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EARTH SCIENCE > Cryosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets > Glacier Topography/Ice Sheet Topography

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  • The dataset presented here contains a csv-file including the coordinates, received power of the bed reflection and the two-way travel time of the bed reflection. The X and Y coordinates are projected in EPSG:3031 - WGS 84 / Antarctic Polar Stereographic coordinate system. Data presented here have been frequency filtered and 2D migrated (using a finite difference approach and migration velocity of 0.168 m ns-1), followed by the picking of the bed reflection using ReflexW software (Sandmeier Scientific Software). The received power is calculated within a 280 ns time window centred on, and encompassing, the bed reflection (Gades et al., 2000). This work was funded within the BEAMISH project by NERC AFI award numbers NE/G014159/1 and NE/G013187/1.

  • Polarimetric phase-sensitive radar measurements were collected at the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide on the 25th and 26th December 2019. The measurements were conducted at 10 sites along a 6 km-long transect ~5-10 km northeast of the location of the WAIS Divide Deep Ice Core. At each site, a suite of four quadrature (quad-) polarimetric measurements were collected using an autonomous phase-sensitive radio echo sounder (ApRES) in a single-input single-output (SISO) configuration. The study is part of the Thwaites Interdisciplinary Margin Evolution (TIME) project of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration (ITGC), and is a collaboration between the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) and the United Kingdom Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). It was funded by UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) research grant NE/S006788/1 and USA National Science Foundation (NSF) research grant 1739027.

  • Three separate airborne radar surveys were flown during the austral summer of 2016/17 over the Filchner Ice Shelf and Halley Ice Shelf (West Antarctica), and over the outlet glacier flows of the English Coast (western Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula) during the Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project. This project was a NERC-funded (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) collaborative initiative between the British Antarctic Survey, the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. The 2016/17 aerogeophysics surveys acquired a total of ~26,000 line km of aerogeophysical data. The FISS survey consisted of 17 survey flights totalling ~16,000 km of radar data over the Support Force, Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams of the Filchner Ice Shelf. The Halley Ice Shelf survey consisted of ~4,600 km spread over 5 flights and covering the area around the BAS Halley 6 station and the Brunt Ice Shelf. The English Coast survey consisted of ~5,000 km spread over 7 flights departing from the Sky Blu basecamp and linking several outlet glacier flows and the grounding line of the western Palmer Land, including the ENVISAT, CRYOSAT, GRACE, Landsat, Sentinel, ERS, Hall, Nikitin and Lidke ice streams. Our Twin Otter aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, an iMAR strapdown gravity system, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN-2). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown during the austral summer of 2015/16 over the Foundation Ice Stream, Bungenstock Ice Rise, and the Filchner ice shelf as part of the 5-year Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project. This project was a NERC-funded (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) collaborative initiative between the British Antarctic Survey, the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. The 2015/16 aerogeophysics survey acquired ~7,000 line km of aerogeophysical data with a particular focus on the Foundation Ice Stream. Our Twin Otter aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN-2). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • This dataset contains bed and surface elevation picks derived from airborne radar collected during the POLARGAP 2015/16 project funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and with in-kind contribution from the British Antarctic Survey, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF). This collaborative project collected ~38,000 line-km of new aerogeophysical data using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter. The primary objective of the POLARGAP campaign was to carry out an airborne gravity survey covering the southern polar gap beyond the coverage of the GOCE orbit. This dataset covers the South Pole as well as parts of the Support Force, Foundation and Recovery Glaciers. The bed pick data acquired during the POLARGAP survey over the Recovery Lakes is archived at NPI: https://doi.org/10.21334/npolar.2019.ae99f750.

  • This gridded dataset provides geometry (ice thickness and bedrock topography) covering the Pine Island Glacier catchment. It has been created using the principle of mass conservation, given observed fields of velocity, surface elevation change and surface mass balance, together with sparse ice thickness data measured along airborne radar flight-lines. Previous ice flow modelling studies show that gridded geometry products that use traditional interpolation techniques (e.g. Bedmap2) can result in a spurious thickening tendency near the grounding line of Pine Island Glacier. Removing the cause of this thickening signal, in order to more accurately model ice flow dynamics, has been the motivation for creating a new geometry that is consistent with the conservation of mass. This data was funded by a PhD project within the iSTAR-C programme (with NERC grant reference NE/J005738/1).

  • This dataset contains bed, surface elevation and ice thickness measurements from the Recovery/Slessor/Bailey Region, East Antarctica. Radar data was collected using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter during the ICEGRAV-2013 airborne geophysics campaign (Forsberg et al., 2018). Data is identified by flight and are available in both Geosoft database (.gdb) and ASCII file formats (.xyz).

  • Survey flying (using Basler BT-67 aircraft C-GJKB) was carried out between 1 May 2014 and 12 May 2014 to measure the ice thickness, surface elevation and magnetic anomaly of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Nunavut, Canada. The primary radar instrument was the UTIG-JPL High-Capability Radar Sounder (HICARS: Peters et al., 2005). Level 1 radar data products are hosted at NSIDC. Surface elevation data was acquired by a fixed beam Riegl laser altimeter using a solid-state infrared lasar firing at 100 Hz. A tail boom-mounted cesium vapor total field magnetometer specially configured for the aircraft measured the magnetic anomaly. Funding was provided by NERC grants NE/K004999/1, NE/K004956/1 and NE/K004956/2.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the BBAS science programme funded by the British Antarctic Survey over the Pine Island Glacier system during the austral summer of 2004/05. This survey was a collaborative US/UK field campaign which undertook a systematic geophysical survey of the entire Amundsen Sea embayment using comparable airborne survey systems mounted in Twin Otter aircraft. Operating from a temporary field camp (PNE, S 77deg34'' W 095deg56''), we collected ~35,000 km of airborne survey data. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, gravity meter, and the first version of a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN) used for the first time to support this survey. We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • Radio-echo sounding data was collected using 150 MHz ice-penetrating radars with bandwidths of 15-20 MHz. This data was collected as part of the seven nation Antarctica''s Gamburtsev Province (AGAP) expedition during the International Polar Year 2007-2009, and used to acquire a detailed image of the ice sheet bed deep in the interior of East Antarctica. Airborne geophysical methods were used to understand the fundamental structure shrouded beneath Dome A. Two twin Otter aircraft - one BAS, one United States Antarctic Program (USAP) - equipped with ice-sounding radars, laser ranging systems, gravity meters and magnetomemeters, operated from camps located on either side of Dome A.