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Land Use

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  • This view shows a 1km resolution raster version of the Land Cover Map 2007 for Great Britain. The data consists of 23 bands. Each band represents a target class, broadly representing a Broad Habitat, and within the band each 1km pixel represents a percentage cover value of that class. The dataset is part of a series of data products produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology known as LCM2007. LCM2007 is a parcel-based thematic classification of satellite image data covering the entire United Kingdom. The map updates and upgrades the Land Cover Map of Great Britain (LCMGB) 1990 and LCM2000. Like the earlier 1990 and 2000 products, LCM2007 is derived from a computer classification of satellite scenes obtained mainly from Landsat, IRS and SPOT sensors and also incorporates information derived from other ancillary datasets. LCM2007 was classified using a nomenclature corresponding to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompasses the entire range of UK habitats. In addition, it recorded further detail where possible. The series of LCM2007 products includes vector and raster formats, with a number of different versions containing varying levels of detail and at different spatial resolutions.

  • This data contains values of bare sand area, modelled wind speed, aspect and slope at a 2.5 m spatial resolution for four UK coastal dune fields, Abberfraw (Wales), Ainsdale (England), Morfa Dyffryn (Wales), Penhale (England). Data is stored as a .csv file. Data is available for 620,756.25 m2 of dune at Abberfraw, 550,962.5 m2 of dune at Ainsdale, 1,797,756.25 m2 of dune at Morfa Dyffryn and 2,275,056.25 m2 of dune at Penhale. All values were calculated from aerial imagery and digital terrain models collected between 2014 and 2016. For each location, areas of bare sand were mapped in QGIS using the semi-automatic classification plugin (SCP) and the minimum distance algorithm on true-colour RGB images. The slope and aspect of the dune surface at each site was calculated in QGIS from digital terrain models. Wind speed at 0.4 m above the surface of the digital terrain model at each site was calculated using a steady state computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Data was collected to statistically test the relationship between bare sand and three abiotic physical factors on coastal dunes (wind speed, dune slope and dune slope aspect). Vertical aerial imagery was sourced from EDINA Aerial Digimap Service and digital terrain models from EDINA LIDAR Digimap Service. Wind speed data was generated and interpreted by Dr Thomas Smyth (University of Huddersfield). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/972599af-0cc3-4e0e-a4dc-2fab7a6dfc85

  • The dataset contains chemistry data from streambed porewater (10 and 20 cm) and surface water, as well as nitrogen chemistry data at 2.5 cm resolution within the upper 15 cm of the streambed. The dataset includes concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and nitrous oxide, and isotopic ratios of δ13CCO2, δ15NNO3+NO2 and δ18ONO3+NO2. Also included are measurements of dissolved oxygen and temperature. Samples were collected from three reaches within the stream, an upstream sandy reach, a mid-stream sandy reach and a downstream gravel reach. The work was carried out with Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funding through a PhD (NERC award number 1602135), grant (NE/L004437/1) and Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry Facility grant (CEH_L102_05_2016). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/00601260-285e-4ffa-b381-340b51a7ec50

  • The dataset contains model output from an agricultural land use model at kilometre scale resolution over Great Britain (GB) for four different climate and policy scenarios. Specifically, arable area is modelled for with or without a climate tipping point (standard (medium emissions scenario SRES-A1B) climate change vs Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) collapse) and with or without widespread irrigation use for farmers from 2000 to 2089. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e1c1dbcf-2f37-429b-af19-a730f98600f6

  • This dataset shows potential carbon storage as modelled for the urban areas of Milton Keynes/Newport Pagnell, Bedford, and Luton/Dunstable, UK. The modelling approach used the ‘InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs) 3.1.0’ ecosystem service model suite, raster land cover maps at two spatial resolutions (5 m and 25 m) and published literature values for carbon storage by land cover. The resulting data are presented in the form of two ‘GeoTIFF’ raster map files (and associated metadata and spatial information files required by software) that can be viewed and manipulated in Geographic Information Software. The units are kg C per square meter. The purpose of the modelling was to help assess and visualise the value that urban green space represents to urban residents and natural systems in just one of many ecosystem services. This research was conducted as part of the larger 'Fragments, Functions, Flows and Urban Ecosystem Services' (F3UES) programme. Detailed methods and results of this analysis are published in: Grafius DR, Corstanje R, Warren PH, et al (2016) The impact of land use/land cover scale on modelling urban ecosystem services. Landsc Ecol 31:1509–1522. doi: 10.1007/s10980-015-0337-7. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9209af2c-24f6-4e37-98fe-550032e97a2c

  • The data describes future land use projections at 1 km^2 resolution developed by CRAFTY-GB. For each of six Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSP-RCP) scenarios, gridded land use maps for Great Britain are provided, each as a stacked raster file with seven bands representing land use at each decadal timestep, from 2020 to 2080. CRAFTY-GB is a new agent-based model of the British land system operating at a 1 km^2 resolution and based on a broad range of available land system data . The model is based on linked UK-RCP climate scenarios and UK-SSPs socio-economic pathway (SSP) scenarios, based on global SSPs developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It extrapolates the impact of these on the British Land system at decadal timesteps from 2020-2080. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f9ab3051-4f85-415f-b691-371ff8e951f2

  • Hydrological monitoring data in this data collection result from dipwells installed at studied flood defence scheme, where electronic gauges monitored water-table fluctuations over time. Ecological data contain species sighting records of birds, butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies recorded during site visits to flood defence schemes in summer 2007. These data aim to show the relationship between water regimes and habitat potential.The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. Agricultural Flood Defence Schemes in floodplain and coastal areas were once an important element of Government support for farmers in Britain. More recently, however, changing priorities in the countryside, concern about environmental quality and perceptions of increased flood risk in lowland areas, in part linked to climate change, have promoted a re-appraisal of land management options and policies for floodplain areas. Eight agricultural flood defence schemes, previously studied by the research team in the 1980s, have been re-examined to identify and explain changes in land and water management that have occurred over the last 40-years. This involved stakeholder and institutional analysis, farmer interviews, ecological surveys, field observations and modelling of hydrological and related ecological processes. Generic land use scenarios have been developed to consider management options that focus on single objectives, such as maximising agricultural production, maximising biodiversity and minimising flood risk in the catchment. The scenarios examined the impacts of changes in rural land use on ecosystem goods and services. The influence of agricultural policy, interacting with farmer circumstances and motivation, on land use has also been explored. The project also evaluated the impacts of the summer 2007 floods on agriculture and rural communities. The results revealed opportunities for achieving a wide range of benefits relating to farming, biodiversity, amenity, flood management, water quality and the wider rural economy. The study informed strategies for floodplain management, helping to develop approaches that are appealing to major stakeholders. Historical data on the studied flood defence schemes, farm business survey data and interviews with farmers at flood defence schemes, and interviews with farmers and rural businesses affected by summer floods in 2007 are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6377 (see related resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • This data set consists of various hydrological measurements taken over two years of instrumental monitoring in fields of willow and Miscanthus crops from a study as part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. Future policies are likely to encourage more land use under energy crops: principally willow, grown as short rotation coppice, and a tall exotic grass Miscanthus. These crops will contribute to the UK's commitment to reduce CO2 emissions. However, it is not clear how decisions about appropriate areas for growing the crops, based on climate, soil and water, should be balanced against impacts on the landscape, social acceptance, biodiversity and the rural economy. This project integrated social, economic, hydrology and biodiversity studies in an interdisciplinary approach to assessing the impact of converting land to Miscanthus grass and short-rotation coppice (SRC) willows. Two contrasting farming systems were focused on: the arable-dominated East Midlands; and grassland-dominated South West England. This data set consists of various hydrological measurements taken over two years of instrumental monitoring in fields of both crops. GIS and biodiversity survey datasets are also available. The public attidues questionnaire data from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6615 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • This dataset consists of palaeoecological measurements taken at sites in the Peak District and NW Sutherland during the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. This data collection includes the results from four interlinked projects combining quantitative and qualitative evidence to assess long-term ecological data at local to national levels: Project 1 synthesises existing information on historical environmental changes in the uplands with relevance to current management and policy Project 2 used high resolution palaeoenvironmental analyses to reconstruct ecological changes and land-use histories of four contrasting moorland systems in the Peak District (England) over the last c.200-1300 yrs. Sites were selected in consultation with stakeholders and the results provide the basis for comparison with ecological survey results and knowledge of current managers. Project 3 used similar methods to reconstruct ecological and land-use changes in NW Sutherland (Scotland) over the last c.400 yrs. Site selection was based on discussion with stakeholders and results were compared with stakeholder knowledge and preferences for landscape change. Project 4 used three choice experiments to assess the response of different communities to long-term evidence as a potential source of information to inform preferences for upland management. Project 4a used a choice experiment to assess the influence of long-term evidence on management preferences of residents of the Peak District. Project 4b used choice experiments to present long-term evidence to ecologists from government, NGO, research and practitioner communities in conjunction with established sources of ecological evidence used in upland management (ecological monitoring and ecological research) and with stakeholder preferences for upland management, since this is increasingly becoming embedded in decision-making. The upland woods and peatlands were used as the contexts for two choice experiments. This dataset consists of palaeoecological measurements taken at sites in the Peak District and NW Sutherland, as part of projects 2 and 3 as listed above. The choice experiment data from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6791 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • The study is part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. This project investigated the links between quality food production and biodiversity protection by asking the question: can production systems that use and maintain biodiverse natural grasslands, translate that into a source of additional product value in the production of meat and cheese and therefore benefit rural economies? The aim was to inverse the conventional understanding of landscape or environmental quality as the outcome of well managed farming to explore the idea of natural grassland biodiversity as an input into more sustainable farming and as an integral component of product quality. This dataset consists of the grassland botanical composition and chemical soil analyses resulting from this project. A botanical field survey of a number of sample grazing sites on selected case study farms records the plant species present within a representative area of phytosociologically homogeneous vegetation and the percentage cover that each species vertically projects onto the ground surface. Soil analyses of sample sites determines soil composition, pH and minerals. Land management, consumer opinion and nutritional data from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6159 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).