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  • Seventy-nine Antarctic ice core snow accumulation records were gathered as part of a community led project coordinated by the PAGES Antarctica 2k working group. Individual ice core records (kg m2 yr-1) were normalised relative to a reference period (1960-1990). The normalised records were separated into seven geographical regions and averaged together to form the regional composites. The seven geographical regions are: East Antarctica; Wilkes Land Coast; Weddell Sea Coast; Antarctic Peninsula; West Antarctic Ice Sheet; Victoria Land; and Dronning Maud Land. Full data description and methods can be found in Thomas et al., 2017. This record also includes the original data, from which the composite records were produced. This dataset represents an updated version of another published dataset. The update was necessary due to erroneous data contained in the files. Please use this corrected dataset in preference to the other one.

  • Seventy-nine Antarctic ice core snow accumulation records were gathered as part of a community led project coordinated by the PAGES Antarctica 2k working group. Individual ice core records (kg m2 yr-1) were normalised relative to a reference period (1960-1990). The normalised records were separated into seven geographical regions and averaged together to form the regional composites. The seven geographical regions are: East Antarctica; Wilkes Land Coast; Weddell Sea Coast; Antarctic Peninsula; West Antarctic Ice Sheet; Victoria Land; and Dronning Maud Land. Full data description and methods can be found in Thomas et al., 2017. This record also includes the original data, from which the composite records were produced. Due to erroneous data contained in the files, this dataset has been superseded by a corrected version. Please use that corrected dataset in preference to this one to avoid the problem. The DOI for the updated data is: 10.5285/cc1d42de-dfe6-40aa-a1a6-d45cb2fc8293

  • A record of the oxygen-isotope ratios and net accumulation from an ice core drilled on Dyer Plateau in the Antarctic Peninsula is presented. This 233 m long ice core was drilled in the southern summer season of 1989/90. The isotope data covers the years 1505 to 1988. The snow accumulation data covers 1840 to 1988.

  • Ground truth measurements in the form of snow/ice cores were obtained from three sites in 2006: Rothschild Island, Latady Island and Smyley Island. The sites selected corresponded to the position of Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) deployed during the previous season. At both the Rothschild Island and Smyley Island sites the AWS - due to an unprecedented amount of snowfall - had been buried. Therefore, two cores, 8m and 12m in length, were obtained from the approximate position of the AWS, in addition to the sampling of a snow pit. At the Latady Island site, the top 60cm of the 5m AWS was protruding above the surface - again, due to an unprecedented amount of snowfall. A diagonally descending trench was dug to recover the AWS and two cores were collected at this site. This work was carried out as part of a project to understand how air mass origin and meteorology affect the mass accumulation of snow in areas of the Antarctic Peninsula, and how the atmosphere''s properties are preserved in the snow, Photographs of the expedition showing the ground layout, the situation of the cores and what was done when they were gathered are available and stored with the data.

  • This dataset presents the annual and sub-annual diatom records preserved in a set of ice cores from the Antarctic Peninsula and Ellsworth Land over the 1992-2019 CE interval, as presented in Tetzner et al. (2022). This dataset was created with the support of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (grant number 72180432).

  • We present the age scales for three Antarctic Peninsula (AP) ice cores: Palmer, Rendezvous, and Jurassic. The three age scales are all from intermediate-depth cores, in the 133-141 m depth range. The Palmer age scale covers 390 years, 1621-2011 C.E., and is from one of the oldest AP cores. Rendezvous and Jurassic are from lower elevation high-snow accumulation sites and therefore cover shorter intervals, 1843-2011 C.E. and 1874-2011 C.E., respectively. The Palmer, Rendezvous, and Jurassic cores were all drilled in November-December 2012 using the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) electromechanical dry drill (without drill fluid). Water isotopes and the chemical species used to establish the age scales were measured in the ice core labs at BAS (Cambridge, UK) using Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) or from melted discrete cut ice samples. The annual-layer markers for dating of the cores were primarily determined using nssSO4 and H2O2 summer peaks, with d18O and MSA as additional support. This research effort was carried out by the BAS Ice Core group and the established age scales will provide the foundation for multiple upcoming projects. The ice core drilling and analysis was funded by the British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, Cambridge, UK), part of UK research and innovation and NERC grant [NE/J020710/1]. Palmer analysis was funded by Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW, Berlin, Germany), in collaboration with the Anthropocene working group (AWG).

  • Young Island is a new ice core drilling site uniquely positioned to give insight into the (sub-)Antarctic climate. This dataset contains four preliminary dating approaches that lay the foundation for the age scale of the Young Island ice core presented in Moser et al. (2021). Funding was provided to SubICE by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, the Swiss Polar Institute, and Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc (grant no. SubICE). ERT received core funding from NERC to the British Antarctic Survey''s Ice Dynamics and Palaeoclimate programme. DEM was supported by BAS, Cambridge, and the NERC C-CLEAR doctoral training programme (grant no. NE/S007164/1). JBP received grant funding from the Australian Government.

  • This dataset contains ice core data for the ISOL-ICE core recovered from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica in January 2017. The core is 120 m in depth and spans a 1349 +/- 3 year period from 2017 to 668 AD. The core was dated by annual layer counting and identifying volcanic horizons as fixed time markers. High-resolution stable nitrate isotopic composition data is accompanied by chemistry data, conductivity, density, insoluble particle counts (dust), and snow accumulation rate data. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/N011813/1.

  • These 21 Last Interglacial (LIG) summer surface air temperature (SSAT) observations were compiled to assess LIG Arctic sea ice (Guarino et al 2020). Twenty of the observations were also previously used in the IPCC-AR5 report. Each observation is thought to be of summer LIG air temperature anomaly relative to present day and is located in the circum-Arctic region. All sites are from north of 51N. There are 7 terrestrial based temperature records; 8 lacustrine records; 2 marine pollen-based records; and 3 ice core records included in the original compilation. This compilation includes 1 additional ice core record. This work was funded by NERC standard research grant nos. NE/P013279/1 and NE/P009271/1.

  • This dataset provides an annual isotope record from the Gomez (GZ07) ice core, dating back to the 1850s. The 136 m core was drilled on the South-western Antarctic Peninsula, during January 2007. We present a new 150-year, high-resolution, stable isotope record (delta-O-18) from the Gomez ice core, drilled on the data sparse south western Antarctic Peninsula. The record is highly correlated with satellite-derived temperature reconstructions and instrumental records from Faraday station on the north west coast, thus making it a robust proxy for local and regional temperatures since the 1850s.