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  • The AATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) dataset consists of Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) multimission data which has been reprocessed using various algorithms and in-situ contemporaneous measurements, to provide update retrievals of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and assess their accuracy. This dataset contains version 1.0 of the Level 3 sea surface temperature data product produced by the ARC project team. The main ARC objective was to reduce regional biases in retrieved sea surface temperature (SST) to less than 0.1 K for all global oceans while creating a very homogeneous record with a stability (lack of drift in the observing system and analysis) of 0.05 K decade.

  • The AATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) dataset consists of Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) multimission data which has been reprocessed using various algorithms and in-situ contemporaneous measurements, to provide update retrievals of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and assess their accuracy. This dataset contains version 1.1 of the Level 3 sea surface temperature data product produced by the ARC project team. The main ARC objective was to reduce regional biases in retrieved sea surface temperature (SST) to less than 0.1 K for all global oceans while creating a very homogeneous record with a stability (lack of drift in the observing system and analysis) of 0.05 K decade.

  • The AATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) dataset consists of Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer multimission data which has been reprocessed using various algorithms and in-situ contemporaneous measurements, to provide update retrievals of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and assess their accuracy. This dataset contains Level 3 monthly sea surface temperature data produced in ARC project. The main ARC objective was to reduce regional biases in retrieved sea surface temperature (SST) to less than 0.1 K for all global oceans while creating a very homogeneous record with a stability (lack of drift in the observing system and analysis) of 0.05 K decade.

  • The AATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) dataset consists of Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) multimission data which has been reprocessed using various algorithms and in-situ contemporaneous measurements, to provide update retrievals of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and assess their accuracy. This dataset contains version 1.1.1 of the Level 3 sea surface temperature data product produced by the ARC project team. The main ARC objective was to reduce regional biases in retrieved sea surface temperature (SST) to less than 0.1 K for all global oceans while creating a very homogeneous record with a stability (lack of drift in the observing system and analysis) of 0.05 K decade.

  • The AATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) dataset consists of Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) multimission data which has been reprocessed using various algorithms and in-situ contemporaneous measurements, to provide update retrievals of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and assess their accuracy. ARC reprocesses the ATSR1, ATSR2 and AATSR data using new cloud detection and SST retrievals. The main ARC objective was to reduce regional biases in retrieved sea surface temperature (SST) to less than 0.1 K for all global oceans while creating a very homogeneous record with a stability (lack of drift in the observing system and analysis) of 0.05 K decade. The Level 3 ARC data products are available for ATSR1, ATSR2 and AATSR and in the version 1 release are currently available from 1991 to 2009, producing a homogeneous record of sea surface temperature for this period. Version 1.1 data are available. The previous version 1 data continues to be available. The ARC project was led by Chris Merchant of the University of Edinburgh/NCEO and funded by NERC and the UK Government.

  • The FIDelity and Uncertainty in Climate data records from Earth Observations (FIDUCEO) project Sea and Lake Surface Temperature Climate Data Record core retrieved quantity is the skin (radiometric) temperature of the Earth’s water surfaces (sea and large lakes). This is provided as a best estimate, plus an ensemble of 10 perturbations capturing known uncertainties. The CDR contains grid-cell instantaneous averagesof retrieved surface temperature over ice-free oceans and 300 large lakes. The FIDUCEO Surface Temperature CDR differs from the ESA Sea Surface Temperature Climate Change Initiative CDRs ; which were generated using in the using the same cloud detection and SST retrieval methodology in the following points: - The calibration of the brightness temperatures used is revised for the FIDUCEO ST CDR. The first step in this has been multi-sensor harmonisation to obtain baseline calibration coefficients (Giering et al., 2019). For specific ST application, these coefficients were adjusted such that SSTs had lower bias, using a method of cross-referencing to matched drifting buoys (Merchant et al., 2019) - Perturbations to the obtained ST and quality level determination are provided for an ensemble of 10 members, for the purpose of propagating uncertainty in ST in complex (large scale, non-linear) applications. - The FIDUCEO ST CDR includes retrievals over the world’s 300 largest lakes, unlike the SST-only product. (Lakes, including much smaller lakes,are addressed in other CDRs requiring significantly different methodsto cope with the difficulties of small target water bodies.) Full documentation including product user guide, tutorials, the scientific basis and relevant publications are available in the documentation.

  • The Infrared Sea surface temperature Autonomous (ISAR) measured the skin sea surface temperature for the (A)ATSR Validation Campaign. The ISAR was on-board MV Pride of Bilbao measured the skin sea surface temperature between Portsmouth, UK and Bilbao, Spain from 2004 to 2010. As MV Pride of Bilbao went out of service on mid-late 2010, the instrument was moved to MV Cap Finistere which travelled between Portsmouth, UK and Bilbao, Spain or Santander, Spain. The instrument was on-board the new platform between 2010 and 2012.

  • Skin Sea Surface Temperature data from the (A)ATSR Validation Campaign by ISAR. The prime objective of the (A)ATSR mission is to return accurate measurements of the global sea surface temperature. To ensure the accuracy of the measurement, there have been joint efforts to validate the data. One of these efforts is the (A)ATSR Validation Campaign which involves the deployment of the the Infrared Sea surface temperature Autonomous Radiometer (ISAR). The ISAR is designed to measure accurate and reliable skin sea surface temperature, with automated system of data collection, and its own protection from severe weathers. Data come from the ISAR mounted on cruiseferries MV Pride of Bilbao (2004-2010) and MV Cap Finistere (2010-2012) and were collected continuously throughout the cruises unless severe weather conditions required the instrument to be protected, which results in the prevention of the data collection.

  • These climate projections for the North-West European Shelf Seas update the shelf seas component of UKCP09 Marine Report (Lowe et al, 2009) and were funded by the MINERVA project. This dataset contains ensemble statistics for model output based on the QUMP (Quantifying Uncertainties in Model Projections) ensemble of HadCM3 (Hadley Centre Coupled Model version 3) runs downscaled with the POLCOMS (Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System) under SRES A1B (Special Report on Emissons Scenarios - A1B business-as-usual with medium emissions) conditions, from 1952-2098 for which 30-year means anomalies have been calculated from monthly mean data for each of the 12 months. A Perturbed Physics Ensemble (PPE) of HadCM3 has been downscaled with the shelf seas model POLCOMS. Each of the 11 ensemble members has been downscaled as transient simulations (from 1952-2098) under the SRES A1B emissions scenario. The PPE (QUMP) was designed to span the range of uncertainty associated with model parameter uncertainty in the atmosphere of the driving global climate model. POLCOMS was run at 12 km resolution, with 32 vertical levels using s-coordinates over the NW European Shelf Seas domain (-18.3 to 14 degrees East, 43 to 63.56 degrees North). Monthly statistics of the model results were recorded. Further details can be found in Tinker et al (2015).

  • These climate projections for the North-West European Shelf Seas update the shelf seas component of UKCP09 Marine Report (Lowe et al, 2009) and were funded by the MINERVA project. This dataset contains three ensemble exemplars for model output based on the QUMP (Quantifying Uncertainties in Model Projections) ensemble of HadCM3 (Hadley Centre Coupled Model version 3) runs downscaled with the POLCOMS (Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System) under SRES A1B (Special Report on Emissons Scenarios - A1B business-as-usual with medium emissions) conditions, from 1952-2098 for which 30-year means anomalies have been calculated from monthly mean data for each of the 12 months. A Perturbed Physics Ensemble (PPE) of HadCM3 has been downscaled with the shelf seas model POLCOMS. Each of the 11 ensemble members has been downscaled as transient simulations (from 1952-2098) under the SRES A1B emissions scenario. The PPE (QUMP) was designed to span the range of uncertainty associated with model parameter uncertainty in the atmosphere of the driving global climate model. POLCOMS was run at 12 km resolution, with 32 vertical levels using s-coordinates over the NW European Shelf Seas domain (-18.3 to 14 degrees East, 43 to 63.56 degrees North). Monthly statistics of the model results were recorded. Further details can be found in Tinker et al (2015).