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EARTH SCIENCE > Cryosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets > Glacier Elevation/Ice Sheet Elevation

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  • A digital elevation model of the bed of Rutford Ice Stream, Antarctica, derived from radio-echo sounding data. The data cover an 18 x 40 km area immediately upstream of the grounding line of the ice stream. This area is of particular interest because repeated seismic surveys have shown that rapid erosion and deposition of subglacial sediments has taken place. The bed topography shows a range of different subglacial landforms including mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlins and hummocks. This dataset will form a baseline survey which, when compared to future surveys, should reveal how active subglacial landscapes change over time. The dataset comprises observed ice thickness data, an interpolated bed elevation grid, observed surface elevation data and a surface elevation grid.

  • A time series of the mean surface elevation along a transect across Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier from Feb 2012 to May 2018. Funding: Data were processed under NERC project CALISMO NE/P011365/1. Data were acquired under NERC project NE/I007148/1. Data were supplied by DLR.

  • This dataset contains glacier boundaries from 1975 to 2020 and elevation change data from 2000 to 2020 over the Cordilleras Vilcanota, Vilcabamba, and Urubamba, Peru. Glacier boundary data were analysed in Google Earth Engine from the Landsat archive and quantifies rate of change in ice extent over recent decades. Elevation change data were analysed in Google Earth Engine from the ASTER archive and quantifies change in ice thickness over decadal intervals from 2000 to 2020. Data are available as shapefiles (.shp) and GeoTIFFs (.tif). Summary data are available as CSVs (.csv). This work was funded by NERC SPHERES Doctoral Training Partnership (NE/L002574/1) and NERC Newton Fund (PEGASUS) (NE/S013318/1).

  • Input and results files for the ice dynamics model Ua simulating potential past and future ice geometry of Cook Glacier, East Antarctica. Results seek to explain potential causes of recent observed acceleration and speculate on future causes of acceleration. This work was funded by NERC grant NE/R000719/1.

  • Improved Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Antarctic Ice Sheet derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems-Reflectometry (GNSS-R). This builds on a previous study (Cartwright et al., 2018) using GNSS-R to derive an Antarctic DEM but uses improved processing and an additional 13 months of measurements. A median bias of under 10 m and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of under 53 m are obtained, as compared to existing DEMs. Funding was provided by NERC grant NE/L002531/1.

  • Global monthly outputs of orography, surface air temperature and water stable isotopes (d18O) were run by the isotope-enabled atmosphere/ocean coupled model HadCM3 for the last interglacial (128 ka). An ensemble of ten idealised Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) simulations were processed, included a pre-industrial and a last interglacial control simulations. The eight other simulations used changed topography of the AIS relative to Dome C to ensure the preservation of the atmospheric pathways. The simulations were run 100 years and the last 50 years were used for the analyses. This work was funding through the European Research Council under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 742224, WACSWAIN) and NERC grant NE/P009271/1.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the BBAS science programme funded by the British Antarctic Survey over the Pine Island Glacier system during the austral summer of 2004/05. This survey was a collaborative US/UK field campaign which undertook a systematic geophysical survey of the entire Amundsen Sea embayment using comparable airborne survey systems mounted in Twin Otter aircraft. Operating from a temporary field camp (PNE, S 77deg34'' W 095deg56''), we collected ~35,000 km of airborne survey data. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, gravity meter, and the first version of a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN) used for the first time to support this survey. We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • This dataset contains bed and surface elevation picks derived from airborne radar collected in 2015/16 over Foundation Ice Stream and Filchner Ice Shelf as part of the 5-year Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project funded by NERC (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) and awarded to the British Antarctic Survey with contribution from the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute. The aim of this project was to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. This collaborative initiative collected ~7,000 line-km of new aerogeophysical data using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter.

  • Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica. A time series of 156 profiles of ice surface elevation along a flowline based on the mean flow direction. The flowline passes through a region of large elevation change that took place between 2014 and 2017. The work was funded by NERC projects NE/P011365/1 and NE/S006605/1.

  • Improved Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems-Reflectometry (GNSS-R). This builds on a previous study (Cartwright et al., 2018) using GNSS-R to derive an Antarctic DEM but uses improved processing and an additional 13 months of measurements. A median bias of under 10 m and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of under 166 m are obtained, as compared to existing DEMs. Funding was provided by NERC grant NE/L002531/1.