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  • The BGS Permeability data product shows estimated rates of water movement from the ground surface to the water table. BGS Permeability version 8 incorporates the latest geology mapping (BGS Geology 50k). This includes updates to the lithology-coding schema, the LEX_RCS. A 2-part code used to identify the named rock unit from the BGS lexicon of named rock units (LEX) followed by a Rock Classification Scheme (RCS) code which describes the rocks lithological characteristics e.g. texture and composition. Updates to these codes and latest dissolution hazard data sourced from BGS GeoSure: Soluble Rocks have been reviewed and classified as part of the version 8 release. The product covers Great Britain and is presented at a scale of 1:50 000, based on the geological data at the same scale. However, in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale is used. The BGS Permeability data product can be used to compare the relative permeability of deposits at the regional scale, indicating where highly permeable rocks could allow rapid infiltration to occur, or where less permeable rocks are present and water could pond on the ground surface. The dataset can be used as a component in a wide range of geo-environmental assessments such as natural flood management, Sustainable Drainage Systems, engineering desk studies, slope stability, and aquifer vulnerability. It is for use at the regional scale and is not recommended for use at the site-specific scale.

  • Data for NERC grant NE/L000660/1. This is the data supporting Fig. 4 of the publication: Ebigbo, A., Lang, P. S., Paluszny, A., and Zimmerman, R. W. (2016). Inclusion-based effective medium models for the permeability of a 3D fractured rock mass. Transport In Porous Media, DOI: 10.1007/s11242-016-0685-z. It contains numerically computed permeabilities for various realisations of fracture networks. There are six different cases (as explained in the paper).

  • The data comprises a GIS layers representing the permeability of Superficial geological deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale, 1:625:000, is used. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises GIS layers representing the permeability of mass movement deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000,. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through mass movement deposits and the ability of a unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises a GIS layer representing the permeability of bedrock for Great Britain The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, 1:250,000 data are. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises four GIS layers representing the permeability of geological deposits for Great Britain (bedrock, superficial, artificial and mass movement deposits). The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale is used. For bedrock deposits this is 1:250,000 and for superficial deposits this is 1:625:000. Artificial ground and mass movement deposits have not been mapped beyond 1:50,000. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The data comprises GIS layers representing the permeability of artificial deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through these deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The permeability of single fractures, pairs of conjugate fracture pairs, and 256 fracture networks, is numerically computed using a multi-scale permeability method. For fracture networks, the geometries of the files are contained in 3dm files. The results are presented in a series of json text files. The method to compute permeabilities is described in the PhD thesis entitled "Multi-scale modelling of thermohydro-mechanical-chemical processes in fractured rocks" by Philipp Lang, Imperial College London, supervised by Adriana Paluszny and Robert W. Zimmerman.

  • The images in this dataset are a sample of Doddington Sandstone from a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scan acquired with a voxel resolution of 4.2µm. This dataset is part of a study on the effects of Voxel Resolution in a study of flow in porous media. A brief overview of this study summarised from Shah et al 2015 follows. A fundamental understanding of flow in porous media at the pore-scale is necessary to be able to upscale average displacement processes from core to reservoir scale. The study of fluid flow in porous media at the pore-scale consists of two key procedures: Imaging reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) pore space images; and modelling such as with single and two-phase flow simulations with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) or Pore-Network (PN) Modelling. Here we analyse pore-scale results to predict petrophysical properties such as porosity, single phase permeability and multi-phase properties at different length scales. The fundamental issue is to understand the image resolution dependency of transport properties, in order to up-scale the flow physics from pore to core scale. In this work, we use a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanner to image and reconstruct three dimensional pore-scale images of five sandstones and five complex carbonates at four different voxel resolutions (4.4µm, 6.2µm, 8.3µm and 10.2µm, scanning the same physical field of view. S.M.Shah, F. Gray, J.P. Crawshaw and E.S. Boek, 2015. Micro-Computed Tomography pore-scale study of flow in porous media: Effect of Voxel Resolution. Advances in Water Resources July 2015 doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2015.07.012 We gratefully acknowledge permission to publish and funding from the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC), provided jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell, and Qatar Science & Technology Park. Qatar Petroleum remain copyright owner.

  • We imaged the steady-state flow of brine and decane at different fractional flows during dual injection in a micro-porous limestone using X-ray micro-tomography. We applied differential imaging on Estaillades carbonate to (a) distinguish micro-porous regions from macro-pores, and (b) determine fluid phase pore occupancy and relative permeability at a capillary number, Ca = 7.3×10-6. The sample porosity was approximately 28 %, with 7% in macro-pores and 21% in pores that could not be directly resolved (micro-porosity). We find that, in addition to brine and decane, a fraction of the macroscopic pore space contains an intermittent phase, which is occupied either by brine or oil during the hour-long scan time. Furthermore, fluid occupancy in micro-porosity was classified into three sub-phases: micro-pore space with oil, micro-pore space with brine, and micro pores partially filled with oil and brine.