Keyword

Fish

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  • The resource consists of cartesian coordinates, expressed in units of pixels for groups of eight individual fish, swimming in a shoal. The fish were filmed from above with a high resolution video camera. The data were generated from the images and video using automated two-dimensional tracking software. A food stimulus delivering a single food reward was presented six times per trial. The data were collected between July and August 2017 in a controlled fish laboratory at the University of Bristol by the data authors. The data were collected to test the effects of group behaviour in fish shoals on foraging performance. There are instances where one or more fish in a frame could not be tracked. Where such instances occur are indicated in the data files. The research was funded through NERC grant NE/P012639/1 Hunger and knowledge: foraging decisions in an uncertain and social world All procedures regarding the use of animals in research followed United Kingdom guidelines and were approved by the University of Bristol Ethical Review Group (UIN UB/17/060). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/08305a43-79b5-432f-ad20-2ddffe0d1077

  • [This nonGeographicDataset is embargoed until May 31, 2022]. The resource consists of cartesian coordinates, expressed in units of pixels, for fish swimming individually, in groups of six individuals, and in groups of six individuals while presented repeatedly with a food stimulus delivering two food items until satiation. The fish were filmed from above with a high resolution video camera. The data were generated from the images and video using automated two-dimensional tracking software. The data were collected between September 2019 and March 2020 in a controlled fish laboratory at the University of Bristol by the data authors. The data were collected to test how individual temperament and the acquisition of knowledge and satiation interact when animals make foraging decisions in groups. There are instances where one or more fish in a frame could not be tracked. Where such instances occur are indicated in the data files. The research was funded through NERC grant NE/P012639/1 Hunger and knowledge: foraging decisions in an uncertain and social world. All procedures regarding the use of animals in research followed United Kingdom guidelines and were approved by the University of Bristol Ethical Review Group (UIN UB/17/060). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/26f045c3-946b-4115-baf1-defb19bdba42

  • QUEST Fish was led by Dr Manuel Barange (PML) with 18 co-investigators from POL, PML, CEFAS, University of Plymouth, University of Portsmouth, CSIC (Spain), UEA, WorldFish Centre, IPSL, ICES (Denmark), Met Office, IRD (Paris) and University of North Carolina, as part of QUEST (Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System) This dataset collection contains global fish biomass estimates from the Global Coastal-Ocean Modelling System. QUEST-Fish has delivered a near-global assessment of consequences of climate change for fisheries, demonstrating excellent and innovative bridging of marine biogeochemistry models and socio-economics. QUEST-Fish specifically focused on the added impacts that climate change is likely to cause on global fish production, and on the subsequent additional risks and vulnerabilities to human societies. The team have demonstrated the broad capability of an integrated regional coastal/shelf seas model system. The physical-ecological POLCOMS-ERSEM model that underpinned the research was developed for Europe’s regional seas. Its application to 20 Large Marine Ecosystems (coastal bioregions) worldwide, covering two-thirds of the world’s fish catch, has been critically evaluated and found adequate for most regions (the physical and biogeochemical differences of the upwelling region off Peru presents challenges, with the climate impact likely to be over-expressed in the fisheries projection output).

  • These data show the presence/absence and identification of Cryptosporidium species from the results of a molecular survey of various upland river biota aquatic invertebrates, biofilms, mammal droppings and fish guts, gills and faeces. Samples were collected from various upland influenced sites from around Wales between 2012 and 2015 and were collected. Additionally, otter samples from UK-wide project were also tested. Sample collection was primarily undertaken by DURESS researchers at Cardiff University. Sample testing and analysis was performed at the Cryptosporidium Reference Unit, Public Health Wales Microbiology, Swansea. DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit (Gentra PureGene), Qiagen stool and tissue DNA kits for the fish and mammal samples. These data were collected to provide new information required for the production of a catchment pathogen model to inform ecosystems (dis)services analysis of land use change scenarios for the Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project, part of the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) BESS Programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/84242834-dc78-49a6-83cb-951edac65d18

  • Data are of speed and accuracy of decision making in stickleback fish of different personalities. A laboratory population of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were repeatedly tested in a T-maze. The work was carried out between March 2012 and February 2013 at The Structure and Motion Laboratory, Royal Veterinary College. The work was funded by a BBSRC studentship, NERC ( grant NE/H016600/2 Does diversity deliver? How variation in individual knowledge and behavioural traits impact on the performance of animal groups) and The Royal Society (RG 110401) All animal care and experimental procedures described here were approved as non-regulatory procedures by the Ethics and Welfare Committee of the Royal Veterinary College, London (URN 2011 1084). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ed2ab55-0688-4513-be9a-f9f0f21d2788

  • QUEST Fish was led by Dr Manuel Barange (PML) with 18 co-investigators from POL, PML, CEFAS, University of Plymouth, University of Portsmouth, CSIC (Spain), UEA, WorldFish Centre, IPSL, ICES (Denmark), Met Office, IRD (Paris) and University of North Carolina, as part of QUEST (Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System). QUEST-Fish specifically focused on the added impacts that climate change is likely to cause on global fish production, and on the subsequent additional risks and vulnerabilities to human societies. This dataset contains global fish biomass estimates from the Global Coastal-Ocean Modelling System.

  • The dataset contains measurements of the annual average abundance, biomass and elemental composition (C, N, P) of consumers (fish and invertebrates) in six rivers within sub-catchments of the Hampshire Avon of contrasting geology (clay, sand, chalk). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6e9a9a6e-1b42-46db-973b-06c1db2961c0

  • This dataset compiles fish length and weight measurements from the RMT-25 net hauls carried out on Discovery 2010 cruises (JR161, JR177, JR200) in the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean in spring 2006, summer 2008, and autumn 2009. The dataset comprises of the station net hauls only. Research cruises were led by British Antarctic Survey aboard the RRS James Clark Ross. Net hauls were conducted along a transect from the Antarctic Polar Front to the sea ice zone in the Scotia Sea. Hauls included in this dataset are depth stratified (1000-700 m, 700-400 m, 400-200 m, 200 m to surface). Individual fish lengths, and weights were measured on board. Where weights were not measured, length-weight regressions have been used to estimate fish weight. This data set accompanies the paper by Belcher et al. in Marine Ecology Progress Series, titled, Respiration rates and active carbon flux of mesopelagic fishes (Family Myctophidae) in the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean.