to examine the impact of hill farming practices on upland biodiversity (using birds as an indicator group); how hill farms were responding to ongoing and future changes to policies and prices; what this would in turn imply for upland biodiversity; what the public wanted from upland ecosystems and how policies could be designed better to deliver public goods from hill farms. To answer these questions, the project team conducted ecological and economic surveys on hill farms; used survey results to parameterise ecological and economic models of this farming system; developed new ways to integrate these into coupled ecological and economic models and paid particular attention to interactions across farm boundaries; used the models to evaluate the performance of existing policies and to test designs that could lead to more effective policies; and conducted a range of choice experiments with different cross-sections of the general public to evaluate their preferences for upland landscapes. Choice experiment, socio-economic survey and model data from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6363 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • Data comprise a catalogue of motion activated digital trap camera images obtained from cameras located in the Red Forest, Chornobyl (Ukraine) over a period of a year (September 2016 - September 2017); images are included. In total 45,859 images were captured; of these 19,393 contained identifiable species or organism types, 565 recorded people, 349 were of species that could not be determined and 25,552 images recorded nothing. In addition there were 687 images of members of the research team setting up and servicing the cameras. All images, with the exception of those that recorded people or camera setup/service, are included as part of the dataset. Site characteristics and descriptions for each camera location are provided (e.g. site location, estimates of ambient dose rate, activity concentration of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in soil, Cs-137 and Sr-90 deposition, extent of fire damage, vegetation and forest cover and density and water proximity). The same person recorded all descriptive parameters. Information related to each cameras deployment is also provided; this includes camera deployment periods, number of days deployed and a summary of the images (e.g. number of images with mammals, birds or insects in, number of images with nothing in, number of images with people in) and the total number of triggering events recorded. Also provided are indicative weighted absorbed dose rates estimated using the ERICA Tool v2.0 https://erica-tool.com/ for a ‘large mammal’ and ‘red fox’. Species definitively captured on the motion activated digital trap cameras were:Brown hare, Eurasian elk, Eurasian lynx, European badger, Domesticated dog (feral), Grey wolf, Przewalski's horse, Raccoon dog, Red deer, Red fox, Red squirrel, Roe deer, Wild boar, Black grouse, Common blackbird, Common buzzard, Common wood pigeon, Eurasian bittern, Eurasian hoopoe, Eurasian Jay, Eurasian sparrowhawk, Eurasian woodcock, European nightjar, European robin, Fieldfare, Great egret, Great grey shrike, Great spotted woodpecker, Great tit, Hazel grouse, Mistle thrush, Red backed shrike and Song thrush. Others identified to genus level include:Marten sp., Finch sp., Shrike sp., Thrush sp. There were also some mammal and bird species which were unidentifiable. Site descriptions, camera information, a summary of the contents of the image catalogue, summaries of mammals and birds by setup, site and camera and all the trap camera images have been provided as part of this dataset. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/bf82cec2-5f8a-407c-bf74-f8689ca35e83