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Species Distribution

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  • This dataset gives axiophyte score for plants in Great Britain, based on Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI) published lists of axiophytes for 24 counties in Great Britain. Axiophytes have been defined as 'worthy plants', that is, species that are indicative of high quality habitat within a particular region. This information product takes the county lists that were available in May 2016, and summarises the data in order to produce national (i.e. Great Britain) level scores of 'axiophyte-ness'; that is, the extent to which a species has been selected as a good indicator of high quality habitat where it occurs. This meta-list of axiophytes will be updated in the future as more county-level lists become available. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/af2ac4af-12c6-4152-8ed7-e886ed19622b

  • This dataset contains data from the National Plant Monitoring Scheme between 2015 and 2016. These consist of plant species occurrences, with abundance values, in plots. Plots are nested with 1 km squares, and are georeferenced according to the British/Irish/Channel Islands grid systems, or in latitude/longitude format; the 1 km squares surveyed were selected according to a weighted-random design, designed to enrich the sample for semi-natural habitats. Plots also have associated habitat and spatial information, as well as a small number of other environmental data. The species recorded in any particular plot are dependent on the habitat chosen for the plot by the surveyor, and the level of the scheme at which they were participating. Please see the references in the supporting documentation (survey guidance) for more information. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ba39167d-421a-4bfb-b504-56e9f8a38746

  • This dataset contains data from the National Plant Monitoring Scheme in 2015. These consist of plant species occurrences, with abundance values, in plots. Plots are nested with 1 km squares, and are georeferenced according to the British/Irish/Channel Islands grid systems, or in latitude/longitude format; the 1 km squares surveyed were selected according to a weighted-random design, designed to enrich the sample for semi-natural habitats. Plots also have associated habitat and spatial information, as well as a small number of other environmental data. The species recorded in any particular plot are dependent on the habitat chosen for the plot by the surveyor, and the level of the scheme at which they were participating. Please see the references in the supporting documentation (survey guidance) for more information. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/33fe87f9-d45a-41ba-acca-ee8585ea6b7d

  • NB The data are stored in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) with accession numbers as follows: ENA accession number: ERP016063 - Name "Daisy Lake Shotgun" - Study PRJEB14421 ena-STUDY-UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE-15-06-2016-17:31:41:520-20 and can be accessed at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB14421 ENA accession number: ERP019980 - Name "Sudbury Lake mesocosms shotgun" - Study PRJEB18063 ena-STUDY-UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE-23-11-2016-12:04:04:617-1945 and can be accessed at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB18063 ENA accession number: ERP110084 - Name "Lake sediment mesocosm microbial communities" STUDY PRJEB27946 ena-STUDY-UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE-26-07-2018-16:21:00:749-1221 and can be accessed at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB27946

  • Data comprise monitoring records of a population of Gryllus campestris, a flightless, univoltine field cricket that lives in and around burrows excavated among the grass in a meadow in Asturias (North Spain). The area has an altitude range from around 60 to 270 metres above sea level. The data include birth and death days, age at capture, air temperature and calling activity. Data were collected from 2006 to 2016. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5c8c8f74-5287-4251-87f7-2b965b400624

  • This data resource provides plot-level plant occurrence data for the first three years (2015-2017) of the National Plant Monitoring Scheme (covering the UK, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man). Data consist of individual observations of plants, and other habitat characteristics, at the metre-scale; observations are accompanied by percentage cover information recorded according to the Domin frequency-abundance scale commonly used in plant community ecology. Other information provided includes the plot type (size, shape, according to the NPMS classification), the volunteer-recorded NPMS habitat, the date of sampling, and information regarding the spatial location of the plot. Information contained within the metadata file should allow users to reconstruct the sampling history (including gaps) of any plot that has been sampled within the NPMS scheme between 2015 and 2017. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/890e4d3d-ae93-4528-8e88-bc01bae3907b

  • This dataset contains GPS data fixes (WGS84 format) from 32 European nightjars (Caprimulgus europaeus) . The data contains additional information on identity of the bird, date, time of fix acquisition, and the associated site and night number (between 6 and 17 nights of data, varying between individuals). These data were collected on the Humberhead peatlands NNR, South Yorkshire, from 2015 until 2018. Birds were caught in mist nets and tail-mounted miniaturised GPS tags (Pathtrack, Otley, UK; <3% bird bodyweight) were fitted by BTO-licensed researchers. Data were collected as part of a NERC ACCE-funded PhD. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/aa20f8c4-bbdb-4dfa-82b4-b9b3fd8f34eb

  • Bird community data from fixed point count stations generated by experienced ornithologists in Borneo and the Wallacean islands of Sulawesi (Buton), Seram, Buru, Talaud and Sangihe. Bird surveys were undertaken between 2016 and 2020, with work on any given island lasting ~3 months, except for Borneo where surveys were undertaken across 3 years (2014 – 2016). Surveys were repeated four times at each site on Sulawesi (Buton), Seram, Buru and once each on Talaud and Sangihe. The dataset comprises the aggregated counts from multiple surveys of the same point count sites, and assigned to individual bird species, landscape and island. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/87f36a61-ca79-40c6-b781-8936ead162cc

  • This dataset contains home range size, habitat availability and selection ratio data, calculated from GPS data fixes collected from individual European nightjars, in four concurrent years (2015-2018). Home ranges are 95% areas of use, presented in hectares. Habitat availability data are presented as the percentage (%) of each habitat category (n = 6, pooled from 14 original habitat types) available to each individual within their 95% home range. Selection ratios are Manly Selection Ratios for 14 habitat types and express the extent to which each habitat type is used by each individual bird, compared to how much of it is available. Selection Ratios >1 express positive selection – i.e. used more than expected, given availability. Selection Ratios <1 express avoidance – i.e. used less than expected, given availability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d5cc1b92-6862-4475-8aa1-5936786d12ab

  • Records of leaf damage caused by and parasitism of Cameraria ohridella in Britain in 2010 collected with a citizen science approach as part of the Conker Tree Science citizen science project, plus validation of the data. Over 3500 people in Great Britain provided data at a national scale on an invasive insect (horse-chestnut leaf-mining moth, Cameraria ohridella Deschka & Dimic; Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) in order to address two hypotheses. Specifically: (1) whether the levels of damage caused to leaves of the horse-chestnut tree, Aesculus hippocastanum L., and (2) whether the level of parasitism of C. ohridella larvae were both greatest where C. ohridella had been present the longest Participants recorded leaf damage on an ordinal scale (0-4) during the summer (1st July to 15th October 2010). In order to assess the levels of parasitism of caterpillars of C. orhidella, we invited people to rear insects from horse chestnut leaves infested with C. ohridella. Participants sampled leaves during the first week of July 2010 (i.e. the first of the moth's gererations that year) and stored them in sealed plastic bags for two weeks. We then asked participants to report the number of leaf-mines, and to identify and count the insects in each category: adult C. ohridella moths, parasitoids, and other insects. Anyone could take part in rearing parasitoids, but we particularly focused on school children aged 8-11 by working with a team of eight trained volunteers across the country who directly contacted schools and led lessons in classes. The volunteers did not provide directive guidance during the time that the children were counting adult moths and parasitoids, so the data were not biased by our supervision. At the completion of the activity, we retained a randomly-selected subset of 669 samples that the children had counted. We also retained an additional 75 samples in which children had reported parasitoids. For all of these samples an expert blindly assessed the counts of leaf mines, adult C. ohridella moths and other insects. In order to assess how many years that C. orhidella had been present in a location, we used a long-term dataset collated by Forest Research (used with permission). These data showed under-sampling of the range of C. orhidella after 2006, so we also modeled the predicted arrival of C. orhidella based on a demographic model of spread parameterised in continental Europe by augementing the known distribution with a model of short-distance spread by the model. We ran the model twice, assuming two and three generations of C. ohridella, respectively. The project was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council and undertaken at the University of Bristol, UK. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9f913f10-6e3d-449e-b8af-8fa2d06d7fd3