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  • This dataset contains information on the Bacterial Amplicon Sequence Variant (ASV) abundance from peat soil sampled following a wildfire on the Stalybridge estate (UK) in June 2020. Samples were taken in 10 established plots at three time periods following the fire: approximately 3 months, 10 months and 12 months post-fire. This was taken at two depths: 0 – 5cm from the surface (top) and 5 – 10 cm from the surface (bottom). The 10 plots were divided into two groups of five, one that was observed to have suffered a light burn (termed shallow burn) and one that received a more severe burn (termed deep burn). Five additional plots were sampled at the same time as the 3-month samples from a neighbouring unburned site (termed control plots). Samples where no ASVs were observed were removed from the dataset. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/01ced3c2-17c6-4512-b73b-e065afed7bad

  • Antibiotic susceptibility tests are presented as the zone of inhibition using the disc-diffusion method, and categorized as resistant, intermediate or susceptible. DNA samples from antibiotic-resistant bacteria were analysed for the presence or absence of resistance genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Laboratory analyses were conducted by trained staff at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b). The aim of the study was to identify the antibiotic-susceptibility profiles and resistance genes of bacteria (Escherichia coli) obtained from humans, poultry and the environment. Bacterial isolates previously identified with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins or carbapenems were included in the analysis. Bacterial samples originated from rural households and poultry farms (broiler chickens) in Mirzapur, Tangail district; and urban food markets in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Environmental samples included surface water, water supply, wastewater, soil, animal faeces (poultry and cattle) and solid waste. The survey was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative award NE/N019555/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dda6dd55-f955-4dd5-bc03-b07cc8548a3d

  • The dataset includes information on antibiotic-resistance and resistance genes in bacteria (Escherichia coli) from humans, poultry and the environment in rural households, poultry farms and urban food markets. The rural households and poultry farms (broiler chickens) were located in Mirzapur, Tangail district; and urban food markets were located in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Environmental samples were collected from surface water, water supply, wastewater, soil, animal faeces (poultry and cattle) and solid waste between February 2017 and October 2018 . DNA samples from antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in all samples were analysed for quantitative assessment of two resistance genes. Trained staff from the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) undertook sample collection and laboratory analysis. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and associated genes among humans, poultry and environmental compartments in Bangladesh. The survey was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative award NE/N019555/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0239cdaf-deab-4151-8f68-715063eaea45

  • This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. The data is archived in European Nucleotide Archive under primary accession reference PRJEB33721. This dataset is the DNA sequences from Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial 16S and fungal ITS2 genes in climate manipulated soils from the Climoor field experiment. Soil samples were collected in 2003 and 2017 after 4 and 18 years of manipulation, respectively. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots, three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours, and three plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plants' growing season (March to September). The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes and has been running since 1999. The microbial community data aims to understand how changes in soil hydrological and chemical properties have influenced the soil microbial composition and the implications of this for biogeochemical cycling. The data were collected as part of NERC project NEC05670 CWI-STU Fiona Seaton as part of the NERC Soils Training And Research Studentships Centre for Doctoral Training (STARS)

  • This set of data describes resilience in microbial communities in samples taken at the Sourhope experimental site in 2001 by the Scottish Crop Research Institute, the University of Aberdeen and Cranfield University. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT8545019630). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7af2f732-f8a5-4a87-bcc0-dae54323efd0

  • Soil fungi communities from three Antarctic islands were characterised using DNA sequencing. Between October and November 2011, soil samples were collected from Bird Island, Signy Island and Leonie Island in the sub-Antarctic, low maritime and high maritime Antarctic respectively. Soil was collected under populations of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl. and Deschampsia antarctica Desv., the only two native vascular plant species that occur in Antarctica. Total DNA was extracted from the soils and fungal specific primers used to amplify the ribosomal ITS region for subsequent 454 pyrosequencing. Sequences are deposited in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (study accession SRP068654). Funding was provided by the NERC grants NE/H014098/1, NE/H014772/1 and NE/H01408X/1.