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  • The dataset presented here contains a csv-file including the coordinates, received power of the bed reflection and the two-way travel time of the bed reflection. The X and Y coordinates are projected in EPSG:3031 - WGS 84 / Antarctic Polar Stereographic coordinate system. Data presented here have been frequency filtered and 2D migrated (using a finite difference approach and migration velocity of 0.168 m ns-1), followed by the picking of the bed reflection using ReflexW software (Sandmeier Scientific Software). The received power is calculated within a 280 ns time window centred on, and encompassing, the bed reflection (Gades et al., 2000). This work was funded within the BEAMISH project by NERC AFI award numbers NE/G014159/1 and NE/G013187/1.

  • Three separate airborne radar surveys were flown during the austral summer of 2016/17 over the Filchner Ice Shelf and Halley Ice Shelf (West Antarctica), and over the outlet glacier flows of the English Coast (western Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula) during the Filchner Ice Shelf System (FISS) project. This project was a NERC-funded (grant reference number: NE/L013770/1) collaborative initiative between the British Antarctic Survey, the National Oceanography Centre, the Met Office Hadley Centre, University College London, the University of Exeter, Oxford University, and the Alfred Wenger Institute to investigate how the Filchner Ice Shelf might respond to a warmer world, and what the impact of sea-level rise could be by the middle of this century. The 2016/17 aerogeophysics surveys acquired a total of ~26,000 line km of aerogeophysical data. The FISS survey consisted of 17 survey flights totalling ~16,000 km of radar data over the Support Force, Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams of the Filchner Ice Shelf. The Halley Ice Shelf survey consisted of ~4,600 km spread over 5 flights and covering the area around the BAS Halley 6 station and the Brunt Ice Shelf. The English Coast survey consisted of ~5,000 km spread over 7 flights departing from the Sky Blu basecamp and linking several outlet glacier flows and the grounding line of the western Palmer Land, including the ENVISAT, CRYOSAT, GRACE, Landsat, Sentinel, ERS, Hall, Nikitin and Lidke ice streams. Our Twin Otter aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, an iMAR strapdown gravity system, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN-2). We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • Improved Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems-Reflectometry (GNSS-R). This builds on a previous study (Cartwright et al., 2018) using GNSS-R to derive an Antarctic DEM but uses improved processing and an additional 13 months of measurements. A median bias of under 10 m and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of under 166 m are obtained, as compared to existing DEMs. Funding was provided by NERC grant NE/L002531/1.

  • This dataset contains bed, surface elevation and ice thickness measurements from the Recovery/Slessor/Bailey Region, East Antarctica. Radar data was collected using the 150MHz PASIN radar echo sounding system (Corr et al., 2007) deployed on a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Twin Otter during the ICEGRAV-2013 airborne geophysics campaign (Forsberg et al., 2018). Data is identified by flight and are available in both Geosoft database (.gdb) and ASCII file formats (.xyz).

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the GRADES-IMAGE project funded by BAS over the Antarctic Peninsula, Ellsworth Mountains and Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (also including the Evans Ice stream and Carson Inlet) mainly to image englacial layers and bedrock topography during the 2006/07 field season. Operating from temporary field camps at Sky Blu, Partiot Hills and out of RABID depot (Rutford Ice Stream), we collected ~27,550 km of airborne radio-echo sounding data over 100 hours of surveying. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, and an ice-sounding radar system (PASIN). Note that there was no gravimetric element to this survey. We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • This gridded dataset provides geometry (ice thickness and bedrock topography) covering the Pine Island Glacier catchment. It has been created using the principle of mass conservation, given observed fields of velocity, surface elevation change and surface mass balance, together with sparse ice thickness data measured along airborne radar flight-lines. Previous ice flow modelling studies show that gridded geometry products that use traditional interpolation techniques (e.g. Bedmap2) can result in a spurious thickening tendency near the grounding line of Pine Island Glacier. Removing the cause of this thickening signal, in order to more accurately model ice flow dynamics, has been the motivation for creating a new geometry that is consistent with the conservation of mass. This data was funded by a PhD project within the iSTAR-C programme (with NERC grant reference NE/J005738/1).

  • Meteorological variables (wind speed, air temperature and wind direction) were collected using two wind towers. Photogrammetric data were collected using a pole-mounted digital camera and DJI Phantom 3 UAV. LiDAR data collected via terrestrial and airborne laser scanning. Fieldwork carried out at Hintereisferner glacier, in the Oetztal Alps region, Tyrol, Austria, from 1-15 August 2018 by Joshua Chambers, Thomas Smith and Mark Smith. Terrestrial laser scan (TLS) data collected by Rudolf Sailer. Airborne laser scan (ALS) data originally from Open Data Austria, see Sailer et al. (2012). One wind tower recorded for the entire study duration, the second was moved to different plots every ~4 days. Photogrammetric data were collected on 8, 10, 11, 12 and 13 August. TLS scans were split into upper- and lower-glacier, and completed on 3, 7, 12 and 16 August. Data were used to examine the relations between glacier aerodynamic roughness and sampling resolution, and to develop a correction factor for roughness derived from coarser resolution data. Fieldwork was funded by an INTERACT Transnational Access grant awarded to Mark Smith under the European Union H2020 Grant Agreement No. 730938. Joshua Chambers is supported by a NERC PhD studentship (NE/L002574/1). Ivana Stiperski was funded by Austrian Science Fund (FWF) grant T781-N32. ***** PLEASE BE ADVISED TO USE VERSION 2.0 DATA ***** The VERSION 2.0 data set (see ''Related Data Set Metadata'' link below) provides corrected glacier aerodynamic roughness calculated using the new model outlined in Chambers et al.

  • An airborne radar survey was flown as part of the BBAS science programme funded by the British Antarctic Survey over the Pine Island Glacier system during the austral summer of 2004/05. This survey was a collaborative US/UK field campaign which undertook a systematic geophysical survey of the entire Amundsen Sea embayment using comparable airborne survey systems mounted in Twin Otter aircraft. Operating from a temporary field camp (PNE, S 77deg34'' W 095deg56''), we collected ~35,000 km of airborne survey data. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, gravity meter, and the first version of a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN) used for the first time to support this survey. We present here the full radar dataset consisting of the deep-sounding chirp and shallow-sounding pulse-acquired data in their processed form, as well as the navigational information of each trace, the surface and bed elevation picks, ice thickness, and calculated absolute surface and bed elevations. This dataset comes primarily in the form of NetCDF and georeferenced SEGY files. To interactively engage with this newly-published dataset, we also created segmented quicklook PDF files of the radar data.

  • This dataset consists of a bed DEM and four velocity maps of Kongsvegen, a surge-type glacier in Svalbard. The bed DEM was generated from ground-penetrating radar surveys in spring 2016 and 2018, and the velocity maps span the period Dec 2017 to Feb 2019. The velocity maps show the initial speed-up of the glacier as it transitions from quiescence to surge. Data acquisition was funded by NERC Urgency Grant NE/R018243/1 REBUS (Resolving Enthalpy Budget to Understand Surges).

  • The dataset encompasses the processed point clouds (.pts format), a panoramic tour, and a video flythrough of registered point clouds capturing a 122 m long reach of an englacial cut-and-closure channel in the glacier, Austre Broggerbreen, Svalbard, in March 2016. Point clouds were derived from 28 Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys, to characterise the morphology of the channel in three-dimensions and enable extraction of features reflective of hydrological flow conditions. The panoramic tour shows a greyscale image of the scan reflectivity values at each survey location, whereby the lighter the pixel colour, the greater the intensity of the laser beam return. This panoramic tour enables the viewer to self-navigate through the channel to see the morphological features within it. The video flythrough of the point cloud provides a visualisation of the point cloud data, travelling from the glacier surface, down the moulin and along the extent of the scanned reach. The point cloud has been coloured to reflect differences in height. Funding source Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarship (KESS II) under Project AU10003, a pan-Wales higher-level skills initiative led by Bangor University of behalf of the HE sector in Wales. It is part funded by the Welsh Government''s European Social Fund (ESF) convergence programme for West Wales and the Valleys. Funding was awarded to TDLI-F and JEK, with support from Deri Jones & Associates Ltd. Additional support is acknowledged from Aberystwyth University (Department of Geography and Earth Sciences).