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  • This dataset contains carbon dioxide and methane measurements from the Little Plumpton site. British Geological Survey (BGS), the universities of Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester and York and partners from Public Health England (PHE) and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), are conducting an independent environmental baseline monitoring programme near Kirby Misperton, North Yorkshire and Little Plumpton, Lancashire. These are areas where planning permission has been granted for hydraulic fracturing.” The monitoring allows the characterisation of the environmental baseline before any hydraulic fracturing and gas exploration or production takes place in the event that planning permission is granted. The investigations are independent of any monitoring carried out by the industry or the regulators, and information collected from the programme will be made freely available to the public. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you use these data, please note the requirement to acknowledge use. Use of data and information from the project: "Science-based environmental baseline monitoring associated with shale gas development in the Vale of Pickering, Yorkshire (including supplementary air quality monitoring in Lancashire)", led by the British Geological Survey Permission for reproduction of data accessed from the CEDA website is granted subject to inclusion of the following acknowledgement: "These data were produced by the Universities of Manchester and York (National Centre for Atmospheric Science) in a collaboration with the British Geological Survey and partners from the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Liverpool and Public Health England, undertaking a project grant-funded by the Department for Energy & Climate Change (DECC), 2015-2016. " ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • This dataset contains carbon dioxide and methane measurements from the Kirby Misperton site. British Geological Survey (BGS), the universities of Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester and York and partners from Public Health England (PHE) and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), are conducting an independent environmental baseline monitoring programme near Kirby Misperton, North Yorkshire and Little Plumpton, Lancashire. These are areas where planning permission has been granted for hydraulic fracturing. The monitoring allows the characterisation of the environmental baseline before any hydraulic fracturing and gas exploration or production takes place in the event that planning permission is granted. The investigations are independent of any monitoring carried out by the industry or the regulators, and information collected from the programme will be made freely available to the public. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you use these data, please note the requirement to acknowledge use. Use of data and information from the project: "Science-based environmental baseline monitoring associated with shale gas development in the Vale of Pickering, Yorkshire (including supplementary air quality monitoring in Lancashire)", led by the British Geological Survey Permission for reproduction of data accessed from the CEDA website is granted subject to inclusion of the following acknowledgement: "These data were produced by the Universities of Manchester and York (National Centre for Atmospheric Science) in a collaboration with the British Geological Survey and partners from the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Liverpool and Public Health England, undertaking a project grant-funded by the Department for Energy & Climate Change (DECC), 2015-2016. " ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • The data consists of nitrogen (N) offtake, N emissions and soil N parameters, and herbage quality parameters from a three-cut silage plot trial located at two grassland sites within the UK collected between April and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon and Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales. At each site measurements were taken from 16 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design. Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed, all parameters measured were following a fertiliser application. Nitrogen parameters measured were crude protein (CP) of herbage, ammonia (NH3) emissions, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and soil ammonium (NH4) and nitrate (NO3). Herbage quality parameters measured were dry matter, acid-digestible fibre (ADF), ash, CP, metabolizable energy (ME), and non-digestible fibre (NDF) and digestibility (D) was calculated. Nitrogen offtake, losses and fluxes were measured to determine the N use efficiency and the economic viability of different N fertilisers. Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences – North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project "UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy". Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c7d4b3c-88f7-43ab-a50f-b6804474e568