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Environmental survey

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  • Data comprise plot location (latitude, longitude, elevation), taxonomic family and species names and measurements of trees (diameter, height, health). Presence of lianas (vines) and their measurements were also recorded. Funder: NERC - Brazil (CONFAP) Newton Fund: “Dry forest biomes in Brazil: biodiversity and ecosystem services” (NE/N000587/1) Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/aa3babe9-072c-42ce-9ea5-9dbb921a922d

  • Data comprise mealworm predation rates measured after 24 hours exposure to invertebrates in mature oil palm (2014), and mature and replanted oil palm (2016-2017) plots as part of a large-scale ecological experiment programme (the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture project, established in 2013). Eighteen plots were examined across three estates – plots in Ujung Tanjung and Kandista estates were planted in 1987 to 1992 and are mature or over-mature oil palm, while Libo plots (2016-2017 dataset only) were replanted in 2014. Plots were organised in triplets and in in Ujung Tanjung and Kandista, for each triplet one plot was assigned to each of three vegetation treatments: Reduced vegetation cover, normal vegetation management and enhanced vegetation cover. Freshly-killed mealworms (larvae of darkling beetles, Tenebrionidae sp.) were glued onto oil palm fronds trimmed so that ca. 10 cm of each of six leaflets remained. Exclusion and stratum treatments in factorial combinations were applied: caged and uncaged, canopy and ground. The cage exclusion treatments were designed so that most invertebrates could access the fronds but vertebrates could not. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/03d36ac4-4cf4-46d9-a608-866ba0aab458

  • Data comprise soil organic carbon content from a simulation using the ECOSSE model; a pool-based carbon and nitrogen turnover model. Simulations were performed using input data from the Sunjia research farm in southeast China (Jianxi province). Data here is from simulations using the global version of the ECOSSE model, a package which applies the regular model spatially. Input data for the simulations were provided by the soil science department of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Simulations were conducted in 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/876fa724-c3d3-4091-8de2-8140b7c973eb

  • Data comprise soil organic carbon (SOC) content from soil simulations in a small agricultural catchment (Sunjia) which is part of the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in southeast China (Jianxi province). The simulations were performed using the ECOSSE model (a pool-based carbon and nitrogen turnover model) and soil and climate input data were provided by the research farm at the soil science department of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Simulations were conducted in 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f8955c65-0103-4a26-9078-f34ec6a28676

  • This dataset consists of metal concentrations measured from soils sampled across Great Britain in 1998. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/def15f47-6aba-43db-a833-5844628a658b

  • This dataset includes measured DOC concentration, and modelled DOC concentration derived from UV-visible absorbance spectra. We also include measured chlorophyll concentration, pH and conductivity. The natural water samples were collected from freshwater ecosystems in the UK, and site names and locations. Samples were also collected at set intervals throughout the year, from mesocosm experiments simulating natural lake ecosystems. Data on measured and modelled DOC concentration, chlorophyll concentration, pH and conductivity for the mesocosms sampled, are also included. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6abbc357-1b69-49b4-be28-a77eb7bc6c7f

  • The collection contains three packages of data relating to hunting and law enforcement in Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Cambodia: (1) a household survey intended to estimate the prevalence of different hunting behaviours and wildlife consumption, local communities’ knowledge of rules, and their perceptions of the ranger patrols responsible for enforcing rules, (2) an experiment designed to measure the ability of ranger patrols to detect snares in a tropical forest environment, and (3) an experiment designed to measure the length of time a snare remains an active threat after it is set. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the UK Data Service ReShare repository

  • Summary output data (including soil organic carbon concentration, nitrogen, available water and carbon dioxide) from simulations of soil in a small agricultural catchment (Sunjia) in Southeast China (Jianxi province). The simulations were performed using the ECOSSE model; a pool-based carbon and nitrogen turnover model. The simulations were performed using soil and climate input data from the research farm. Input data for the simulations were provided by the soil science department of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Simulations were conducted in 2017. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2ce71612-df48-40f2-9402-03d93104c623

  • Dataset contains DNA sequencing from reciprocal crosses of B.terrestris dalmatinus and B.terrestris audax which were carried out by Biobest, Leuven. Four successful colonies (one of each cross direction) from two ’families’ were housed at the University of Leuven and kept in 21◦C with red light conditions, they were fed ad libitum with pollen and a sugar syrup. Callow workers were tagged in order to determine age. Worker reproductive status was confirmed by ovary dissection and entire bodies were then stored at -80◦C along with the original queen mothers and male fathers. Three reproductive workers, aged 16-17days, were selected from queen-less conditions from each of the crosses. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the NCBI SRA under BioProject PRJNA573820

  • This dataset consists of freshwater pond quality data for sites across Great Britain in 2007. Data include macrophyte species records, chemistry and water quality, and environmental variables such as pollution, grazing and management, from ponds surveyed within a set of 591 1km squares across Great Britain (note - not all squares contained ponds). The survey was part of Countryside Survey, a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, and was carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and Pond Conservation. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to freshwater habitat data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cbb9ee99-8078-4dc4-87de-ee99390e579e