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  • Polar View delivers a range of environmental information services for the polar regions derived primarily from satellite imagery and data. The project aims to coordinate delivery of these information products direct to users. Services include enhanced sea ice information (charts and forecasts) as well as ice-edge and iceberg monitoring data. We also provide monitoring services for lake and river ice, snow cover maps and glacier monitoring and assessment. any services are delivered in near real time and are readily accessible via the Internet.

  • A dataset of ice-margin change (advance/recession) at the south-western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet, comprising data from 3325 terrestrial, 439 lacustrine and 35 marine ice-margins respectively. The dataset also comprises measures of ice-marginal lake parameters including area and intersect (length of the lake - ice-margin interface). Measurements were made at approximately five year intervals (epochs) from 1987 to 2015. The ice sheet margin and adjacent ice-marginal lakes were delineated by applying the Normalised Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and the Normalised Difference Water Index (NDWI) respectively to Landsat TM, ETM+ and OLI scenes. Ice-margin changes were measured relative to a series of fixed reference points. The dataset was generated to facilitate comparison of changes at the disparate ice-marginal environments of the ice sheet and investigate temporal patterns of ice-margin recession. The dataset was created and processed by researchers in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds and the Institute of Integrative Biology at the University of Liverpool.

  • This dataset provides the data produced as part of the work published in: Leeson, A. A., Foster, E., Rice, A., Gourmelen, N. and van Wessem, J. M.. 2019. ''Evolution of supraglacial lakes on the Larsen B ice shelf in the decades before it collapsed'' Geophysical Research Letters. It includes 1) shapefiles of supraglacial lakes mapped in both optical (Landsat) and SAR (ERS) satellite imagery, 2) rasters of lake depth, derived from Landsat TM and ETM+ images acquired in 1988 and 2000 and 3) shapefiles of the study area considered in the paper. Funding was provided by ERPSRC grant EP/R01860X/1.

  • Measurements of mean annual temperature in degrees Celsius at 22 sites in Pine Island Glacier, located by hand held Garmin GPS position, and altitude recorded by survey quality Leica GPS. The mean annual temperature of a remote ice sheet site is generally agreed to be equivalent to the temperature measured at 10m depth in a borehole. This dataset records the 10m temperatures at 22 remote sites in the Pine Island Glacier region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Data were recorded on a single thermistor logging thermometer for a period of 12 to 24 hours on the date noted in table (marked in table as ''Single thermistor'') or as the mean of two cables with parallel triple thermistors measured at a single time (date/time noted in table) after a minimum of 12 hours settling in the borehole (marked in table as ''Average of six thermistors''). Measurements were made independently in two boreholes: one drilled to approximately 12m for deployment of a neutron source ice density probe (marked in table as ''10m temperature neutron probe borehole''); one drilled to approximately 50m during recovery of an ice core (marked in table as ''10m temperature ice core borehole''). Some have argued that the mean annual temperature is better measured at 15m in a borehole to remove any trace of the seasonal surface temperature cycle. In the table we additionally record the temperature in the ice core borehole at 15m (marked in table as ''15m temperature ice core borehole'') using a logging PT-100 temperature device (marked in table as ''Single PT-100'').

  • A record of subaerial calving activity at a lacustrine margin of Russell Glacier, west Greenland, comprising 290 calving events classified by volume, area and calving mechanism. Data were acquired continuously from July 2014 to September 2015 using an array of time-lapse cameras. Imagery from the cameras was employed to generate a time-series of ice-margin point clouds, which were then differenced to determine calving properties. The dataset is designed to facilitate the analysis of seasonality in lacustrine calving processes. Supplementary point clouds were also generated to investigate the effects of two lake drainage events on calving processes in the summers of 2014 and 2015. Point cloud parameters and a record of lake stage are also included. The dataset was collected and processed by researchers in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds. Funding was provided by Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors Research Trust (project number 474), The Mount Everest Foundation, The Gilchrist Educational Trust, and Sigma Xi.

  • Polarimetric phase-sensitive radar measurements were collected at the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide on the 25th and 26th December 2019. The measurements were conducted at 10 sites along a 6 km-long transect ~5-10 km northeast of the location of the WAIS Divide Deep Ice Core. At each site, a suite of four quadrature (quad-) polarimetric measurements were collected using an autonomous phase-sensitive radio echo sounder (ApRES) in a single-input single-output (SISO) configuration. The study is part of the Thwaites Interdisciplinary Margin Evolution (TIME) project of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration (ITGC), and is a collaboration between the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) and the United Kingdom Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). It was funded by UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) research grant NE/S006788/1 and USA National Science Foundation (NSF) research grant 1739027.

  • This dataset contains rates of mass change and cumulative mass change and their associated uncertainty for the Antarctic Ice Sheet (in its entirety and split into West Antarctica, East Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula), the Greenland Ice Sheet, and their sum between 1992 and 2020. The data are reconciled estimates of mass balance from three independent satellite-based techniques: altimetry, gravimetry and input-output method. This dataset is part of the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise (IMBIE). This work is an outcome of the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-Comparison Exercise IMBIE) supported by the ESA Climate Change Initiative and the NASA Cryosphere Program. Andrew Shepherd was additionally supported by a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award and the UK Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (cpom30001).

  • During the 2014/2015 season six temporary GNSS stations were deployed on rocky outcrops west of the former Larsen B ice shelf by the University of Leeds and BAS, in the region of the Flask and Leppard Glaciers. This was carried out as part of the NERC funded UKANET project. This is an area we have targeted with a space-based technique called radar interferometry (InSAR), which can provide dense measurements of uplift rates, and the temporary GNSS network were deployed to better understand the contribution of atmospheric noise to the InSAR results. Four were taken out in the same season, while the other two were pulled in the 2015/2016 season. Funding was provided by NERC grant NE/L006065/1.

  • In 2014 polarimetric phase sensitive radar data were collected at Korff Ice Rise, West Antarctica, with the aim of studying fabric within the ice column and ice bed properties. Data were collected at sites within 700m of one another along the axis of the ice divide. The radar data were collected by rotating the antenna through 180 deg to allow reconstruction of the azimuthal variation in power and phase. This study is part of the British Antarctic Survey programme Polar Science for Planet Earth. All data were collected with the support of the British Antarctic Survey. The ApRES fieldwork were funded by Natural Environmental Research Council grant NE/J008087/1, led by Richard Hindmarsh.

  • In 2015 long offset seismic gathers were collected at Korff Ice Rise, West Antarctica, with the aim of studying fabric within the ice column and ice bed properties. Data were collected at sites within 700m of one another along the axis of the ice divide. The seismic gathers were collected at 60 deg intervals to study azimuthal variation in seismic velocity and shear wave splitting. This study is part of the British Antarctic Survey programme Polar Science for Planet Earth. All data were collected with the support of the British Antarctic Survey.