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  • The research team collected data on soil-atmosphere exchange of trace gases and environmental variables during four field campaigns (two wet seasons, two dry seasons) the lowland tropical peatland forests of the Pastaza-Marañón foreland basin in Peru. The campaigns took place over a 27 month period, extending from February 2012 to May 2014. This dataset contains measurements from field sampling of soil-atmosphere fluxes concentrated on 4 dominant vegetation types in the lowland tropical peatland forests of the Pastaza-Marañón foreland basin. Vegetation types included; forested vegetation, forested [short pole] vegetation, Mauritia flexuosa-dominated palm swamp, and mixed palm swamp. They were measured at 5 different sites in Peru including; Buena Vista, Miraflores, San Jorge, Quistococha, and Charo. Greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes were captured from both floodplain systems and nutrient-poor bogs in order to account for underlying differences in biogeochemistry that may arise from variations in hydrology. Parameters include methane and nitrous oxide fluxes, air/soil temperatures, soil pH, soil electrical conductivity, soil dissolved oxygen content, and water table depth. See documentation and data lineage for data quality. These data were collected in support of the NERC project: Amazonian peatlands - A potentially important but poorly characterised source of atmospheric methane and nitrous oxide (NE/I015469/2)

  • 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide?' was a NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) funded project from 2010-2015 with the following grant references NE/H007849/1, NE/H006753/1 and NE/H006583/2. This dataset collection contains in-situ ground based soil-atmosphere flux and soil condition measurements from 4 different ecosystems located in the Peruvian Andes over ~2.5 years between 2010-2013. The ecosystems included upper montane forest (Wayqecha), lower montane forest (San Pedro), premontane forest (Villa Carmen) and grassland sites. At present, data are only available for 3 ecosystems; Wayqecha, San Pedro and Villa Carman. However, the grassland dataset will follow shortly along with some model output.

  • 'Amazonian peatlands - A potentially important but poorly characterised source of atmospheric methane and nitrous oxide' was a NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) funded project from 2013-2014 with the following grant reference: NE/I015469/2. This dataset collection contains measurements from field sampling of soil-atmosphere fluxes concentrated on 4 dominant vegetation types in the lowland tropical peatland forests of the Pastaza-Marañón foreland basin. Vegetation types included; forested vegetation, forested [short pole] vegetation, Mauritia flexuosa-dominated palm swamp, and mixed palm swamp. Greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes were captured from both floodplain systems and nutrient-poor bogs in order to account for underlying differences in biogeochemistry that may arise from variations in hydrology. Sampling was conducted during four field campaigns (two wet season, two dry season) over a 27-month period, extending from February 2012 to May 2014.

  • The dataset contains concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide which were collected in discrete air samples between 15th December 2010 and 6th July 2013 by the University of St Andrews Thermo TRACE Gas Chromatograph Ultra at San Pedro, a lower montane forest ecosystem ground site, in the Peruvian Andes. Data were collected for the NERC project: 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide?' (NERC grant awards: NE/H007849/1, NE/H006753/1 and NE/H006583/2).

  • The dataset contains concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide which were collected in discrete air samples between 17th December 2010 and 5th July 2013 by the University of St Andrews Thermo TRACE Gas Chromatograph Ultra at Wayqecha, an upper montane forest ecosystem ground site, in the Peruvian Andes. Data were collected tor the NERC project: 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide?' (NERC grant awards: NE/H007849/1, NE/H006753/1 and NE/H006583/2).

  • The dataset contains concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane which were collected in discrete air samples during intensive seasonal campaigns in November 2011 and August 2012 by the University of St Andrews Thermo TRACE Gas Chromatograph Ultra at Tres Cruces, a montane grassland ecosystem ground site, in the Peruvian Andes. Data were collected for the NERC project: 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide?' (NERC grant awards: NE/H007849/1, NE/H006753/1 and NE/H006583/2).

  • The dataset contains concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide which were collected in discrete air samples between 5th January 2011 and 4th July 2013 by the University of Aberdeen Thermo TRACE Gas Chromatograph Ultra at Tres Cruces, a montane grassland ecosystem ground site, in the Peruvian Andes. Data were collected for the NERC project: 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide?' (NERC grant awards: NE/H007849/1, NE/H006753/1 and NE/H006583/2).

  • The dataset contains concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide which were collected in discrete air samples between 23rd July 2011 and 8th July 2013 by the University of St Andrews Thermo TRACE Gas Chromatograph Ultra at Villa Carmen, a premontane forest ecosystem ground site, in the Peruvian Andes. Data were collected for the NERC project: 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide?' (NERC grant awards: NE/H007849/1, NE/H006753/1 and NE/H006583/2).

  • Precipitation and near-surface temperature data from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5 models) are statistically downscaled to create these gridded datasets over the Rio Santa River Basin (in the Cordillera Blanca; d02) and the Vilcanota-Urubamba region (d03) at 4 km horizontal resolution, from 2019-2100. The bias-corrected WRF data found in the related dataset are used as the observational truth for the historical period 1980-2018, and the data are downscaled using an empirical quantile mapping technique. Two representative concentration pathways (RCP) have been downscaled, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5, from 30 CMIP5 models. The daily total precipitation and daily minimum and maximum temperature at 2 m are downscaled, and the daily average and monthly average temperatures are calculated using the hourly temperature (not archived due to space constraints). The potential evapotranspiration is estimated from the downscaled precipitation and temperature data, using the Hargreaves equation. These data were corrected as part of the PEGASUS (Producing EnerGy and preventing hAzards from SUrface water Storage in Peru) and Peru GROWS (Peruvian Glacier Retreat and its Impact on Water Security) projects. The datasets were created to assess future climate in the Peruvian Andes, as a basis to determine future climate in the region, and as an input for glaciological and hydrological models. The data were created on the JASMIN supercomputer. The creation of this data was conducted under the Peru GROWS and PEGASUS projects, which were both funded by NERC (grants NE/S013296/1 and NE/S013318/1, respectively) and CONCYTEC through the Newton-Paulet Fund. The Peruvian part of the Peru GROWS project was conducted within the framework of the call E031-2018-01-NERC "Glacier Research Circles", through its executing unit FONDECYT (Contract No. 08-2019-FONDECYT).

  • Temperature and precipitation data from the Weather Research and Forecasting model are bias-corrected against observations to create these bias-corrected gridded datasets over the Rio Santa River Basin (in the Cordillera Blanca) at 4 km horizontal resolution (d02), the Vilcanota-Urubamba region at 4 km horizontal resolution (d03) and the upper region of the Rio Santa River Basin at 800 m horizontal resolution (d04). The raw WRF data can be found in the related dataset. Full details of the bias-correction can be found in Fyffe et al., (2021). These data were corrected as part of the PEGASUS (Producing EnerGy and preventing hAzards from SUrface water Storage in Peru) and Peru GROWS (Peruvian Glacier Retreat and its Impact on Water Security) projects. The datasets were created to assess past climate in the Peruvian Andes, as a basis to determine future climate in the region, and as an input for glaciological and hydrological models. The data were created using the British Antarctic Survey high performance computer. The creation of this data was conducted under the Peru GROWS and PEGASUS projects, which were both funded by NERC (grants NE/S013296/1 and NE/S013318/1, respectively) and CONCYTEC through the Newton-Paulet Fund. The Peruvian part of the Peru GROWS project was conducted within the framework of the call E031-2018-01-NERC "Glacier Research Circles", through its executing unit FONDECYT (Contract No. 08-2019-FONDECYT).