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Seabed photography

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  • This dataset consists of underwater benthic imagery and measurements of light attenuation taken from Paluma Shoals in the Coral Sea following a 2016 El Niño coral bleaching event. Data were collected between 09 and 11 August 2016. Benthic imagery was captured using a SeaViewer Sea-Drop™ Camera (950 Analog model) on 10 August 2016. Light attenuation measurements were taken using a LiCOR LI-192SA Light Meter deployed at a range of depths below the sea surface. These cruises formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "Quantifying ENSO-related bleaching on nearshore, turbid-zone coral reefs grant story”. The data were collected following a major El Niño event which caused mass coral bleaching across the Great Barrier Reef. The event provided opportunity to undertake a rapid assessment of the impacts of bleaching on the turbid-zone reefs in the vicinity of Paluma Shoals (central Halifax Bay). The aim of the project is to ascertain: 1) The total extent of bleaching-induced mortality; 2) The extent to which specific coral species have been impacted; 3) Any immediate impacts on the structural complexity and diversity of the reefs. The Discovery Science project was composed of Standard Grant NE/P007694/1. The grant was held by the University of Exeter, School of Geography and led by Professor Christopher Perry. The funding period ran from 01 July 2016 to 31 March 2017. All data described have been received by BODC from the RRS James Clark Ross and will be processed and made available online in the future. Raw data are available on request. No further data are expected from this project.

  • The Impacts of Deglaciation on Benthic Marine Ecosystems in Antarctica (ICEBERGS) dataset comprises of physical oceanography, marine geology, habitat mapping, community structure and seabed sediment data. The data were collected from CTD deployments, multi-beam swath bathymetry surveys, TOPAS sub-bottom profiling, shallow underwater camera system deployments, plankton net deployments, Agassiz trawls, Hamon grabs and multi-corer deployments during three seasonal cruises around the West Antarctic Peninsula beginning 2017 and scheduled to end in 2021. The data were collected as part of the ICEBERGS project to investigate the impacts of physical disturbance arising from climate-warming induced deglaciation on benthic communities around the West Antarctic Peninsula. The ICEBERGS project is part of the joint funded NERC-CONICYT Initiative and involves collaboration between the University of Exeter, University of Bangor, British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción. The physical data will be managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) with the remainder of the data being submitted to the Polar Data Centre (BAS-PDC).

  • This dataset includes high-definition video imagery, hydrographic and navigation data from the Isis remotely operated vehicle (ROV). These data were then used to perform a biometric and reproductive analysis on Kiwa tyleri sp. which also forms part of the dataset. Four hydrothermal vent and cold seep sites were sampled during thirty one ROV dives: south of Bird Island on the South Georgia shelf, the E2 and E9 segments of the East Scotia Ridge, and the Kemp Seamount. The dives were undertaken between 10th January 2010 and 12th February 2010 during the RRS James Cook research cruise JC042 (7th January - 24th February 2010). The Isis ROV was equipped with a high-definition video camera, a CTD package, an Ultra Short Baseline navigation system and a suction sampler. The data were produced as part of the NERC Consortium Grant project Chemosynthetic Ecosystems in the Southern Ocean (ChEsSo), which funded a total of four cruises (JR224, JC042, JC055 and JC080). The dataset contributed to the project aims to search for, identify and intensively study hydrothermal vent and cold seep sites in the eastern Scotia Sea. The existing dataset was produced by scientists from the University of Southampton and technicians from the National Oceanography Centre. Additional data for these cruises may become available in the future. Please note that the access restrictions for video imagery, hydrographic and navigation data are currently unknown. The biometric and reproductive analysis data are unrestricted and accessible through the Published Data Library.

  • Collection of geophysical and oceanographic data from several cruises dedicated to the repeated mapping and monitoring of three UK Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) - Haig Fras, Whittard Canyon and the Darwin Mounds. Data were collected during the following 2018-2020 cruises: JC166/7, DY103, DY108/9, DY120 and DY106. Data collection took place at three of the UK’s MPAs - Haig Fras Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ) in the Celtic Sea, Whittard Canyon submarine complex, which includes The Canyons MCZ, situated off the south west UK continental shelf and Darwin Mounds Special Area of Conservation (SAC), situated in the northern Rockall Trough. An Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was used to collect photographic data, sidescan sonar and multibeam bathymetry. Other data included shipboard multibeam bathymetry data; moored ADCP, CTD and sediment trap datasets from repeat mooring deployments; ROV video, pushcores and specimen samples; settling plate experiments; box cores and mega cores; BioCam imagery. The MPAs under investigation had been previously surveyed on cruises JC035 (2009) and JC125 (2015) hence these cruises formed part of the Fixed Point Observations Underpinning Activity. Here repeated observations and surveys of MPAs and their surroundings aim to provide insight into the development and recovery of benthic ecosystems following natural and/or anthropogenic impacts. The data collection was undertaken by scientists at the UK’s National Oceanography Centre (NOC) and formed part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Climate Linked Atlantic Sector Science (CLASS) Programme (NERC grant reference NE/R015953/1).

  • Data from the MarineE-tech project were collected via three platforms; ship, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) and Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). Shipboard data includes multibeam bathymetry, sub-bottom profiler, gravimeter and moorings data, plus CTD casts and gravity core samples. AUV data consists of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, sub-bottom profiler, CTD, LADCP, turbidity and magnetics data, plus camera stills. ROV data consists of video and camera stills plus grab samples and drill core samples. Also available are numerical model results and input files from the TELEMAC-3D numerical model developed by HR Wallingford and used to predict currents during plume dispersion experiments. Data were collected from the Tropic Seamount in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean between October and December 2016. A second cruise, DY094, collected data from the Rio Grande Rise and Sao Paulo Ridge region in the Southwest Atlantic Ocean from late 2017 to early 2018. The project deployed robotic underwater technology including the use of the 6500m depth-rated ISIS remotely operated vehicle to sample over 100 locations of FeMn crusts and the 6000m rated AUV Autosub6000 to image the lateral extent and thickness of crusts across the seamounts. Benthic landers and moored instruments such as ADCPs (for disturbance plume monitoring) were also deployed. The JC142 oceanographic data provided verification for the TELEMAC-3D numerical model. This research will improve understanding of the processes controlling the concentration of E-tech deposits and their composition at a local scale, and for the potential impacts of mineral recovery to be identified. MarineE-tech is jointly funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Security of Supply of Mineral Resources (SoS Minerals), Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Programme (EPSRC), and the Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP). Other parties involved include the British Geological Survey (BGS), University of Sao Paulo, University of Bath, University of Leicester, HR Wallingford, Marine Ecological Surveys Ltd (MESL), Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd (SMD).

  • This data set comprises hydrographic measurements including temperature, salinity, fluorescence, attenuance, dissolved oxygen concentrations and current velocities. Water samples were also collected for salinity and geochemical analysis, and the data set also includes bathymetric, sediment and upper ocean turbulence measurements. The data were collected over six Science Missions at the Strait of Sicily, West Coast of Scotland (Loch Etive and Loch Fyne), North-East Scotland and Shetland Islands, North Weddell Sea, Isles of Scilly, Southern North Sea (Norfolk Bank) over the period 19 April 1999 – 25 May 2001. The data were collected by both shipboard sensors and those attached to the Autosub (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) package. Shipboard data collection included deployment of a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) package with attached auxiliary sensors. Lowered acoustic Dopper current profilers (LADCPs) were also attached to the CTD frame, while discrete water samples were collected from the CTD stations. Oceanographic, bathymetric and sediment data were collected along the ship’s track. Autosub measurements included standard environmental parameters and acoustic instruments were used to measure ocean bottom relief at high resolution. A camera was also attached to the vehicle, permitting the collection of detailed photographs of the seabed. The broad aims of the Autosub Programme are the collection of interdisciplinary data sets that cannot be obtained by research ships, and demonstration to the scientific and wider user community of the usefulness of an AUV. Investigators: David A Smeed, Kate Stansfield, Julian Overnell, Kenny D Black, Peter Statham, Chris German, Andrew S. Brierley, Paul G. Fernandes, Mark A. Brandon, Alex Cunningham, Peter Burkill, Glen Tarran, Prof. Mike Collins, Dr George Voulgaris, Dr John Trowbridge, Dr Eugene Terray, Steve A Thorpe and Thomas Osborn. The British Oceanographic Data Centre holds the Autosub navigation files, CTD and ADCP data for each of the missions listed above. The data are contained as high resolution time series. The data are presently being processed and have not been fully quality controlled. The Autosub science missions brought together researchers and engineers from a number of UK institutions, with the project being coordinated by the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.

  • The dataset comprises measurements of hydrographic, bathymetric, sedimentary and meteorological parameters. These include water currents, temperature, salinity and wave parameters; suspended and seabed sediment; coastal geomorphological characteristics; and atmospheric temperature, pressure, humidity, irradiance and wind velocities. The study area was centred on the tidal inlet within the Peninsula do Ancao, Ria Formosa National Park, Algarve, Portugal. Field measurements were collected in the offshore area, the surf zone, beach experiments, the inlet areas and the inlet mouth between January and March 1999. The study utilised moorings, sediment grabs, tidal predictions, radar systems, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ACDP) surveys, a jack-up barge, beach experiments, video tower images, aerial surveys, seabed photographs and field campaign images. INDIA aimed to gain a better understanding of the interactions between tides, waves, currents and sedimentary processes at work in the European coastal zone with a view to predicting change. INDIA was coordinated by the University of Liverpool, Department of Civil Engineering. Data have been provided and/or modelled by a number of organisations from countries including France, Poland, Portugal, Australia, Netherlands, USA and the UK. Data management support for the project was provided by the British Oceanographic Data Centre. All data collected as part of the project were lodged with BODC who had responsibility for assembling and fully documenting the data.

  • The Autosub Under Ice (AUI) data set comprises hydrographic measurements including temperature, salinity, fluorescence, attenuance, dissolved oxygen concentrations and current velocities. Water samples were also collected for salinity and geochemical analysis, and the data set also includes bathymetric and sediment data. The measurements were collected near Greenland and Antarctica in the respective summer seasons for each hemisphere during 2003, 2004 and 2005. The programme consisted of four cruises onboard the ice-capable research vessel RRS James Clark Ross (JCR106, JCR106B, JCR84, JCR97). Data were collected by both shipboard sensors and those attached to the Autosub (an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) package. Shipboard data collection included deployment of a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) package with attached auxiliary sensors. Lowered acoustic Dopper current profilers (LADCPs) were also attached to the CTD frame, while discrete water samples were collected from the CTD stations. Oceanographic, bathymetric and sediment data were collected along the ship's track, while further current data were collected from two mooring deployments. Autosub measurements included standard environmental parameters and acoustic instruments were used to measure ice shelf, sea ice and ocean bottom relief at high resolution. A camera was also attached to the vehicle, permitting the collection of detailed photographs of the seabed. Autosub had been upgraded to achieve 1000 km range and 2500 m water depth, which provided unprecedented access to ice covered regions. The AUI programme was established to investigate the marine environment of floating ice shelves with a view to advancing our understanding of their role in the climate system. It brought together researchers and engineers from a number of UK institutions, with the project being coordinated by the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.

  • This dataset consists of a variety of hydrographic, biogeochemical and meteorological data. Hydrographic profiles, towed and underway measurements and point sources provided information on free-fall turbulence data, current velocities and acoustic backscatter, water column structure including temperature and salinity, the underwater light field, fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. A comprehensive biogeochemical water sampling programme provided details on nutrients, primary productivity, dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton pigments. Biological samples such as zooplankton were obtained from the water column using nets, and from the sea-bed using grabs. Bathymetry and meteorological parameters were measured across the study area. A dye release experiment was also carried out. Data collection was undertaken in the Celtic Sea. The data were collected during the period 02 - 27 July 2008 during RRS James Cook cruise JC025. Measurements were taken using a variety of instrumentation, including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, bathymetric echosounders, water bottle samplers, nets, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), remote access water samplers, towed undulators, free-fall turbulence profilers, temperature loggers, fluorometers, grabs and ship flow-through and meteorological packages. The data have been collected as part of the United Kingdom (UK) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Oceans 2025 programme (Work Package 3.2) to provide information on vertical mixing processes at the thermocline. This will help improve modelling of these processes and is an expansion of work carried out during a previous National Oceanography Centre Liverpool (NOCL) project ‘Physical-Biological Control of New Production within the Seasonal Thermocline’. The cruise was undertaken jointly by NOCL, the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences (SAMS), the University of Aberdeen, the University of Strathclyde, Napier University and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The Principal Scientist during the research cruise was Professor Jonathan Sharples of NOCL, who is also the Principal Investigator of Work Package 3.2. CTD data, towed undulator data, temperature logger data, nutrient data, ADCP data, dye tracking data, zooplankton data, primary productivity data and ship underway monitoring system data from this cruise are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other data have not yet been supplied.

  • The Northern Seas Programme dataset comprises hydrographic, biogeochemical, biological and meteorological data. Hydrographic profiles provided measurements of parameters such as temperature, salinity, fluorescence and dissolved oxygen, while current velocities and acoustic backscatter were also measured. A comprehensive water sampling program permitted the collection of biogeochemical data including concentrations of various organic compounds, dissolved gas concentrations and radioactivity. Water samples were also analysed for phytoplankton, zooplankton and viruses. Larger biological samples were obtained from the water column using trawl nets and cetacean distributions were monitored using hydrophone arrays. Sediment samples were collected at various locations and analysed for biogeochemical parameters and zoobenthos. Sample data were supplemented by those derived from experiments, while bathymetry and meteorological parameters were measured across the study area. Data collection was undertaken in the Irish and northern North Seas, across the NE Atlantic and up to the marginal Arctic pack ice zone. This includes the territorial waters of the UK, Norway and the Russian Arctic, and extends from coastal fjords to the ocean margins. The data were collected during the period 2001-2007 over a number of cruises: RRS Discovery cruise D257, RRS James Clark Ross cruises JR75 and JR127, RRS Charles Darwin cruise CD176 and FS Poseidon cruise PO300/2. Measurements were taken using a variety of instrumentation, including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, bathymetric echosounders, sediment samplers, trawl nets and acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), while incubation chambers were used for shipboard experiments. The programme was designed to advance the understanding of how marine systems in Northern Seas respond to environmental and anthropogenic change and was developed in three themes: Theme A - Understanding fjordic systems insights for coastal and oceanic processes; Theme B - Ocean Margins: the interface between the coastal zone and oceanic realm; Theme C - Measuring and modelling change: sea sensors and bioinformatics. Theme B included the Ellett Line Time Series. The Northern Seas Programme was co-ordinated by the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS). Data from the programme are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.