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Geomagnetism

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  • High frequency (100 Hz) data from two horizontal induction coils measuring the Earth's magnetic field at the Eskdalemuir Observatory in the United Kingdom. The data covers the period from January 2014 to December 2014. Also included are examples of Matlab code and the frequency calibration files to convert to the raw data to SI units. Thumbnail spectrograms and metadata about the setup and equipment is also supplied.

  • High frequency (100 Hz) data from two horizontal induction coils measuring the Earth's magnetic field at the Eskdalemuir Observatory in the United Kingdom. The data covers the period from January 2016 to December 2016. Also included are examples of Matlab code and the frequency calibration files to convert to the raw data to SI units. Thumbnail spectrograms and metadata are also supplied.

  • High frequency (100 Hz) data from two horizontal induction coils measuring the Earth's magnetic field at the Eskdalemuir Observatory in the United Kingdom. The data covers the period from January 2015 to December 2015. Also included are examples of Matlab code and the frequency calibration files to convert to the raw data to SI units. Thumbnail spectrograms and metadata about the setup and equipment is also supplied.

  • Digital hourly mean values of the Geomagnetic field elements from Lerwick, Eskdalemuir, Abinger and Hartland Observatories. Eskdalemuir data are available from 1911, Lerwick from 1926, Hartland from 1957 and all three are available up to yesterday's date. Values from Abinger (1926-1956) are available on request. Most data are definitive, but recent data (within the last 203 years) are provisional and may be corrected in the future. Values of declination (D), horizontal intensity (H) and vertical intensity (Z) are available. The units of declination are degrees. Declination is negative when west of true north. The units of horizontal intensity and vertical intensity are nT (nanotesla). Vertical intensity is positive in the downwards direction. The data from these observatories will not only aid scientific research into rates of change of the magnetic field and increase the accuracy of the BGS Global Geomagnetic Model, but will also provide data to exploration geophysicists engaged in current and future oil exploration.

  • Annual means of the geomagnetic field vector components from observatories around the world, from 1840 to the present day. At present there are about 160 observatories. These data are useful for tracking changes in the magnetic field generated inside the Earth. Data are produced by a number of organisations around the world, including BGS. Data are available in plain text from www.geomag.bgs.ac.uk. This data is connected to other geomagnetic data sets, but can be used without reference to them.

  • Data extracted from simulations of rapidly-rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere and published in Guervilly & Cardin, 2017, Geophys. J. Int. 211, 455-471 (DOI:10.1093/gji/ggx315). The simulations were run for Ekman numbers of 1e-7 and 1e-8 and Prandtl numbers of 0.1 and 0.01. The data consist of tables of input and output parameters (Reynolds number of the convective and zonal flows, convective lengthscale and Rhines scale).

  • Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the Whiteadder Moor remote site (WHIR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the Whiteadder Moor underline site (WHIU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert et al. (2020) for further details.

  • Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the Abbey St. Bathans remote site (ASBR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the Abbey St. Bathans underline site (ASBU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert et al (2020) for further details.

  • Magnetograms are records of variations in the strength and direction of the Earth’s magnetic field. Historically these magnetograms were recorded on paper using photographic techniques. In the UK, measurements were made at eight long-running observatories; Abinger, Eskdalemuir, Falmouth, Greenwich, Hartland, Kew, Lerwick, and Stonyhurst. BGS also hold magnetogram records from the Cape Evans observatory that ran continuously at Robert Falcon Scott’s Antarctic base camp during the British Antarctic Expedition 1910–13. The magnetogram collection, one of the longest running geomagnetic series in the world, provides a continuous record of more than 160 years of UK measurements. These magnetograms start in the 1840s and end in 1986 at which time digital recording of the magnetic field took over and magnetograms can be produced by computer graphic. The plots show variation in the Earth's magnetic field, typically over a 24-hour period. The collection is a valuable, partly untapped data resource for studying geomagnetic storms, space weather and the evolution of the Earth’s magnetic field. The magnetograms provide insight into: • the Earth’s outer core: long-term change (years to centuries) in the dynamo that sustains our magnetic field • space weather: short-term changes (seconds to days) in near-Earth space and on the ground • space climate: long-term change (decades to centuries) in solar activity and consequences for Earth’s environment All the above have an impact on human activities. For example, bad space weather affects technologies that we increasingly rely on, such as electrical power and GPS networks. In response to the threat of loss from degradation due to age and a desire to preserve and exploit old data, BGS undertook a programme of work to digitally photograph, archive and preserve the analogue paper records of magnetic field variation in the United Kingdom. Between 2009 and 2013, high-quality digital images of every available magnetogram were taken. These images are available to search online. Scientists and the general public around the world can now gain easy access to this historical dataset.

  • Magnetograms are records of variations in the strength and direction of the Earth’s magnetic field. Historically these magnetograms were recorded on paper using photographic techniques. In the UK, measurements were made at eight long-running observatories; Abinger, Eskdalemuir, Falmouth, Greenwich, Hartland, Kew, Lerwick, and Stonyhurst. BGS also hold magnetogram records from the Cape Evans observatory that ran continuously at Robert Falcon Scott’s Antarctic base camp during the British Antarctic Expedition 1910–13. The magnetogram collection, one of the longest running geomagnetic series in the world, provides a continuous record of more than 160 years of UK measurements. These magnetograms start in the 1840s and end in 1986 at which time digital recording of the magnetic field took over and magnetograms can be produced by computer graphic. The plots show variation in the Earth's magnetic field, typically over a 24-hour period. The collection is a valuable, partly untapped data resource for studying geomagnetic storms, space weather and the evolution of the Earth’s magnetic field. The magnetograms provide insight into: • the Earth’s outer core: long-term change (years to centuries) in the dynamo that sustains our magnetic field • space weather: short-term changes (seconds to days) in near-Earth space and on the ground • space climate: long-term change (decades to centuries) in solar activity and consequences for Earth’s environment All the above have an impact on human activities. For example, bad space weather affects technologies that we increasingly rely on, such as electrical power and GPS networks. In response to the threat of loss from degradation due to age and a desire to preserve and exploit old data, BGS undertook a programme of work to digitally photograph, archive and preserve the analogue paper records of magnetic field variation in the United Kingdom. Between 2009 and 2013, high-quality digital images of every available magnetogram were taken. These images are available to search online. Scientists and the general public around the world can now gain easy access to this historical dataset.