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  • The dataset presented here contains a csv-file including the coordinates, received power of the bed reflection and the two-way travel time of the bed reflection. The X and Y coordinates are projected in EPSG:3031 - WGS 84 / Antarctic Polar Stereographic coordinate system. Data presented here have been frequency filtered and 2D migrated (using a finite difference approach and migration velocity of 0.168 m ns-1), followed by the picking of the bed reflection using ReflexW software (Sandmeier Scientific Software). The received power is calculated within a 280 ns time window centred on, and encompassing, the bed reflection (Gades et al., 2000). This work was funded within the BEAMISH project by NERC AFI award numbers NE/G014159/1 and NE/G013187/1.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the seven nation Antarctica''s Gamburtsev Province (AGAP) expedition over the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, Dome A, and the interior of East Antarctica during the International Polar Year 2007-2009. Operating from field camps located on either side of Dome A (namely AGAP-N and AGAP-S), we collected ~120,000 km (equivalent to 180,000 km2) of airborne survey data using two Twin Otter aircrafts - one from BAS and one from the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). The aircrafts were equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, laser ranging systems, magnetometers, gravity meters, and ice-sounding radars. We present here the full radar dataset from the BAS PASIN radar system consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • Global monthly outputs of orography, surface air temperature and water stable isotopes (d18O) were run by the isotope-enabled atmosphere/ocean coupled model HadCM3 for the last interglacial (128 ka). An ensemble of ten idealised Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) simulations were processed, included a pre-industrial and a last interglacial control simulations. The eight other simulations used changed topography of the AIS relative to Dome C to ensure the preservation of the atmospheric pathways. The simulations were run 100 years and the last 50 years were used for the analyses. This work was funding through the European Research Council under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 742224, WACSWAIN) and NERC grant NE/P009271/1.

  • This dataset consists of a bed DEM and four velocity maps of Kongsvegen, a surge-type glacier in Svalbard. The bed DEM was generated from ground-penetrating radar surveys in spring 2016 and 2018, and the velocity maps span the period Dec 2017 to Feb 2019. The velocity maps show the initial speed-up of the glacier as it transitions from quiescence to surge. Data acquisition was funded by NERC Urgency Grant NE/R018243/1 REBUS (Resolving Enthalpy Budget to Understand Surges).

  • This dataset contains bed and surface elevation picks derived from airborne radar collected during the POLARGAP 2015/16 project funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and with in-kind contribution from the British Antarctic Survey, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF). This collaborative project collected ~38,000 line-km of new aerogeophysical data using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter. The primary objective of the POLARGAP campaign was to carry out an airborne gravity survey covering the southern polar gap beyond the coverage of the GOCE orbit. This dataset covers the South Pole as well as parts of the Support Force, Foundation and Recovery Glaciers. The bed pick data acquired during the POLARGAP survey over the Recovery Lakes is archived at NPI: https://doi.org/10.21334/npolar.2019.ae99f750.

  • SAR-processed two-dimensional radargram data in SEG-Y format acquired from the Institute and Moller ice streams, West Antarctica between mid-December 2010 and mid-January 2011. Data were collected using the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Polarimetric radar Airborne Science Instrument (PASIN) radar, operated at a centre frequency of 150 MHz, and installed on the BAS Twin Otter aircraft "Bravo Lima". In total, ~25,000km of aerogeophysical data were collected, with coverage extending from the ice stream grounding zone to the ice divide. A high-resolution grid, with a line-spacing of 7.5 x 25 km, was acquired over the central parts of the ice stream catchments. Data were acquired during twenty-eight survey flights (sixteen flown from remote field camp C110, ten from Patriot Hills and two "transit" flights). Funding for this data acquisition was provided by the UK NERC AFI grant NE/G013071/1. These data should be cited as follows: Siegert, Martin et al. (2017); Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) processed airborne radio-echo sounding data from the Institute and Moller ice streams, West Antarctica, 2010-11; Polar Data Centre, Natural Environment Research Council, UK; doi:10.5285/8a975b9e-f18c-4c51-9bdb-b00b82da52b8

  • This dataset contains bed and surface elevation picks derived from airborne radar collected in 2016/17 over the Filchner Ice Shelf and Halley Ice Shelf (West Antarctica) as part of the 5-year Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project funded by NERC (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) and awarded to the British Antarctic Survey with contribution from the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute. The aim of this project was to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. This collaborative initiative collected ~15,000 line-km of new aerogeophysical data using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter. The majority of flights were flown as part of FISS over the Support Force, Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams. Separate flights over Halley 6 research station and Brunt Ice Shelf were also collected as part of this season. The bed and surface elevation picks for the English Coast part of this season are available at: https://doi.org/10.5285/e07d62bf-d58c-4187-a019-59be998939cc.

  • We present steady-state ice thickness, bed elevation, and ice surface elevation output from simulations of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) on a suite of reconstructed Antarctic palaeotopographies using the DeConto and Pollard (DP16) ice sheet model. Ice surface mass balance inputs were provided using the GENESIS v3.0 global atmosphere general circulation model coupled to a 50 m slab ocean model, which provides boundary meteorology for the RegCM3 regional climate model. Three climate/ocean scenarios were simulated: (1) cold climate orbital parameters, preindustrial CO2 levels (280 ppm) and modern ocean temperatures, (2) a subsequent shift to warm climate orbital parameters, an increase in CO2 levels to 500 ppm, and a 5 deg C ocean temperature rise, and (3) as for (2), but with CO2 levels increased to 840 ppm. The steady-state simulations were performed on a suite of reconstructed Antarctic palaeotopographies pertaining to the following four time slices: (1) the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (EOB; ca. 34 Ma), (2) the Oligocene-Miocene boundary (OMB, ca. 23 Ma), (3) the mid-Miocene (MM; ca. 14 Ma), and (4) the mid-Pliocene (MP; ca. 3.5 Ma). Simulations were performed for minimum, median, and maximum end-member topographies, and equivalent simulations were run on the modern (ice-free) Antarctic bed topography for comparison. Further details are given in the accompanying publication. For more information, please contact G. Paxman. Funding was provided by NERC Ph.D. studentship NE/L002590/1.

  • During the austral summer of 2005/06 a collaborative UK/Italian field campaign collected ~61,000 line km of aerogeophysical data over the previously poorly surveyed Wilkes subglacial basin, Dome C, Transantarctic Mountains, George V Land and Northern Victoria Land using airborne survey systems mounted in a Twin Otter aircraft. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, a LaCoste and Romberg air-sea gravimeter, and an ice-sounding radar system (PASIN). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown over the Institute and Moller ice streams in the Weddell Sea sector of West Antarctica in the austral summer of 2010/11 as part of the Institute-Moller Antarctic Funding Initiative (IMAFI) project (grant reference number: NE/G013071/1). This project was a NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI) collaborative project between the British Antarctic Survey and the Universities of Edinburgh, York, Aberdeen and Exeter with the aim to test the hypothesis that the Institute and Moller ice streams are underlain by weak marine sediments which control the flow of the overlying ice. Operating from two static field camps close to the ice divide between the Institute and Moller ice streams and Patriot Hills, we collected ~25,000 km of airborne radio-echo sounding data across 28 survey lines. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, a LaCoste and Romberg air-sea gravimeter, and an ice-sounding radar system (PASIN). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.