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  • This data set describes the prevalence of trypanosomes and Sodalis glossinidius, and host blood meal analysis from tsetse flies (Glossina morsitans morsitans) captured during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. The Luangwa Valley in Zambia is an old focus of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) and sporadic outbreaks have continued to occur in the human population. In recent years there has been an influx of people migrating from the densely populated plateau region resulting in a significant change in land-use in the study area, potentially influencing tsetse dynamics and the epidemiology of HAT. This data set was collected to monitor infection rates of trypanosomes and Sodalis glossinidius in Glossina morsitans morsitans tsetse flies in the area so as to assess the risk posed to both human and livestock populations. In addition, feeding patterns of tsetse were investigated through analysis of blood meals. This work was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and contributed to the Zambia trypanosomiasis case study. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a55eea77-8401-49ba-921e-53e085dc8345

  • This resource contains tsetse fly count data recorded during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. Tsetse sampling was conducted along a 60 kilometre transect from the plateau region on the eastern side of the Luangwa Valley to the floor of the valley, near Mfuwe Airport. Tsetse flies were sampled using black screen fly rounds. The first survey was conducted in May and June (cold, dry season) and the second survey in November (hot dry season). The Luangwa Valley in Zambia is an old focus of human sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) and sporadic outbreaks have occurred in the human population. In recent years there has been an influx of people migrating from the densely populated plateau region resulting in a significant change in land-use in the study area, potentially influencing the distribution and density of tsetse. This work was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and contributed to the Zambia trypanosomiasis case study. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59fc6e1a-e1cb-4bcf-8b49-68211b2a363a

  • The dataset describes the results of a laboratory analysis investigating the presence of various infectious agents in goats, cattle, pigs, dogs and sheep from Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia. Blood samples were collected in June, July and August 2013 and stored on Whatman FTA (Flinders Technology Associates) cards. Laboratory analysis was conducted using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) for African trypanosomes and tick-borne infections. In addition, serum was tested for Brucella using the Rose Bengal test. Cattle and dogs were tested for African trypanosomes, tick-borne infections and Brucella. Goats and sheep were tested for African trypanosomes and Brucella. Pigs were tested for African trypanosomes only. The objective was to evaluate the health status of domestic animals in the Mambwe District. This work was conducted alongside a human wellbeing questionnaire survey. The research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f81ede76-a1d4-4367-aa8c-de087350457e