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  • Marine debris washed up on beaches on Goudier Island has been recorded since 2014. Surveys are conducted on a monthly basis when the station is occupied during the summer season. This data contributes to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) Marine Debris programme.

  • The data include size, sex, location and morphological measurements and of Muraenolepis specimens included in Fitzcharles et al. (2021). The morphometric data were primarily collected from fish captured during South Georgia Groundfish Surveys in 2003, 2004 and 2005, with additional data obtained from type specimens and extracted from published descriptions of Muraenolepididae. For genetic studies, tissue samples from the South Georgia specimens were supplemented by additional tissue samples from Muraenolepis in other parts of the Southern Ocean. Source, location and depth of capture are included for all specimens that were sequenced, together with sequence Accession Numbers (to the DNA Database of Japan) for Cox 1 and 16S rRNA sequences. The work was primarily funded by the Government of South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands and was a component part of Elaine Fitzcharles'' PhD (University of St Andrews).

  • Temperature data were collected from a tidepool at Rothera Point, Antarctica every two minutes from February 1999 to May 2000, with the aim of documenting tidal, diurnal and seasonal variability.

  • Collection and preservation of open ocean water samples from stations along a transect in the Barents Sea over the course of a year from July 2017 - July 2018. Four cruises in total to cover seasonal changes, two on board the James Clark Ross (RRS) and two aboard the Helmer Hansen (RV). A standard CTD cast was deployed to collect the samples and depths were selected to support Primary Production experiments on board the ship, with deep samples representing 1 % PAR. Research assistants from SAMS (Scottish Association for Marine Science) were responsible for the sample collection and Elaine Mitchell of SAMS was responsible for the sample analysis and data processing. Funding was provided by the Arctic PRIZE - NERC Thematic grant - Changing Arctic Ocean (CAO) programme - NE/P006302/1.

  • This dataset includes stable nitrogen isotopes of 1- nitrate in sea water (d15NNO3) from three sites (i.e. Southern Barents Sea, Northern Barents Sea, Greenland Sea) and 2- of bulk tissue (d15Nbulk) and compound specific stable nitrogen isotopes on amino acids (d15NAA) measured in adult harp seals from five sites (i.e. Southern Barents Sea, Northern Barents Sea, Greenland Sea, Labrador shelf, Baffin Island) and in adult ringed seals from two sites (Baffin Island and Canadian Archipelago) in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. The sea water samples for analyses of d15NNO3 were collected in 2017 and 2018 as part as two ARISE cruises (JR16006 and JR17005). The seal samples were collected from 2015 to 2019 as part of Norwegian commercial sealing and student field courses from the University of Tromso in Norway (Northern and Southern Barents Sea, Greenland Sea) and the Inuit subsistence and commercial harvests in Canada (Labrador Sea, Baffin Island, Canadian Archipelago). Analyses of d15NNO3 were carried out at the University of Edinburgh, UK. Analyses of d15Nbulk and d15NAA of seal muscle tissue were carried out at the Liverpool Isotopes for Environmental Research laboratory, University of Liverpool. Results are reported here in standard delta-notation per-mil relative to atmospheric N2. Funding was provided by the ARISE project (NE/P006035/1 and NE/P006310/1), as part of the Changing Arctic Ocean programme, funded by the UKRI Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

  • Mesozooplankton were collected with a MOCNESS net system during the oceanographic cruise JR16003 (Dec 2016 to Jan 2017). The MOCNESS comprised 9 separate nets which opened in sequence such that the closing of one net opened the next; net 1 was open during the descent of the net to its maximum depth (1000 m) while the remaining 8 depths opened at regular intervals during the reascent to the surface. All catches were immediately preserved in 4% buffered formaldehyde. Identification of taxa was performed by the Morski Institute (Poland). Specimens were categorised to the lowest possible taxonomic level, which, in some cases, encompassed developmental stages but, in other cases, was limited to higher order taxa. Each taxa was enumerated to determine abundance in units of individuals m-3. The dataset allows examination of the distribution and abundance of these species across Polar Frontal Zone in Southern Ocean Atlantic sector. The survey was funded by The UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and carried out as part of the POETS Wester Core Box and SCOOBIES programmes at British Antarctic Survey. The time of Geraint Tarling and the analysis of the MOCNESS nets was funded by the NERC grant "SeaDNA - Assessing marine biodiversity and structure using environmental DNA: from groundtruthing to food web structure and stability" NE/N00616X/1 PI: Stefano Mariani.

  • Macrozooplankton and nekton were collected with a Rectangular Midwater Trawl 25 (RMT25) over several visits to the sustained observation location P3 (52.70 S, 40.26 W) in the northern Scotia Sea during November and December 2017. The work was carried out as part of the NERC Large Grant, COMICS (Controls on Mesopelagic Interior Carbon) on board the RRS Discovery (cruise DY086). The RMT25 net hauls sampled between 10 and 500 m depth, with the water column divided into 2 depth intervals (10-250 m and 250-500 m). A total of 6 hauls were obtained during 3 separate visits to station P3, each visit comprising a pair of hauls, of which one was carried out in nominal daytime and the other in nominal nighttime. Catches were immediately sorted on board and identified to the lowest taxonomic level feasible. Subsamples of the catches were retained, principally for subsequent biochemical and physiological analyses. In total, 777 fish were caught, belonging to at least 23 species, with catches dominated by the myctophids Krefftichthys anderssoni, Gymnoscopelus braueri, Electrona antarctica and Protomyctophum tenesoni. The water column below 250m was dominated by Bathylagus spp. Temperate myctophid species, such as Protomyctophum parallelum and Protomyctophum andreyeshevi were also caught in small numbers. With regards macrozooplankton, the 250m-500m depth interval was dominated by the jellyfish, Atolla and Periphylla. The tunicate Salpa thompsoni and the euphausiids Euphausia triacantha and Thysanoessa spp. were also relatively abundant. Jellyfish still dominated catches in shallower waters (250m-10m), closely followed by euphausiids and Salpa thompsoni and chaetognaths. Themisto gaudichaudii and Parandania boecki were the most numerous amphipod species caught. Decapods were only caught in the deeper depth interval, both day and night.

  • During the 2019/20 austral summer, an unoccupied aerial vehicle (UAV; drone) was used to collect imagery of breeding populations of seals, penguins and albatross. Two extensive southern elephant seal breeding sites were surveyed with complete counts made around the peak pupping date. A total of nine islands historically recorded as breeding sites for wandering albatross were surveyed. Populations of Adelie and chinstrap penguin colonies at the South Sandwich Islands, an extensive king penguin colony on South Georgia and a macaroni penguin colony, also on South Georgia, were also included in the surveys. The South Georgia aspects of this work were funded by grants to the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) from the Government of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands and UK Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office. The South Sandwich Islands expedition was funded by the John Ellerman Foundation and donations from passengers on Quark Expeditions'' ships.

  • Water column acoustic data collected in the Atlantic Ocean (from 2016-09-26 to 2016-11-03) during cruise JR16001. Multi-frequency (38,120 and 200 kHz) acoustic data were collected using a Simrad EK60 echo sounder. The dataset comprises of calibrated and processed 38 kHz volume backscattering strength (Sv, dB re 1m-1). Data processing was undertaken using Echoview and Matlab. Processed netCDF data files are made available as part of the NERC Southern Ocean Network of Acoustics (SONA) and the EU MESOPP project.

  • Among all possible interaction types, trophic interactions are easily observable and essential in terms of energy transfer, and thus binary networks have arisen as the most straightforward method to describe complex ecological communities. These food-web models also inform on the ecosystem dynamics and function, and the patterns arising from food web topology can be indicators for ecosystem stability. We present a comprehensive pelagic network for the Scotia Sea underpinned by surveys and dietary studies conducted in the Scotia Sea in the last century. Selection of the trophic links followed a protocol based on taxonomy and geographic location, and was further refined based on the consumer and resource depth ranges and their body size ratios. The resulting network consists on 228 nodes and 10880 links which represent the main trophic paths in the Scotia Sea ecosystem and can serve as a basis for ecosystem modelling in the Scotia Sea or comparison with other ecosystems. Funding was provided by NERC Highlight Topic grant NE/N005937/1 and NERC Fellowship NE/L011840/1.