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  • Annual means of the geomagnetic field vector components from observatories around the world, from 1840 to the present day. At present there are about 160 observatories. These data are useful for tracking changes in the magnetic field generated inside the Earth. Data are produced by a number of organisations around the world, including BGS. Data are available in plain text from www.geomag.bgs.ac.uk. This data is connected to other geomagnetic data sets, but can be used without reference to them.

  • The Single Onshore Borehole Index (SOBI) is an index of over 1 million boreholes, shafts and wells and references collections of digital and analogue records from all forms of drilling and site investigation work held by the BGS. The index covers onshore and near shore boreholes from Great Britain dating back to at least 1790 and ranging from one to several thousand metres deep. Some 50,000 new boreholes are added each year. The majority of the records contain written descriptions of the ground encountered. The SOBI index database originated in 1988 from a number of existing tables and from data input from a variety of coding forms. Therefore not all fields in the database are populated and data that should be in some fields may currently form part of the entries in another. The index is available on the BGS website via the Geoindex

  • Sometimes known as the "One-Inch Collection", this is an archival collection of rock samples collected by BGS field staff during surveys within England and Wales, arranged by 1-inch (or 50 K) scale BGS geological map sheet area. It was intended as a representative suite of the lithologies present in each sheet, although this was only partially achieved. Documentation is via archive of rock sample collection sheets (see COLLECTIONSHEETS) but is poorly coordinated at present.

  • The GeoSure datasets and related reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement due to six types of natural geological hazard, in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMapGB-50 (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to show running sand behaviour under the action of flowing water, a characteristic usually of saturated sand and silt grade material. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to compress under an applied load, a characteristic usually of superficial deposits such as peat or alluvium. Some types of ground may contain layers of very soft materials like clay or peat. These may compress if loaded by overlying structures, or if the groundwater level changes, potentially resulting in depression of the ground and disturbance of foundations. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of slope instability. Landslide hazard occurs due to particular slope characteristics (such as geology, gradient, sources of water, drainage, man-made constructions) combining to cause the slope to become unstable. Downslope movement of materials, such as a landslide or rockfall may lead to a loss of support and damage to buildings. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1**The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings. This data is available as vector data, 25m gridded data or alternatively linked to a postcode database – the Derived Postcode Database. A series of GIS (Geographical Information System) maps show the most significant hazard areas. The ground movement, or subsidence, hazards included are landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product uses the individual GeoSure data layers and evaluates them using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The Derived Postcode Database (DPD) contains generalised information at a postcode level. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. It is available as a GIS point dataset or a text (.txt) file format. The DPD contains a normalised hazard rating for each of the 6 GeoSure themes hazards (i.e. each GeoSure theme has been balanced against each other) and a combined unified hazard rating for each postcode in Great Britain. The combined hazard rating for each postcode is available as a standalone product. The Derived Postcode Database is available in a point data format or text file format. It is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset has been created as vector data but is also available as a raster grid. This data is available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo coverage’s and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution. This dataset has been specifically developed for the insurance of low-rise buildings. The GeoSure datasets have been developed to identify the potential hazard for low-rise buildings and those with shallow foundations of less than 2 m deep. The identification of ground instability and other geological hazards can assist regional planners; rapidly identifying areas with potential problems and aid local government offices in making development plans by helping to define land suited to different uses. Other users of these data may include developers, homeowners, solicitors, loss adjusters, the insurance industry, architects and surveyors. Version 7 released June 2015.

  • The BGS groundwater levels dataset is a gridded interpolation of depth to groundwater. The dataset is a raster grid, with 50 × 50 metre pixels holding values that represent the probable maximum depth, in metres, to the phreatic water table. This represents the likely lowest water level, under natural conditions, in an open well or borehole drilled into the uppermost parts of a rock unit. The dataset has been modelled from topography and hydrology, assuming that surface water and groundwater are hydraulically connected. It has not used observations of groundwater level in wells or boreholes directly, but they have been used to validate its performance.

  • The map shows the localities where samples that form part of the BGS rock collections have been taken. Many of these samples are from surface exposure, and were collected by BGS geologists during the course of geological mapping programmes. Others are from onshore boreholes or from mine and quarry workings. The principal collections are the E (England and Wales), S (Scotland), N (continuation of the S collection) and the MR (miscellaneous). The collections, which are held at the BGS offices at Keyworth (Nottingham) and Edinburgh, comprise both hand specimens and thin sections, although in individual samples either may not be immediately available. Users may also note that the BGS holds major collections of borehole cores and hand specimens as well as over a million palaeontological samples. The Britrocks database provides an index to these collections. With over 120,000 records, it now holds data for some 70% of the entire collections, including the UK samples shown in this application as well as rocks from overseas locations and reference minerals. The collections are continuously being added to and sample records from archived registers are also being copied into the electronic database. Map coverage is thin in some areas where copying from original paper registers has not been completed. Further information on Britrocks samples in these and other areas can be obtained from the Chief Curator at the BGS Keyworth (Nottingham) office or from the rock curator at the BGS Murchison House (Edinburgh) office.