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  • The BGS Geological Indicators of Flooding (GIF) dataset is a digital map based on the BGS Digital Geological Map of Great Britain at the 1:50,000 scale (DiGMapGB-50, BGS, 2009). Current coverage includes England, Wales and Scotland. It characterises Superficial Deposits on DiGMapGB-50 in terms of their likely susceptibility to flooding, either from coastal inundation or fluvial (inland) water flow. These Superficial Deposits are considered 'recent' in geological terms, most having been formed within the last few tens of thousands of years. Typically they have been laid down by processes of erosion and deposition and they have produced subtle topographical features, resulting in low-lying landforms we call floodplains. The mapping of these landforms, in conjunction with characterisation of deposits that underlie them allows us to determine the extent of the coastal and inland flooding that created them.

  • BGS GeoScour v2 provides river scour susceptibility information for Great Britain using a three-tiered data provision allowing increasing levels of understanding at different resolutions from catchment to local (channel/reach) scales. GeoScour v2 includes 18 GIS layers, providing information on the natural characteristics and properties of catchment and riverine environments for the assessment of river scour in Great Britain. The dataset product fills a gap in current scour modelling, with the input of geological properties. It provides an improved toolkit to more easily assess and raise the profile of scour risk, now and in the future, to help infrastructure providers and funders prioritise resources, identify remedial works to preclude costly and prevent disruptive failures. The product has broad applications through its adaptation to suit multiple types of asset susceptible to fluvial erosion. GeoScour looks specifically at the geological factors that influence scour and does not consider any hydraulic or hydrodynamic factors. The GeoScour Dataset Product is designed to be used by multiple stakeholders with differing needs and therefore, can be interrogated at a number of levels. Tier 1 A catchment stability dataset provides a summary overview of the catchment characteristics, typical response type, and evolution. It can be used as a high-level overview for incorporation into catchment management plans, national reviews and catchment comparisons using Tier 2 datasets are available as smaller catchment areas and focusses on providing data for more detailed catchment management, natural flood management and similar uses. It analyses geological properties such as flood accommodation space, catchment run-off potential, geomorphology types, and additional summary statistics for worst, average, and best-case scenarios for underlying surface geology scour susceptibility, as well as additional summary statistics of key environmental parameters such as protected sites and urban coverage. Tier 3 datasets provide the detailed riverine information that is designed to be incorporated into more complex river scour models. It provides the baseline geological context for river scour development and processes and identifies important factors that should be considered in any scour model. Factors such as material mineralogy, strength and density are key properties that can influence a river’s ability to scour. In addition, an assessment of river fall, sinuosity and flood accommodation space is also provided. This data is of use to those assessing the propensity for river scour for any given reach of a river across Great Britain and can be used as an input into hydraulic/hydrodynamic models. Tier 1 and 2 datasets are Open Government Licence (OGL), Tier 3 is licenced.

  • BGS GeoScour provides river scour susceptibility information for Great Britain using a three-tiered data provision allowing increasing levels of understanding at different resolutions from catchment to local (channel/reach) scales. GeoScour includes 11 GIS layers, providing information on the natural characteristics and properties of catchment and riverine environments for the assessment of river scour in Great Britain. The data product fills a gap in current scour modelling, with the input of geological properties. It provides an improved toolkit to more easily assess and raise the profile of scour risk, now and in the future, to help infrastructure providers and funders prioritise resources, identify remedial works to preclude costly and prevent disruptive failures. The data product has broad applications through its adaptation to suit multiple types of asset likely to be affected by fluvial erosion. The GeoScour Data Product is designed to be used by multiple stakeholders with differing needs and therefore, can be interrogated at a number of levels. Tier 1 data provides a summary overview of the catchment characteristics, typical response type, and evolution. It can be used as a high-level overview for incorporation into catchment management plans, national reviews and catchment comparisons. Tier 2 data are available as smaller catchment areas and focusses on providing data for more detailed catchment management, natural flood management and similar uses. It analyses geological properties such as flood accommodation space, catchment run-off potential, and geomorphology types, as well as additional summary statistics of key environmental parameters such as protected sites and urban coverage. Tier 3 data provide the detailed riverine information that is designed to be incorporated into more complex river scour models. It provides the baseline geological context for river scour development and processes and identifies important factors that should be considered in any scour model. Factors such as material mineralogy, strength and density are key properties that can influence a river’s ability to scour. In addition, an assessment of river fall, sinuosity and flood accommodation space is also provided. This data is of use to all users assessing the propensity for river scour for any given reach of a river across Great Britain. Tier 1 and 2 data are available with an OGL, Tier 3 data is licenced.

  • The groundwater flooding susceptibility data shows the degree to which areas of England, Scotland and Wales are susceptible to groundwater flooding on the basis of geological and hydrogeological conditions. It does not show the likelihood of groundwater flooding occurring, i.e. it is a hazard not risk-based dataset. The data covers Great Britain in a consistent manner. It will be updated periodically (at least bi-annually) as the underlying datasets or the methodology to derive the groundwater flooding susceptibility data are improved. The data is based on data sets with a range of resolutions, but the derived data set has an effective spatial resolution of about 50m by 50m. The susceptibility data is suitable for use for regional or national planning purposes where the groundwater flooding information will be used along with a range of other relevant information to inform land-use planning decisions. It might also be used in conjunction with a large number of other factors, e.g. records of previous incidence of groundwater flooding, rainfall, property type, and land drainage information, to establish relative, but not absolute, risk of groundwater flooding at a resolution of greater than a few hundred metres. In all cases it is strongly recommend the confidence data is used in conjunction with the groundwater flooding susceptibility data. The susceptibility data should not be used on its own to make planning decisions at any scale, and, in particular, should not be used to inform planning decisions at the site scale. The susceptibility data cannot be used on its own to indicate risk of groundwater flooding.

  • Ensemble of simulated groundwater levels for Iloilo, Philippines. The simulated time series of data covers the period December 1979 to December 2089 under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP2.6 and RCP 8.5). Each ensemble member csv file contains a timeseries of groundwater levels for thirteen locations within the Iloilo region. The textfile included in the folder shows the coordinates for these locations.

  • Ensemble of simulated groundwater levels for Central Luzon, Philippines. The simulated time series of data covers the period December 1979 to December 2089 under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP2.6 and RCP 8.5). Each ensemble member csv file contains a timeseries of groundwater levels for five locations within the Central Luzon region. The textfile included in the folder shows the coordinates for these locations.

  • 2 examples of Integrated Water Vapour Transport (IVT) maps generated using a new algorithm produced from the work done under the Grant. This algorithm has been published and the article can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012JD018027/abstract

  • This dataset consists of computer code transcripts for two proprietary flood risk models from a study as part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. This project was conceived in order to address the public controversies generated by the risk management strategies and forecasting technologies associated with diffuse environmental problems such as flooding and pollution. Environmental issues play an ever-increasing role in all of our daily lives. However, controversies surrounding many of these issues, and confusion surrounding the way in which they are reported, mean that sectors of the public risk becoming increasingly disengaged. To try to reverse this trend and regain public trust and engagement, this project aimed to develop a new approach to interdisciplinary environmental science, involving non-scientists throughout the process. Examining the relationship between science and policy, and in particular how to engage the public with scientific research findings, a major diffuse environmental management issue was chosen as a focus - flooding. As part of this approach, non-scientists were recruited alongside the investigators in forming Competency Groups - an experiment in democratising science. The Competency Groups were composed of researchers and laypeople for whom flooding is a matter of particular concern. The groups worked together to share different perspectives - on why flooding is a problem, on the role of science in addressing the problem, and on new ways of doing science together. We aimed to achieve four substantive contributions to knowledge: 1. To analyse how the knowledge claims and modelling technologies of hydrological science are developed and put into practice by policy makers and commercial organisations (such as insurance companies) in flood risk management. 2. To develop an integrated model for forecasting the in-river and floodplain effects of rural land management practices. 3. To experiment with a new approach to public engagement in the production of interdisciplinary environmental science, involving the use of Competency Groups. 4. To evaluate this new approach to doing public science differently and to identify lessons learnt that can be exported beyond this particular project to other fields of knowledge controversy. This dataset consists of computer code transcripts for two proprietary flood risk models. Flood risk and modelling interview transcripts from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6620 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).