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  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The contaminants and biological effects in biota data start in 1987 with greater use of the database occurring from 1997 onwards. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).

  • This dataset includes high-definition video imagery, hydrographic and navigation data from the Isis remotely operated vehicle (ROV). These data were then used to perform a biometric and reproductive analysis on Kiwa tyleri sp. which also forms part of the dataset. Four hydrothermal vent and cold seep sites were sampled during thirty one ROV dives: south of Bird Island on the South Georgia shelf, the E2 and E9 segments of the East Scotia Ridge, and the Kemp Seamount. The dives were undertaken between 10th January 2010 and 12th February 2010 during the RRS James Cook research cruise JC042 (7th January - 24th February 2010). The Isis ROV was equipped with a high-definition video camera, a CTD package, an Ultra Short Baseline navigation system and a suction sampler. The data were produced as part of the NERC Consortium Grant project Chemosynthetic Ecosystems in the Southern Ocean (ChEsSo), which funded a total of four cruises (JR224, JC042, JC055 and JC080). The dataset contributed to the project aims to search for, identify and intensively study hydrothermal vent and cold seep sites in the eastern Scotia Sea. The existing dataset was produced by scientists from the University of Southampton and technicians from the National Oceanography Centre. Additional data for these cruises may become available in the future. Please note that the access restrictions for video imagery, hydrographic and navigation data are currently unknown. The biometric and reproductive analysis data are unrestricted and accessible through the Published Data Library.

  • This dataset consists of measurements of water column structure including hydrographic profiles, temperature and salinity, turbulence data, turbidity and fluorescence profiles, current velocities and sound velocities. The measurements were undertaken during a comprehensive survey of the southern Celtic Sea between May and August 2012. Some turbulence microstructure data were collected from the 14th to the 24th of May 2012, while the remaining data were collected from the 10th to the 22nd of August 2012, with the use of the RV Falcon Spirit. These cruises formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "Assessing the sensitivity of marginally stratified shelf seas within a changing climate". The data were collected in order to identify processes involved in the existence and intensity of the front displays not governed by tidal periodicities, to test whether the processes identified as important to changes in shelf sea stratification through in-situ measurements are indeed responsible for observed changes and to incorporate knew knowledge into state of the art numerical models that can up-scale the processes observed within this project to the shelf sea environment. The Discovery Science project was composed of Standard Grant reference NE/I001832/1. The project ran from 01 January 2011 to 30 June 2014. Dr Philip Hosegood of University of Plymouth School of Marine Science and Engineering was the principal investigator of this project. The moored temperature logger data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RV Falcon Spirit, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and can be downloaded on-line from the BODC website in a variety of data formats including ASCII, ODV and NetCDF. Full documentation on the dataset is supplied on download. Raw file versions of the minibat towed undulator transect data, moored ADCP data, VMADCP data and turbulence microstructure data are available on request.

  • The Carbon Uptake and Seasonal Traits in Antarctic Remineralisation Depth (CUSTARD) data set comprises hydrographic data, including measurements of temperature, salinity and currents, complemented by bathymetric, meteorological and nutrient data. All the observational data from the project were collected at, and south of, the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Global Southern Ocean Array, located south-west of Chile. Data collection activities span from November 2018 to January 2020 over 3 cruises (DY096, DY111 and DY112). The main aim of the CUSTARD project is to quantify the seasonal drivers of carbon fluxes in a region of the Southern Ocean upper limb, and estimate how long different quantities of carbon are kept out of the atmosphere based on the water flow routes at the observed remineralisation depths. The lead grant was funded by the NERC grant reference NE/P021247/1 with child grants NE/P021328/1, NE/P021336/1, NE/P021263/1. NE/P021247/1 was held at the National Oceanography Centre, led by Adrian Martin. Child grants were lead by Mark Moore of University of Southampton, Simon Ussher of University of Plymouth and Dorothee Bakker of University of East Anglia respectively.

  • This dataset consists of underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography measurements from cruise JC044 and JC082 as well as 7 CTD casts for cruise JC082. Data were collected on two RRS James Cook cruises, JC044 and JC082, covering the Cayman Trough and Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre in the Caribbean Sea. Cruise JC044 took place between March 25th and April 22nd 2010 and cruise JC082 took place between February 6th and March 8th 2013. Navigation data were collected using an Applanix POSMV system and meteorology and sea surface hydrography were collected using the NMF Surfmet system. Both systems were run through the duration of the cruise, excepting times for cleaning, entering and leaving port, and while alongside. CTD data were obtained from a Seabird SBE CTD system fitted to a rosette and launched at stations along the cruise track. Data were collected as part of the NERC-funded project “Hydrothermal activity and deep-ocean biology of the Mid-Cayman Rise” which aimed to investigate the world's deepest under-sea volcanic ridge, the Mid-Cayman Rise, to advance understanding of patterns of biodiversity in the planet's largest ecosystem. By studying the geology and hydrography of the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre using established techniques, the project aimed to confirm the geological processes driving the vents and to reveal the evolutionary genetic relationships of their inhabitants to those in vents elsewhere. The project was funded by two NERC standard grants. The lead grant, NE/F017774/1, ran from 15 September 2009 to 01 March 2014, and was led by principal investigator Dr Jonathan TP Copley of University of Southampton, School of Ocean and Earth Sciences. The child grant, NE/F017758/1, ran from 19 July 2009 to 31 December 2013, and was led by Dr BJ Morton of National Oceanography Centre, Science and Technology. Underway navigation, meteorology and sea surface hydrography and CTD datasets have been received as raw files by BODC and are available upon request.

  • This dataset contains hydrographic profiles (temperature, salinity, oxygen, fluorometer, transmissometer, irradiance) and along track measurements (bathymetry, surface meteorology, sea surface hydrography), with discrete measurements including water chemistry (organic and inorganic nutrients, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, dissolved gases, trace metals) collected from a hydrographic section in the North Atlantic Ocean. This hydrographic section, designated A05 by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), runs along a nominal latitude of 24.5N between Florida and either Spain, North Africa, Portugal or the Canary Islands. Four UK cruises (D279, D346, DY040 and JC191) have contributed to this dataset to date using CTD casts, vessel-mounted and lowered ADCPs, bottle sampling and meteorological measuring systems to collect data. The measurements were collected as one of the UK's contributions to the Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP) and with the aim of contributing to the study of decadal variability of the present ocean circulation and meridional transport of heat, freshwater and biogeochemistry, as part of the Climate Linked Atlantic Sector Science (CLASS) project. The work was led by teams from the National Oceanography Centre at Southampton. Data from the section are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).

  • The Marine Environment Monitoring and Assessment National database (MERMAN) is a national database which holds and provides access to data collected under the Clean Safe Seas Environmental Monitoring Programme (CSEMP) formerly the National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). The data collected are the responsibility of the Competent Monitoring Authorities (CMAs) who collect the samples from stations in UK waters using water sampling techniques, trawls, nets or grabs. The CMAs then send the collected samples to accredited laboratories where they are analysed. A weighting is calculated, based on the quality of the analysis. The weighting score incorporates the laboratory accreditation, reference material, inter-laboratory comparisons, detection limits, uncertainties and standard deviations. Where data do not meet a threshold score they are given a status of ‘FAIL’ and although they are stored they are not made available to external users. The MERMAN contaminants, nutrients, biological and eutrophication effects in water data start in 1999. Data are submitted by the CMAs annually and an annual submission may include updates to legacy data to provide additional data or improve data/metadata. The data held in MERMAN fulfils the UK's mandatory monitoring requirements under the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPAR) Joint Assessments and Monitoring Programme (JAMP). These data are used in support of European Commission (EC) directives and national assessments, such as Charting Progress 2 and are also supplied to the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET).

  • The dataset comprises 23 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the South East and West Atlantic Ocean (limit 20W) area specifically the Fimbul Ice Shelf and the Weddell Sea around Filchner Depression during February and March 2005. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the British Antarctic Survey as part of the Autosub Under Ice (AUI) project.

  • The dataset comprises 125 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, during September - October 1999 in the North East Atlantic Ocean between Iceland and Scotland A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Southampton Oceanography Centre.

  • This dataset consists of a hydrographic, biogeochemical and meteorological data. Hydrographic profiles, underway measurements and point sources provided information on the water column structure including temperature, salinity and fluorescence. The biogeochemical water sampling programme provided details on nutrients. Meteorological parameters were measured across the study area. Data collection was undertaken in the Arctic Sea. The data were collected during the period 15 - 31 March 2013 during RV Lance ACCACIA cruise and from 13 July - 16 August 2013 during RRS James Clark Ross JR20130713 (JR288) cruise. Measurements were taken using a variety of instrumentation, including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, water bottle samplers, fluorometers, grabs and ship flow-through and meteorological packages. The data have been collected as part of the United Kingdom (UK) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Arctic Research Programme (ACCACIA project) to provide information on how aerosol concentration levels change with the seasons and the extent of sea-ice cover. This will help improve modelling of the global climate system and predictions for future climatic change, as well as immediate weather forecasts for mid-to-high latitude locations. Both cruises were undertaken by the University of York- Department Of Chemistry in collaboration with the University of Manchester, University of Leeds, University of Oxford, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, University of Essex, Bangor University and British Antarctic Survey. The Principal Scientist during the first research cruise was James Lee (University of York) and on the second cruise Lucy Carpenter and Rosie Chance, also from the University of York. The Principal Investigator for this project is Ian Brooks (University of Leeds). CTD data, temperature logger data, nutrient data, ship underway monitoring system data and trace gases concentrations in the water and air are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other data have not yet been supplied or have been supplied to the British Atmospheric Data Centre.