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  • This resource contains anonymised interviews with community members in Chundu Ward, Hurungwe District, Zimbabwe, conducted to further our understanding of how the local community interacts with tsetse. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants in 2012 to 2013 to investigate livelihood strategies including hunting, livestock keeping and cultivation, and how they influenced the risk of contracting trypanosomiasis. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) occurs sporadically within the Zambezi Valley in Zimbabwe and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes). African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT) is more prevalent and places significant constraints on livestock keeping. Approaches taken by local people to control or manage the disease were also investigated during the interviews. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and these interviews contributed to this consortium. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f712c52f-1ce9-4603-bc33-685221a14f50

  • This resource contains tsetse fly count data recorded during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. Tsetse sampling was conducted along a 60 kilometre transect from the plateau region on the eastern side of the Luangwa Valley to the floor of the valley, near Mfuwe Airport. Tsetse flies were sampled using black screen fly rounds. The first survey was conducted in May and June (cold, dry season) and the second survey in November (hot dry season). The Luangwa Valley in Zambia is an old focus of human sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) and sporadic outbreaks have occurred in the human population. In recent years there has been an influx of people migrating from the densely populated plateau region resulting in a significant change in land-use in the study area, potentially influencing the distribution and density of tsetse. This work was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and contributed to the Zambia trypanosomiasis case study. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59fc6e1a-e1cb-4bcf-8b49-68211b2a363a

  • This dataset contains the results of 211 household surveys conducted in Mambwe District, Zambia, as part of a wider study looking at human and animal trypanosomiasis and changing settlement patterns in the area. The interviews were conducted from June 2013 to August 2013. The objective of the survey was to set the health of people and their animals in the context of overall household wellbeing, assets and access to resources. The topics covered included household demographics, human and animal health, access to and use of medical and veterinary services, livestock and dog demographics, livestock production, human and animal contacts with wildlife, crop and especially cotton production, migration, access to water and fuel use, household assets and poverty, resilience and values. The dataset has been anonymised by removing names of respondents, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) location of their homes and names of interviewers. Household numbers were retained. Written consent was obtained prior to commencing all interviews. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC), and these data contributed to the research carried out by the consortium. The research was funded by NERC with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b1647138-49f5-4777-a39d-e7359bf7b98d